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Let It Be... Naked
     

Let It Be... Naked

3.9 35
by The Beatles
 

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Long a contentious album among Beatlemaniacs -- and among the Beatles themselves -- Let It Be took a long and winding road to its ultimate release. The recording's original sessions -- for an album to be titled Get Back -- were made as a counterpart to an in-the-studio film in 1969, before Abbey Road<

Overview

Long a contentious album among Beatlemaniacs -- and among the Beatles themselves -- Let It Be took a long and winding road to its ultimate release. The recording's original sessions -- for an album to be titled Get Back -- were made as a counterpart to an in-the-studio film in 1969, before Abbey Road. The album wasn't released, however, until 1970, after Phil Spector was brought in as producer and after the Beatles had broken up. This rethought rendition is less of an original version than it is 20/20 hindsight in action, and it stirred controversy even before its release. Naked removes much of Spector's studio frippery and lush orchestration, along with all of the between-songs quips and introductions, leaving many of the songs in comparatively stark relief. The difference is most notable on "The Long and Winding Road," where Paul McCartney's earthy vocal sounds clear as a bell atop a string-free arrangement guided by piano and organ. The bulk of the tinkering is subtler, with slightly less spaciness exuding from "Across the Universe," a fair amount of looseness from "One After 909," and an enhanced gospel tone to the haunting title song, which now closes the album. Other changes are more rudimentary: A pair of tunes -- "Maggie Mae" and "Dig It" -- were dropped altogether, and in their place, a new set of producers deigned to deposit "Don't Let Me Down," which long ago outgrew its hidden status as the B-side of "Get Back." Naked may pose more questions surrounding the original release of Let It Be than it answers, but its status as an essential release by rock's most formidable and creative group is indisputable.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide
In its original form, Let It Be signaled the end of an era, closing the book on the Beatles, as well as literally and figuratively marking the end of the '60s. The 1970 release evolved from friction-filled sessions the band intended to be an organic, bare-bones return to their roots. Instead, the endless hours of tapes were eventually handed over to Phil Spector, since neither the quickly splintering Beatles nor their longtime producer George Martin wanted to sift through the voluminous results. Let It Be... Naked sets the record straight, revisiting the contentious sessions, stripping away the Spectorian orchestrations, reworking the running order, and losing all extemporaneous in-studio banter. On this version of the album, filler tracks ("Dig It," "Maggie Mae") are dropped, while the juicy B-side "Don't Let Me Down" is added. The most obvious revamping is on the songs handled heavily by Spector. Removing the orchestrations from "The Long and Winding Road" and "Across the Universe" gives Paul McCartney's vocals considerably more resonance on the former, doing the same for John Lennon's voice and guitar on the latter. This alternate take on Let It Be enhances the album's power, reclaiming the raw, unadorned quality that was meant to be its calling card from the beginning.
New York Times - Allan Kozinn
"Let It Be . . . Naked" is a real treat. Remixed from the original multitrack session tapes, these performances have a warmth and fullness that makes the sound on the original album seem flat and squashed.
Blender - Paul Du Noyer
Whatever your reservations, let's celebrate the transformation of a second-rate Beatles album into one more worthy of their legend.

Product Details

Release Date:
07/15/2008
Label:
Emd Int'l
UPC:
0724359543802
catalogNumber:
5954380
Rank:
19585

