The Life of Glass

The Life of Glass

by Jillian Cantor

Hardcover

$16.99
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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780061686511
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 02/09/2010
Pages: 340
Sales rank: 874,625
Product dimensions: 5.20(w) x 7.20(h) x 1.30(d)
Lexile: 860L (what's this?)
Age Range: 12 - 17 Years

About the Author

Jillian Cantor has a BA in English from Penn State University and an MFA from the University of Arizona. She is the author of award-winning novels for teens and adults, including, most recently, the critically acclaimed The Lost LetterThe Hours Count, and Margot. Born and raised in a suburb of Philadelphia, Cantor currently lives in Arizona with her husband and two sons.

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The Life of Glass 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 16 reviews.
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
THE LIFE OF GLASS is a coming-of-age story of a high school freshman dealing with the death of her father and her troubling feelings for her best friend. Melissa McAllister is the smart one. She spent lots of time with her father, who shared interesting facts and tidbits with her. But her father has died of cancer, leaving behind his journal of thoughts and findings. It's to this journal that Melissa turns to when she needs to keep her father close. When her best friend, Ryan, discovers a special piece of glass in the wash where they hang out in the dry season, she tells him that a single piece of glass can last a million years. Melissa keeps the glass with her most of the time as her special token. During the course of her freshman year, Melissa lives in the shadows of her beautiful older sister. Her mom and sister share a bond that she's always been left out of. When a gorgeous new girl arrives at school and befriends Melissa, even her sister is surprised. Courtney is nothing like Melissa. But soon, Courtney is moving in on Melissa's best friend, even when Melissa assures her that she and Ryan are only friends. Ryan starts spending all of his time with Courtney and Melissa is again alone. When a popular older boy starts paying attention to her, her life starts to change drastically. Ms. Cantor writes a bittersweet story of a girl trying to deal with the loss of her father, whom she was quite close to. She also touchingly portrays the struggles Melissa faces when she comes to realize that maybe her feelings for her best friend go beyond friendship. Over the course of Melissa's year, she matures and grows in confidence and self-esteem, as those around her come to accept her for who she is - and she learns to accept herself, as well.
SpartanReading More than 1 year ago
Right before her freshman year, Mellissa’s dad passed away from cancer. Now living with her extremely beautiful mom and sister, Mellissa feels like the odd one out. Melissa always had a special connection with her dad, and as the year goes on, she tries to uncover his secret and keep a journal about relationships that he started alive. But things start to change when Melissa’s best friend Ryan starts dating another girl. Will Melissa be able to accept beauty and love into her life? Or will she get lost in the past with her fathers’ secrets and stories? I give this book 4 out of 5 stars, because the characteristics and the thoughts of the characters seem so real, and the story is relatable to real life. I would recommend this book to any girl who enjoys realistic fiction. I would recommend this to girls because not only is the book in a girls perspective, but it deals with lots of topics about beauty and love. Melissa has to deal with her mother, who started dating again, and her sister, who enters in a beauty contest. Also I would recommend this to anyone who likes realistic fiction, because the more you relate the book to your life the more you feel in the story. In the story Melissa deals with her best friend leaving her, everyone can relate to someone leaving you. Also she has to deal with moving on from the past, something she finds hard, but you can really connect to her thoughts.
gubry on LibraryThing 25 days ago
When her father talks about the life of glass, I found it really interesting. The things that her father knew were very unique to read so it was a plus when reading this book. It's a nice coming of age story, apart from the fact that Melissa is slowly getting over her grief.This book had a lot of stories going on, so the characters very developed because you got to hear about Ryan's, Ashley's, and Courtney's story so it's interesting. The story also broke away from what you see from the person at first, for example Melissa's aunt who you think is supposed to be uptight, but instead there's more to her. I did find the Sally Bedford mystery, although interesting, a bit strange to add in.Melissa's a real character and an easy one to relate to. Despite all this, I couldn't exactly get in to the story for some reason, I don't know why. I did find myself irritated at Melissa at the end. The ending wrapped up the book nicely, but somehow I didn't exactly enjoy it. Oh well, this was a nice book to read and I will read the other books the author has.
