Life's Little College Admissions Insights: Top Tips From the Country's Most Acclaimed Guidance Counselors

Life's Little College Admissions Insights: Top Tips From the Country's Most Acclaimed Guidance Counselors

by Eric Yaverbaum, Cole Yaverbaum

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Overview

Compiled in “real time” as one family went through the college search. Life’s Little College Admission Insights best selling author and his college bound daughter have compiled an easy to read, ingest and act on “insider” best in class tips to help make the college search easier right from the beginning! The book is intended to be a “jump starter” for collegiate research and to be used before you ever pick up one of the many wonderful, yet sometimes overwhelming college directories and guides on the market today. Top experts across the country were interviewed and have given many wise and different opinions on what’s important from their own first hand experience advising hundreds of thousands of students in their careers.
After a rigorous search and selection process, professional advisors and counselors were asked the same questions including:
* The one college tip that nobody ever seems to know about;
* The first piece of advice top counselors give their own children;
* The one piece of advice they have given that’s worked best;
* What students have to do differently today from even a year ago;
* And to add a little education to the process for college bound students, advice with an SAT word in it!
Eric and Cole Yaverbaum have also given a look into their own thought process during the search and include invaluable informational resources including where to look for financial aid, a detailed timeline for when to do what, test preparation information, athletics and even the sample essay Cole used on her applications to get into college.
While many adults look back on their college years as the best time of their life, nobody ever seems to say the same about the college application and selection process. Life’s Little College Admission Insights makes the search process as enjoyable and easy as possible from day one.
Enjoy the search!

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781600377280
Publisher: Morgan James Publishing
Publication date: 01/15/2010
Pages: 144
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.50(d)

About the Author

Cole Yaverbaum, age 17, is a student at Mamaroneck High School in Westchester County. A senior, Cole is currently in search of a college herself. She is a member of student council, the National Honor Society, and several other committees and clubs at her school. In her spare time she enjoys biking, reading, writing, and practicing piano. Although this is her first published book, she aspires to pursue her writing career in college.

Eric wrote the best-selling book I’ll Get Back to You. He is also the author of the first and second editions of Public Relations For Dummies, which is required reading in marketing classes at 57 universities in the United States. His third book, Leadership Secrets of the World’s Most Successful CEOs  has been translated into 13 languages. His last book, Everything Leadership, came out in May 2008. He is also a frequent talk-show guest on national and regional television and radio programs and networks, including CBS This Morning, Today, CNN, Larry King Live, Your World with Neil Cavuto, MSNBC, and CW11 and is currently a regular on Fox News’ Strategy Room.
Eric was an active member of the highly selective Young President’s Organization for over a decade, where he was the Chapter Chairman in New York City. His widely acclaimed “Walk a Mile in My Shoes” campaign helped push increased spending on stem cell research through the House and led to his being named one of the heroes of the public relations industry by Industry Bible PRWeek. Eric currently sits on the board of advisers for the Accelerated Cure Project for Multiple Sclerosis, where he received the prestigious Water Cove Award in October of 2009.

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

What is one college tip that nobody ever seems to know?

Do not visit your first college choice first. Students should save the first choice for somewhere in the middle or for the last visit, so they have many other schools to compare it to before visiting their first choice.

Robert Bardwell Secondary-Level Vice President, American School Counselor Association President, New England Association for College Admission Counseling School Counselor and Director of Guidance & Student Support Services Monson High School Monson, Massachusetts

In order to qualify for need-based financial aid, you need to fill out the FAFSA. You should file prior to February 15th.

Valerie Simmons, MEd School Counselor Pennsylvania

Most colleges will host students for an overnight visit once they are accepted. This really helps you decide if a college is right for you and reduces the likelihood of a transfer.

Cristiana M. Quinn, MEd College Admission Advisors, LLC Providence, Rhode Island

Don't follow the "you never know" philosophy of the college admissions process. Translated, that means: don't apply to a lot of colleges you know are beyond your reach.

Betsy Sherwood Guidance Counselor Tappan Zee High School Orangeburg, New York

College should not be a competition, but a match.

Deborah Hardy, EdD Chairperson of Guidance and Counseling Department Irvington School District Irvington, New York

Make your "name" your email address for college communication.

Jeannie Borin, MEd President College Connections Encino, California

Pay attention to the guidelines colleges offer as to what kind of student they are looking for. No one seems to anticipate that terrible feeling one gets when reading the "denied" letters. It is painful.

