ISBN-10:
081088528X
ISBN-13:
9780810885288
Pub. Date:
Publisher:
Libraries, Classrooms, and the Interests of Democracy: Marking the Limits of Neoliberalism

Libraries, Classrooms, and the Interests of Democracy: Marking the Limits of Neoliberalism

by John Buschman

Paperback

$91.00
View All Available Formats & Editions
Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for delivery by Thursday, September 23

Overview

Library marketing and advertising in schools are now very widespread practices. Since libraries and schools have been strongly linked to economic performance, adopting marketing and advertising techniques into them is often seen as a natural extension of that linkage. But should that be the case? John Buschman argues that as we shape and guide our educative institutions, we should carefully consider the consequences.

In Libraries, Classrooms, and the Interests of Democracy: Marking the Limits of Neoliberalism, Dr. Buschman details the connections between our educative institutions and democracy, and the resources within democratic theory reflecting on the tensions between marketing, advertising, consumption, and democracy. Drawing on wide scholarship to explore some of the history of democratic theory and its intertwinements with capitalism, the author helps the reader think about how democracies can deal with the challenges of this current historical phase. The complex arguments of de Tocqueville, Dewey, Marx, and many others help clarify how the market has pierced classrooms and libraries with advertising and marketing-and why this is of concern in the interests of democracy.

In this volume, Buschman provides a history of marketing and advertising and their entanglements with democracy, education, and libraries. He then engages Democratic Theory and the framework it provides to critique neoliberalism's influences. A final chapter traces the trajectory of neoliberalism and educative institutions on our democracy. Throughout, the book makes clear that issues concerning public educative institutions in a democracy are political. A provocative and engaging book, Libraries, Classrooms, and the Interests of Democracy should be required reading for anyone interested in the challenges facing libraries today.


Related collections and offers

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780810885288
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Publication date: 08/16/2012
Pages: 248
Product dimensions: 5.97(w) x 8.99(h) x 0.78(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

John Buschman is Dean of University Libraries at Seton Hall University. He was previously Associate University Librarian for Scholarly Resources and Services at Georgetown University. Buschman is currently on the editorial boards of Library Quarterly and the Journal of Academic Librarianship. He is the author of Dismantling the Public Sphere: Situating and Sustaining Libraries in the Age of the New Public Philosophy (2003); editor of Critical Approaches to Information Technology in Librarianship: Foundations and Applications (1993); co-editor of Library as Place: History, Community and Culture (2006), Information Technology in Librarianship: New Critical Approaches (2008), Critical Theory for Library and Information Science:  Exploring the Social from Across the Disciplines (2010), and many articles.

Table of Contents

Author's Preface

Part I: Setting the Stage
Chapter 1: Should We Be Bothered By Library Marketing and Advertising in the Classroom, and If So, Why?-An Introduction
Chapter 2: An Historical View I: A Précis on the Entanglements of Democracy, Education, and Libraries in America
Chapter 3: An Historical View II: A Précis on Advertising in Schools, Marketing in Libraries, and the Appeal of Neoliberalism
Chapter 4: From Theoretical to Empirical Critiques of Advertising: Have They Deepened Understanding of Democracy and Our Educative Institutions?

Part II: The Insights of Democratic Theory
Chapter 5: Tocqueville and the Centrifugal/Centripetal Forces Within America: Why (and How Much) Our Practices in Libraries and Classrooms Matter
Chapter 6: A Practical Communitarianism: Educative Institutions, Social Bonds, and Neoliberalism's Incursions
Chapter 7: Deliberative Democratic Theory's Deeper Critique: The Profound Effects of Neoliberalism's Grammar in Educative Institutions
Chapter 8: Looking Ahead at Neoliberalism's Trajectory: The Continuing Interests of Democracy and Educative Institutions-A Conclusion

References
Author Biography

What People are Saying About This

Kathleen de la Pena McCook

Libraries and other U.S. educational institutions can reject neo-liberalism, but first we need to understand the evolution of this soul-limiting strategy of self interest that pervades U.S. institutions in the 21st century. John Buschman explicates the advance of neo-liberalism in Libraries, Classrooms, and the Interests of Democracy and provides thoughtful philosophical insight with contemporary examples such as the effects of the Citizens United decision. Buschman extends the deliberations of critical educational theory, communitarianism, and Jürgen Habermas among others to the enterprise of librarianship. He demonstrates that libraries are one of the important cultural sites that provide for the capacities of sound judgment in a democracy. The model of the Occupy Wall Street library provides a respite from institutional weariness and gives promise to a break with the neo-liberal ideas. As in his Dismantling the Public Sphere, Buschman provokes librarians to understand the political and social context of our practice.

Richard A. Brosio

The author is an erudite scholar who helps the reader to think about how democracies can deal with the challenges of this current historical phase. Dr. Buschman understands that neoliberalism is hegemonic, and he draws on wide scholarship to explore some of the history of democratic theory and its intertwinements with capitalism. We meet Tocqueville, John Dewey, Marx, Michael Sandel, Habermas, and many others who have wrestled with these issues in historical and contemporary terms. These complex arguments are brought to bear with clarity on an explanation of how the market has pierced classrooms and libraries with advertising and marketing—and why this is of concern in the interests of democracy. Paraphrasing Michael Parenti about the wants of the wealthy and powerful, when asking what neoliberalism seeks to shape, the answer is: most everything.

Customer Reviews