Related Subjects

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Beatles   Primary Artist

Customer Reviews

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Let It Be... Naked 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 35 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This version of Let It Be is sounds 100 times better than the original. The bass tones are bassier, the vocals cleaner and the jibberish between songs omitted. Capitol should remaster all the other Beatle titles like this one. The sound is simply superb.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Finally after more than thirty years, the wonderful songs of 'Let It Be' devoid of the overblown, fragmented, and congealed Phil Spector production. It's especially nice to hear what 'The Long and Winding Road' actually sounds like.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Like the Beach Boys 'Smile' and Jimi Hendrix' 'First Rays of the New Rising Sun', the Beatles' 'Let it Be' will forever be discussed and debated in the category of albums that never really were, leaving much conjecture and guesswork up to the fans. To McCartney's credit (and whoever else had much to do with the making of 'LIB...Naked'), "Don't Let Me Down" is restored to where it belongs, associated with the Get Back/Let it Be sessions, not simply a track from the Hey Jude compilation, or just a b-side of a single (plus the 'Naked' version is worthy). Also the de-Spectorization of "The Long and Winding Road", "Across the Universe" and "I Me Mine" make for interesting tracks, in comparison to the original Let it Be versions. Some think the album sounds too slick, missing the in-between asides ("I dig a pygmy" etc) and the two short songs left off in favor of "Don't Let Me Down" - I found the overall sound more upfront and direct, as if I was there in the studio with JPG&R (close as I'm going to get anyway). I would've preferred, as many Beatles fans do, any Glyn Johns' versions of what would be a 'Get Back' album. It's likely that now, as then, the Beatles (today meaning Paul, Ringo & estates of John and George) still do not want fans to hear raw, underproduced and ragged recordings from their 'Get Back' sessions. Having hear bootlegs of projected GB albums, I think I can see why from their viewpoint. Some of the recordings are simply not that good or up to standards set by the White Album, never mind anything from 1967 or before. The Beatles have a reputation and image to uphold as the greatest pop music group of all time, and to release anything like what Glyn Johns had done might undermine that reputation, no matter what original intentions they had when they started the project. The original Phil Spector produced 'Let it Be' does in fact do what John Lennon once said - take recordings made during the worst period of their career, of substandard material, and made something out of it. So if you want to hear what Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr (for the most part - that sticker on the CD stating that this is as it was meant to be heard - one has to wonder if Lennon and/or Harrison would think so) think the 'Let it Be' album should sound like, then take a chance and get 'Naked' ... but not if you don't already have the original Let it Be first.
Guest More than 1 year ago
even if It is not released yet, I listen to this yesterday on the radio in LA, the sound now is so clear, it is a real treat to every beatlemaniac and even the new fans, I will still listen to the original Let it be album too, but this new version really captures my heart. The real sound, the way it was supposed to be originally, for sure one of the best albuns of this year.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I really liked this album because the songs seemed a lot clearer than one the original album. I really like this album's "I Me Mine" and "The Long and Winding Road." I also like the song arrangement on this album better than the other one. One bad thing, though, is that they cut some of the actual song on a few of them like on "Get Back." Overall, though most people don't agree with me, the album is very good and better than the original.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Let us be clear about one thing: this is not the Let it Be album the way it was meant to be heard. It is simply one person's (Paul McCartney's) interpretation of the album. This version of Let it Be represents Paul's attempt to correct the many "mistakes" he perceived were prevalent on the original release, most notably Phil Spector's lush orchestrations which Paul believed "ruined" his compositions, most notably, "The Long & Winding Road." Like many Beatle fans, I long to hear the original "Get Back" project the way the Beatles meant for it to be heard. But, we will have to wait a little longer, since this is not that. I have to admit I prefer the original "Let it Be" release. The stripped down feel of many of the songs, the short bits of humour, and, yes, even the lush orchestrations lent a bit of humanity to the project that is missing on this overproduced, sterile "remake." "The Long & Winding Road" sounds naked and bare without Phil Spector's touch. The orchestration and choral vocals lent an air of poignancy and beauty to the song that underscored what was happening in the Beatles's lives at that time. A stripped down version of "The Long & Winding Road" is already available on The Beatles Anthology 3 if you really have to hear it. "Get Back" sounds rough and incomplete on this version. The humour at the end of the version on the original Let it Be released added to the charm of the song. The version on Let it Be. . .Naked does not even include the extended bridge at the end of the single version which may have helped, especially since it was chosen to lead off this project. While it is nice to have "Don't Let Me Down" included on this version, it works better as a B-side and it is not one of the Beatles's best songs anyway. "Old Brown Shoe" would have probably fit this project better. The extra disc is like a mini-edition of the Anthology project but would probably not appeal to non-Beatle fans. Overall, this project has limited historical value, but for my money, the original edition of Let it Be is still the best.