Betsy Sherwood Guidance Counselor Tappan Zee High School Orangeburg, New York

The students who do the right things are going to get the admission and scholarship offers — there is no "fate" or personal validation built into the college admissions process, no points for suffering in silence.

Keith Berman, CEP President Options for College, Inc.
New York, New York

Students should have eight first choices. Prioritizing before you get in closes minds.

Joyce Slayton Mitchell Author
8 First Choices: An Expert's Strategies for Getting into College
College Advice U.S.A.
New York, New York

Thank your admissions rep. After a visit, go "old school" and send a handwritten postcard from your hometown/state, thanking them for their time. What's old is new again.

Robert F. Kennedy Counselor/Post-Grad Coordinator Smoky Hill High School Aurora, Colorado

Ask for an appointment to interview with a human being and tour the college. Bring along items that make you unique to show off: portfolios of your articles, poems, songs, awards, speeches. Make sure you're one candidate for admission they won't forget! Then follow up with a note of appreciation.

Livia Sklar Guidance Counselor Bronx Aerospace Academy High School Bronx, New York

Colleges do not like to admit students who are unlikely to attend. They make assumptions about strong students who express no interest in a school whatsoever. If a student has not communicated with a school at all except to apply there, they may not get in, even if their statistics are way above what the college is looking for.

Betsy Sherwood Guidance Counselor Tappan Zee High School Orangeburg, New York

CONTACT! Make contact with the colleges you are really serious about.

Nathan J. Heltzel School Counselor Briarcliff High School Briarcliff Manor, New York

Admissions officers aren't looking for reasons to reject you. They're looking at your application and trying to get comfortable with the idea of accepting you.

Scott Shrum Co-Author
Your MBA Game Plan:
Proven Strategies for Getting into the Top Business Schools

Director of MBA Admissions Research Veritas Prep Malibu, California

For a variety of reasons, students don't take advantage of the summer and often regret the lost opportunity when the rush of activities kicks in at the start of the school year. Reminding students at the end of the school year about the benefits of using the summer months can go a long way towards alleviating major stress in the fall

William Slocum Guidance Counselor Lenape High School Medford, New Jersey

The college search process is NOT supposed to be a damaging experience. Create a list of schools that includes reaches, targets, and safeties, with a heavy hand on the safeties.

-Betsy Sherwood Guidance Counselor Tappan Zee High School Orangeburg, New York

Students in the creative and performing arts don't seem to know that they can request to take a music lesson or a dance class or whatever class that relates to whatever they plan to study in the arts when they visit a college or university. Of course, they have to request this in advance of their visit.

Judy Zodda Zodda College Services Framingham, Massachusetts

Parents and students who do speak and get everything out on the table have the best perspective on things and fare the best in the process, without question; their stress levels are exponentially lower and they end up making the best decisions.

Philip M. Kavanagh District Director of Guidance and Counseling Lakeland Central School District Shrub Oak, New York

A great time to take a subject test is after an AP exam.

Mandee Adler Founder and Principal International College Counselors Hollywood, Florida

If financial aid is a concern for a family, then they should be investigating how each college handles financial aid before choosing a college. For example, most families assume that the expected family contribution number from the FAFSA will be the amount that they will be expected to pay. However, this is only true for those colleges that provide 100% of need. Most colleges do not provide this level of financial aid and instead practice "gapping," whereby they only give the student a certain percentage of their need. By focusing on colleges that provide more financial aid, the student can save thousands of dollars each year.

Todd Johnson College Admissions Partners Minnetonka, Minnesota

The one thing that parents and students forget is that there are more than 3,500 colleges in the US and there is more than one perfect college for a child.

Emilie Hinman Dunbar Educational Consultants New Canaan, Connecticut

Private colleges can potentially be equally as affordable as public options, depending on financial and merit-based aid.

Kiersten A. Murphy, MEd Murphy College Consultants, LLC Seattle/Bellevue, Washington

You are the customer, not the school.

Kristina L. Dooley Independent Educational Consultant Estrela Consulting São Paulo, Brazil

College admission officers are usually very skilled at "reading" students, so do not think of the college admission process as a game and try to fake your interest in the school.