59Square on LibraryThing 25 days ago
Kearsten says: Melissa begins high school still grieving over her father's death. Through the year, she gains strength to deal with falling for her best friend Ryan, high school troubles and new friend problems by reading and rereading her father's journal.Melissa and her sister have a hard time with their mother's foray back into the dating scene, but Melissa seems to struggle most with being the 'plain' one in the family. Both her mother and sister are beauties, and their focus on their looks and attempts to 'pretty' Melissa up cause friction, which I found believable. And while I liked the play between Melissa and her best friend Ryan, I can't help but roll my eyes at yet another boy/girl best-friendship turning into a love match. Why must we still buy into the When Harry Met Sally assertion that men and women can't be friends without falling in love?Melissa coming to terms with her father's death is at the core of the story, and it is a bit heartbreaking to go on the journey with her.Recommended.
stephxsu on LibraryThing 25 days ago
14-year-old Melissa¿s life has not been easy after the death of her father almost two years ago. Her older and more glamorous sister Ashley pretends they¿re not related, their mother is already dating someone new, and Melissa¿s best friend Ryan has been acting stupid over the gorgeous new girl, Courtney.Melissa often turns to her father¿s journals, reading them for a sliver of his thoughts and wisdom. But as her freshman year progresses, she begins to learn that people, even those who are dead, can change over time, including herself.With all the contemporary YA fiction out there, it¿s become increasingly harder to find one that stands out. Fortunately, there is one in THE LIFE OF GLASS. Easily readable and touching, Jillian Cantor¿s second book is a must-read for fans of Sarah Dessen.The first thing one notices when reading THE LIFE OF GLASS is the ease and confidence with which Jillian Cantor writes Melissa¿s voice. Melissa feels like a completely real high school freshman girl: some situations make her uncomfortable, and when all else fails, she tends to close into herself, but her eyes, ears, and¿most importantly, the element that is often missing in realistic YA fiction¿brain are constantly open, observing and learning from the world around her. If you ever felt shy, awkward, or confused as a freshman, then you¿ll be able to relate to Melissa.Actually, all of the characters in this book are spectacularly written. All of them run the risk of falling into ¿types¿: Courtney the manipulative and fake new girl, Ashley the bitchy older sister, and so on. Yet not one of them, including the most minor of minor characters, is flat. Each character leaps off the page and confidently takes his or her spot on center stage when it is his or her turn. It made reading THE LIFE OF GLASS hugely enjoyable.Admittedly the post-death coming-of-age plot is a bit tired, but Jillian¿s skills as a writer make sure that readers will never feel the need to put this book down. Don¿t underestimate this unassuming book or you¿ll regret it!
haleyknitz on LibraryThing 25 days ago
Melissa¿s father died almost two years ago. She has been struggling, but is surviving with the help of her best friend Ryan. But through a series of events, her world gets turned upside down. A new girl comes to school and befriends her immediately, for some unknown reason. Ryan gets a girlfriend. Melissa¿s mom is dating some guy. Ashley, her older sister, is¿ well just being an annoying older sister with problems. And in the middle of it all, Melissa still has unsolved mysteries about her father, her desires, and herself.The Life of Glass is a fast read¿I tore through it in a matter of hours. I wasn¿t particularly sure why I couldn¿t stop reading it. Maybe it was the easy language, maybe it was the characters, maybe I was just in the mood for a good romance novel and that was what was on my shelf. Either way, I didn¿t stop reading until my sister turned the light out on me.I liked the characters a lot (though some of them I despised) and others remained mysteries until later in the book; they were those ¿oh I had no idea they were that kind of person¿ characters, and I liked the mystery of their personalities. They were relatable and likeable, the ending was nice. It wasn¿t perfect, but it was nice.That being said, there was nothing hugely spectacular about The Life of Glass: nothing that will make it a long lasting fantastic memory or escape for me. I enjoyed it and I won¿t forget it, but it won¿t be one of those ¿second reads.¿ This was part of the 1 ARC Tours for Bloody Bad.
kayceel on LibraryThing 25 days ago
Melissa begins high school still grieving over her father's death. Through the year, she gains strength to deal with falling for her best friend Ryan, high school troubles and new friend problems by reading and rereading her father's journal.Melissa and her sister have a hard time with their mother's foray back into the dating scene, but Melissa seems to struggle most with being the 'plain' one in the family. Both her mother and sister are beauties, and their focus on their looks and attempts to 'pretty' Melissa up cause friction, which I found believable. And while I liked the play between Melissa and her best friend Ryan, I can't help but roll my eyes at yet another boy/girl best-friendship turning into a love match. Why must we still buy into the When Harry Met Sally assertion that men and women can't be friends without falling in love?Melissa coming to terms with her father's death is at the core of the story, and it is a bit heartbreaking to go on the journey with her.Recommended.
