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Life of Michael Angelo
     

Life of Michael Angelo

by Herman Friedrich Grimm
 

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Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally

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Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940021760409
Publisher:
Boston : Little, Brown
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
912 KB

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CHAPTER THIRD. 1494 1496. SaYonarola Lorenzo's Death Change of Things in Florence Irruption of the French into Italy Michael Angela's Flight to Venice Expulsion of the Medici Michael Angelo in Bologna The New Republic in Florence under Savonarola Michael Angelo's Return The Marble Cupid Journey to Rome. OINCE the murder of Giuliano, the old joyful feeling, which had once prevailed at the Med- icean court, had never returned. The feasts of Carreggi were past, when they wrote poems, made music, and studied philosophy under the shade of the laurels ; when they had banished every thought of the future with that carelessness which is so necessary to the youthful, genial enjoyment of life. And, as a change had passed over the Medici, it was so also in the minds of the Florentines themselves. For a while, the clouds obscured not the sun; but it was felt by all, that the clouds were rising. Two things were a matter of course, if we consider the position of the State: in the first place, the more Lorenzo was forced into a princely position by the mere power of circumstances, the more must the nobles of equal birth with him have feared tofall into subjection, such nobles as the Strozzi, Soderini, Capponi, and a whole series of the most powerful families; in the second place, Lorenzo himself, looking for opposition from this quarter as a natural result, no doubt endeavored the more skilfully to maintain the appearance of indifference, and thus to hold the common people more firmly on his side. Hence those constant public amusements, and the affability displayed at them. It might almost be disputed, whether it lay in his intention to make himself absolute master of the city. We know howimpressively he recommended his son never to forget that he was nothing ...

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