Marilyn G.S. Emerson, MSW, CEP Independent Educational Consultants Association College Planning Services, Inc.
Chappaqua, New York

When you've got your first short list of colleges, decide on your number one choice. If it isn't on Common App, then write the essay first. While Common App is your friend, not all colleges use it and if that is the case, you need to decide what your top choices are to focus your admissions questions appropriately.

Elisabeth Marksteiner College Counselor & Alumni Relations International School of Zug and Luzern Zug, Switzerland

Colleges are looking for good citizens as well as good scholars. I try to impress upon my students the importance of ensuring that the colleges know something about your character as well as your SATs.

Don Dietrich Director of College Guidance Tower Hill School Wilmington, Delaware

College admission officers need to "feel the love." Don't just tell them by applying early action, show them by multiple contacts!

Nathan J. Heltzel School Counselor Briarcliff High School Briarcliff Manor, New York

It is ok to use "I" in your college essay.

Kiersten A. Murphy, MEd Murphy College Consultants, LLC Seattle/Bellevue, Washington

The biggest issue we struggle with is the misinformation from other parents who think they know what is going on and are not that informed.

Keith Elmore Counselor for Gifted Students Liberty High School Liberty, Missouri

College is not a "bumper sticker" or a "sweatshirt" game, but the next journey in life to prepare for the global workforce.

Deborah Hardy, EdD Chairperson of Guidance and Counseling Department Irvington School District Irvington, New York

Begin the process of self-discovery earlier than the summer/fall before senior year. The educational planning process takes time and more often than not, the process evolves over the course of that time. Waiting until the last minute to fill out applications makes for weak decisions in the college decision making and college-planning processes.

Jean Marie Buckley, MEd, MPA Founder and President Buckley Educational Group, LLC Burlingame, California

If you are considering a college that has tough admission standards, consider applying to a less competitive school your freshman year and transferring to the more competitive school later during your college career. Most highly competitive colleges admit a higher percentage of students after the frenzy of freshman year. Remember, it's not where you start your college education that employers ask you about, it's where you finish your degree.

Jennifer Muffick School Counselor J.I. Case High School Racine, Wisconsin

Be your child's "clerical concierge." Make a file box before freshman year. Quietly collect everything your kid will otherwise lose: standardized test results, transcripts, sports awards, community-service hours.

Kris Hintz Owner Position U 4 College, LLC New Vernon, New Jersey

CHAPTER 2

What is the first piece of advice you would give to your own child about getting into college?

Demonstrated interest is becoming more and more popular among colleges as a way to make sure the students they accept will likely attend (which impacts yield), as well as whether he should get scholarships/financial aid.

Robert Bardwell Secondary-Level Vice President, American School Counselor Association President, New England Association for College Admission Counseling School Counselor and Director of Guidance & Student Support Services Monson High School Monson, Massachusetts

Decide who you want to be before you decide where you want to go: the best applications are from applicants who have interests that truly match the strength of a school.

Mandee Adler Founder and Principal International College Counselors Hollywood, Florida

Students need to understand that colleges look at grades mostly from 9th to 11th grade.

Valerie Simmons, MEd School Counselor Pennsylvania

Don't worry about the price tag of the school at first; we'll work on the finances later.

Livia Sklar Guidance Counselor Bronx Aerospace Academy High School Bronx, New York

For students who are weaker academically, applying early can be the difference between getting accepted or rejected by a college.

Valerie Simmons, MEd School Counselor Pennsylvania

While most students are anxious about getting into college, most colleges are equally anxious about getting students.

Philip M. Kavanagh District Director of Guidance and Counseling Lakeland Central School District Shrub Oak, New York

The last thing a college applicant should do is frantically start joining clubs and doing activities in his or her junior year — by then it's too late.

Scott Shrum Co-Author
Your MBA Game Plan:
Proven Strategies for Getting into the Top Business Schools
Director of MBA Admissions Research Veritas Prep Malibu, California

Kids today are deluged with mail from hundreds of schools. They're solicited by colleges as early as ninth grade. It's important for them to realize that colleges are businesses that are looking for customers, so the kids need to be savvy consumers.

Livia Sklar Guidance Counselor Bronx Aerospace Academy High School New York, New York

College rankings do not promise a better college experience, competitive career placements, or higher salaries.

Lisa McDonald Counselor Chicago, Illinois

The college search journey has to be self-driven. Parents and counselors can and should be a resource for the young adult, but the force behind the search cannot be external.