Gabrielle_Bernal More than 1 year ago
What would you do if all that remained of your father after he passed was a journal that never truly ended? Melissa, the main character in the Life of Glass; faces this task of piecing together the clues from her father’s journal in attempts to keep her father’s presence around. The Life of Glass is a inspiring story and truly captivating. The book deals with the ups and downs of life and the struggles that we all face. The Life of Glass is a realistic fiction novel that can truly relate to the younger teens. The developing story of characters and the mystery will draw you in and you’ll wish it continued more than 352 pages. The Life of Glass is a touching journey of a teenager that is brilliantly written by Jillian Cantor. Throughout this book, Melissa faces the newly daunting task of trying to deal with life without her father while being suspended into freshman year. While her mom and sister are off doing their own things; Melissa chases the questions left behind when she discovers a hidden note inside her father’s journals. Leading you through the mystery and sorrow left behind her father; The Life of Glass is a good read and makes you feel as if you are there with Melissa in her journey. The Life of Glass is a title that can be interpreted many ways before reading. It could relate to the characters, the situation, or even just the smallest details. Jillian Cantor did an amazing job at expressing the feelings of characters and making them feel real. The characters all have their own backstories and are very defined. It truly conveys the struggle of a young girl trying to find her place but yet cope at the same time. The book is written in a fashion which is easily read and understandable. Due to the issues presented in the book many early teens face the same ones making it relatable. The book paints a picture with vivid words and strong descriptions. The story provokes emotions and makes people think about their lives or their situation. It is a wonderful read and will provide you with not only a story but an experience. The story of The Life of Glass will touch you and inspire you like no other. This book is a good read to all ages but connects to younger teens more. This tale of Melissa is a unique story filled with interesting facts her father always harbored. Melissa chases the questions remaining to keep a piece of her dad around like a piece of glass. The bond Melissa has with her father is bound within the seems of a journal and it’s up to her to unravel the mystery through the tale of The Life of Glass.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ok so all of the reveiws pretty much recap the book. I really dont want to read them. Will someone just tell me if the book is worth the money nad my time. Thanks
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Some one please help
Trisketagg More than 1 year ago
Warnings, before reading this, please do take in that this review does have spoilers that could potentially ruin your chances of reading this book. This book revolves around a girl named Melissa McAllister who struggles to see the true beauty within her. With her sister Ashley and her mother being the most beautiful girls she has ever witnessed, she has a hard time seeing the beauty reflected on her outside features. During the summer of transitioning from junior high to high school, Melissa's father dies due to cancer. Throughout the book she struggles to let go of the loss of her father, but over time her boyfriend helps her to let go. From a girl left in pain and stuck in misery, Melissa realizes that her beauty has always been there inside her and that holding on to her father's death was the last thing her father would want her to be doing. What I really enjoyed from this book is that it was an easy read, but it's wasn't too painfully easy where you would come to the point of putting the book down and returning it to the library. I also liked how I could look back on my freshman year and be able to relate to the main characters struggles and confusion on so many different levels. The major moral or theme of this story was about overcoming the doubts about one's true beauty and accepting themselves for who they are. This is why I could relate to the main character on so many levels because up to today, I'm still struggling to find myself. Also as a girl, I still have insecurities and doubts that I worry about on daily basis but I'm gradually learning on how to let go of those worries and accepting towards who I am. Overall, this book can be relatable to many teenager girls and it shows that you do have the capability of accepting yourself for who you are.
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