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Life in the West
     

Life in the West

by Teresa Domnauer
 

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What were soddies?

Settlers build homes called soddies out of chunks of sod, or grass and soil.

Inside, You'll Find:

What it was like to go to school in the West more than 100 years ago;

Maps, a timeline, photos-and the challenges of living with grasshoppers;

Surprising TRUE facts that will shock and amaze you!

Overview

What were soddies?

Settlers build homes called soddies out of chunks of sod, or grass and soil.

Inside, You'll Find:

What it was like to go to school in the West more than 100 years ago;

Maps, a timeline, photos-and the challenges of living with grasshoppers;

Surprising TRUE facts that will shock and amaze you!

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Heather N. Kolich
In general terms, this title in the "A True Book" series explains why people journeyed west in the 1800s, what they hoped to find or accomplish in lands west of the Mississippi River, how they got there; some of the hardships they faced along the trail and during settlement, and the impact westward expansion made on the environment. Chapter One touches on the Louisiana Purchase, the Lewis and Clark expedition, the Oregon Treaty, the California gold rush, and the Homestead Act of 1862. In the rush to cover so much territory, Domnauer's claim that, "For a small fee, any U.S. citizen could buy 160 acres (65 hectares) of land . . .," oversimplifies the Homestead Act to the point of inaccuracy. The land was not for sale. Individuals paid a small sum to file a legal claim to work the land and earn ownership over time; claimants had to meet certain requirements, such as age, head of household status, and loyalty to the U.S.; and claims were open to people who were not yet U.S. citizens. Chapter Two mentions discrimination against Chinese immigrants, the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution, the African-American community of Nicodemus, and the removal of western Native Americans to reservations. Chapter Three gets a little meatier, as readers discover how pioneers built their homes and see the work every member of the family had to do to survive. Excitement fuels Chapter Four, with descriptions of hazards the prairies dealt settlers and the inventions, like John Deere's steel plow, that helped settlers overcome challenges. The final chapter sounds a sour environmental note. Supplements at the end include a page of statistics, list of resources, a glossary, an index and an author's page. Reviewer: Heather N. Kolich

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780531212462
Publisher:
Scholastic Library Publishing
Publication date:
09/01/2010
Series:
Scholastic True Book Series
Pages:
48
Sales rank:
287,875
Product dimensions:
6.90(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.20(d)
Age Range:
8 - 10 Years

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