William Slocum Guidance Counselor Lenape High School Medford, New Jersey

Most students can be happy at either a big or a small school. Often, at the end of the process, when students are trying to decide which place to go, size is not an important factor. It's that "gut feeling" that one has when on a particular campus that usually determines the choice.

Betsy Sherwood Guidance Counselor Tappan Zee High School Orangeburg, New York

"Getting into college" starts in 9th grade. That's when to start working to your potential and identifying your intellectual and extracurricular passions.

Lora K. Block, MA, CEP Independent Educational Consultants Association Bennington, Vermont

Learning to enjoy the college admissions process, not just "survive" it, totally changes the dynamics in very positive ways. I believe it can also change the outcome.

Ronna Morrison Independent Educational Consultants Association Ronna Morrison Associates Demarest, New Jersey

Begin your high school career taking the most challenging courses that are offered in your high school and that are appropriate for your academic abilities, and continue that through your senior year.

The transcript is the most important part of the application.

Farron Goddell Peatross, MA, CEP Independent Educational Consultants Association Memphis, Tennessee

Hard work works! If you have a strong work ethic, your success is enhanced in every area of your life. Regardless of your intellectual abilities, the ability to work hard enriches your life and opens doors to college opportunities.

Keith Elmore Counselor for Gifted Students Liberty High School Liberty, Missouri

Where you go matters if you know who you are and what you want before you go.

Keith Berman, CEP President Options for College, Inc.
New York, New York

If it feels good and it has what you want, go for it.

Don Dietrich Director of College Guidance Tower Hill School Wilmington, Delaware

Don't forsake your passion(s) at the expense of your academics. Become a student of what you love.

Jessica Sharkey, MEd College Pathways of Arizona Arizona

Do not place emphasis on a college's name; instead, evaluate the academic offerings of the school and remember what is most important is what you do with the four years you spend in college.

Marilyn G.S. Emerson, MSW, CEP Independent Educational Consultants Association College Planning Services, Inc.
Chappaqua, New York

Making the location of a school of primary importance may make someone miss some wonderful place that would be perfect for them.

Betsy Sherwood Guidance Counselor Tappan Zee High School Orangeburg, New York

The important thing is to find a school that empowers you and helps you grow as a scholar and as an individual.

Cristiana M. Quinn, MEd College Admission Advisors, LLC Providence, Rhode Island

Do what makes you happy. Don't base your college choices on what makes your parents happy or on where your friends are going. Find the school that is right for you based on your choice of major and the college demographics that work for you.

Jennifer Muffick School Counselor J.I. Case High School Racine, Wisconsin

Choosing the right classes — a challenging curriculum but one where you can still maintain good grades — and taking your studies seriously begins in ninth grade. Most ninth graders, having just left junior high, do not have college on their minds.

Janet Rosier Professional Member Independent Educational Consultants Association and Higher Education Consultants Association Woodbridge, Connecticut

Students today are so over programmed that they become automatons, often unable to eat without verifying they have five minutes to spare between jazz flute and batontwirling lessons. This scheduling frenzy causes many students to lose focus on what their true passions are. In so doing, they seek a college that will provide them with the inside track to the good life rather than an environment that provides opportunities to develop their established interests and create new ones.

Heath Einstein Associate Director of College Counseling The Hockaday School Dallas, Texas

You may find that a gap year helps you get into the college you could not get into before! No college classroom can teach responsibility, accountability, time management, team building, and leadership skills like a year in a service-related gap-year program can. A gap-year program can perhaps lend a helping hand to the student in deciding what major they would like to pursue and build bridges toward internship opportunities during college and job networking after college.

(Continues…)


Excerpted from "Life's Little College Admissions Insights"
by .
Copyright © 2010 Eric and Cole Yaverbaum.
Excerpted by permission of Morgan James Publishing.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

Dedication,
Acknowledgements,
Foreword,
Introduction,
Chapter One What is one college tip that nobody ever seems to know?,
Chapter Two What is the first piece of advice you would give to your own child about getting into college?,
Chapter Three What is the one piece of advice you've given that's worked best for people?,
Chapter Four What do students have to do differently today from one year ago, in terms of college admissions?,
Chapter Five Do you have a tip that includes an SAT word?,
Chapter Six Pearls of wisdom,
Chapter Seven Parting advice,
Resources,
College Timeline,
Financial Aid/Scholarships,
College Life,
Test Prep,
Athletics,
Other Resources,
Sample College Essay,
About the Authors,

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