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The clarity of this refurbished album makes it hard to believe Let It Be was originally recorded over 30 years ago. While listening to this masterpiece, you'lde think you stepped (back in time) into the mixing studio at Abbey Road or were on the rooftop with John, Paul, George, and Ringo it's that crisp. In fact, at the end of the new "Across the Universe", John Lennon actually sounds like thats where he's singing from. Now that the Phil Spector post-production fluff has been stripped away, LIBN takes its place along side Rubber Soul, Revolver, Sgt.Pepper & Abbey Road as one of the Beatles best albums. Get Back to your local music store and buy this CD immediately!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am very disappointed. It's very nice to hear their young voices again. However, I'm not sure if it is just the CD I received- (there are no scratches on the CD) or the recording. It would sound much better if the songs didn't just CUT OFF, pause and start. It sounds like it was recorded from old scratched records.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I must admit the songs do sound better than the original release but I dont think its worth the amount of money wanted for it. Unless you really want it of course. The excellent song "Dont let me down" isnt available on many other CD's so thats one good thing. Its about time that Capitol records comes out with a collection of Beatles singles on a few discs so all the single that are harder to get on the albums would be in one place.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Sir Paul McCartney flamboyantly said "If we had today's technology, it would sound like this." John Lennon and George Harrison are no longer around to give their 2 cents, but Ringo Starr seemed to agree. I'd have to agree with the last person in that I like this version a little better, too. Of course, John Lennon's wisecracks at the end of "Get Back" and at the beginning of "Two of Us" are missing, but that's just a minour complaint. This isn't my favourite Beatles album (and very few Beatles fans'). However, I personally prefer this version of "The Long and Winding Road" without the cheezy choir (I'm sure Sir Paul would gladly appreciate someone agreeing with him) and this version of "Across the Universe" and "I Me Mine," though the latter has one verse repeated like on the "original" release. The Fly on the Wall disk is fun to listen to but not something I'd listen to very often (for collectors only). We all know this isn't the "original" Get Back album many of us were expecting. Ok, that's my review. If you don't agree, send your non-helpful votes (oops, wrong website!).
Guest More than 1 year ago
Beautiful...and I loved the original. But now I can really hear them playing and with the strings and effects brought down I feel like they are playing live right in front of me. It has the same intimacy as Rubber Soul and Revolver.
Guest More than 1 year ago
More than just sonically superior to its predecessor, "...naked" is a genuinely different album. A raw and honest sound which falls somehow in between the deconstructed feel of the White Album and the cleaned up outtakes of Anthology III. Almost like an "unproduced," anadorned final take. The excising of the inter-track banter is an improvement, giving the music the dignity of setting it deserves. Probably the closest thing to sitting in an intimate club and hearing this greatest of all quartets live.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
MRNEUTRON More than 1 year ago
While nothing will ever make me throw the original "Let It Be" album away, "Let It Be...Naked" is a nice addition to The Beatles' catalog. Wikipedia has a detailed list of each track, explaining which recordings were used to create "LIBN". While very little of this is a revelation, I always welcome officially released outtakes from my favorite group. By the way, the version of "The Long And Winding Road" here is not simply the "Let It Be" version without Spector's overdubs(That one is on "Anthology 3"). The version here is the one seen in the "Let It Be" movie.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
My mother bought this CD and said it was good. She has lots of Beatles CDs and if you do too, buy this CD.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Beatles took there last cd (let it be)and remade the album that they wanted. This album is reallly go. i heard the cd in the internet in there website and its better than the original to me.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've been waiting for this CD since I first heard that Paul McCartney was doing it. I can't wait. I've heard "The Unreleased Let It Be" as well as the alternate versions from The Beatles Anthology 3. This should definitely be a brilliant CD. I love the original that was released in 1970, but it will be cool to hear how it was "as nature intended...warts and all". I'm a Big Beatles Fan. This should definitely be in the collection!
Guest More than 1 year ago
IT IS GREAT!!!!! It is Beatles through and through. Their sound. Their magic. So much better than the original Phil Spector version. Thank you so much for bringing this to us after all these years. It is a wonderful surprise!!!!!!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Let It Be was a fine album in its own right. Phil Spector's production actually shone some light into the half-baked songs (particularly The Long And Winding Road). Here, the mess that became Let It Be is even worse. All the funny dialog between the Beatles? Gone! Any hopes of hearing some unreleased songs extracted straight from the vaults? Eighty-sixed! Fully-finished songs in their entirety? Adios! The happiness of Beatles fans like me? See ya! What's more, the brainchild behind the project was Paul McCartney. It's bad enough he listed the credits as "McCartney/Lennon", but now he wants Let It Be to sound the way he wanted to, with a raw sound. That "bonus" disc offers no heart in the project, since all it basically is is little annoying snippets of songs. They should recall this CD and replace it with Get Back...the great lost album that Let It Be should have been.