Leni Riefenstahl: A Memoir

Leni Riefenstahl: A Memoir

by Leni Riefenstahl

Paperback(Reprint)

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Overview

A New York Times Notable Book of the Year.

One of the century's most remarkable and controversial women, Leni Riefenstahl is an artist of the first order. Dancer, actor, and photographer, she is best known as the director of Triumph of the Will, a film of a Nazi Party rally and Olympia, the classic account of the 1936 Berlin Olympics. It is for these works of cinematic propaganda that Riefenstahl is revered and reviled. In this autobiography, she discusses her motivations, her history, her important friendships, and, most of all, her art. Along with insights into directing and camera work, Riefenstahl offers an emotional, powerful story of a woman who refuses to be defined by any terms other than her own.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780312119263
Publisher: Picador
Publication date: 01/15/1995
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 672
Sales rank: 1,223,261
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.58(d)

About the Author

Leni Riefenstahl lives in Europe.

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Leni Riefenstahl: A Memoir 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Read this memoir for the worlds she recalls and recreates. It is less a tract of explanation and instead a statement of an artist who lived, prospered and suffered on the other side of history; in the end came out of another rabbit hole to a new life as a chronicler of life with the Nuba, and her new life in Africa and the world of the late 20th century. Aside from the historical concussions, this is the story of an influential film director. The work as director is equally that of artiste and business executive. She describes the German film industry of the giant UFA age, an industry that no longer exists. In fact, that is her favorite motif: the transcience of experience from fact to memory, and then the degradation of memory. The image endures.