Little Altars Everywhere

Little Altars Everywhere

by Rebecca Wells
3.8 49

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Little Altars Everywhere 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 47 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Despite the less than flattering title I gave this review, I do recommend reading it. This is not a traditional novel with a specific beginning, middle, and end, but rather a collection of stories--funny, sad, and, yes, horrific--told from the viewpoints of various family members growing up on a plantation in Louisiana in the early 1960's. The book was split in two sections, with the second half devoted to the now adult children of Vivi and Big Shep and how they turned out after leaving the fold. While Well's stories reflected a range of emotional ups and downs, I think she did a good job of capturing the realities of growing up in an abusive, alcoholic household. Every disagreement is over the top and threatens violence. Every mildly funny moment is rolling on the floor laughter. In short, every reaction is to the extreme. And kids living in the middle of it, simply accept it as a fact of life--what else can they do? I did, however, have one big problem with this book and that was in tying it to Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood, which I had read first several years ago. Divine Secrets painted Vivi, the matriarch, as complex and difficult at times, but not necessarily detestable. Little Altars, however, made her a monster--and the worst kind of a monster--the kind people just shrug off, ignore, or whose monstrous behavior simply gets buried or explained away. I have to say after reading Little Altars Everywhere, I had a lot of trouble with Well's seeming celebration of the Ya-Ya's and their notion of 'sisterhood'. Surely these women all knew the abusive bent of their leader Vivi, but like the doctors who looked the other way at Siddalee's whipping marks when they treated her for her asthma, they seemed to simply ignore it. In my book that's not sisterhood--that's just plain sick. I know movies often stray far from the storyline of the book, but after reading 'Little Altars', I'm glad I never saw Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood--because I would end up hating all these women for their collusion. Enough said--read it anyway. If nothing else, it is certainly a thought-provoking collection of childhood memories.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Spectacular
sunnyreads More than 1 year ago
I was pleasantly surprised with this book. Having read Rebecca Wells' work before I knew I was in for a fun romp. However I was touched by the deep and unspoken scars left by the Mother's actions on each character, and was taken down a road of dysfunction, neglect, abuse and ultimately acceptance, healing and recovery. A must read for any "former child" who had a difficult road or just if one is looking for an entertaining look at the human heart and soul, in all their complex forms.
Guest More than 1 year ago
SUMMARY Little Altars Everywhere is an incredible sequel to the book The Ya Ya Sisterhood. The book starts with Sidda again, and she is telling one of her childhood memories from long ago. Each chapter begins a new story from a character¿s point of view. There is not one main topic for this book because it is a collection of the family members¿ memories. The characters that were in this book were Sidda Lee, the oldest daughter, Lulu, the middle child, Baylor, the second to oldest kid, Little Shep, the youngest child out of all of them, Shep, the father, their mother, and Willetta the maid. This book is more outrageous than the last because there is physical abuse, sexual abuse, a lesbian scene, shoplifting, and stupid things the characters said and did without even thinking. I was baffled when I finished the book because so much information is jam packed into a small novel, and someone like me can¿t comprehend everything that happened throughout the book because I guess you could say I¿m a little more naïve than the author. Rebecca Wells writes with such intensity that it was a little too much for a 13 year old to handle. I don¿t normally read about such adventurous and unusual event occurring so when I read the book I was definitely shocked in a big way. LIKES//DISLIKES Rebecca Wells, the author, had a very strong voice in each of the characters. She was very blunt and to the point when she told the characters¿ point of view. As a result, many swear words were used to match the father and mother¿s personality, and later on in the book as time went by the kids grew up and spoke in the same manner. She spoke in first person, making the characters in her story very realistic and intimidating. I would never approach anyone from the Walker family because they had, well, their issues. The vocabulary is somewhat difficult because I would come along unfamiliar words every once in a while but if I compared it to the words around it, then the word made sense. I really enjoyed the book for its challenging vocabulary because most books I read are way too easy and a challenge is a good way for me to exercise my brain. This book comes across as very unique to me because it is the only book I¿ve ever read that is split into sections of separate stories, stating the character telling the story and the time too. It made it seem like it was actual history from a real family. I could honestly say that this book was the most helpful when I wanted to analyze the reasons for the characters actions because they explain everything themselves and they give you ideas but it was not good for picturing each scene happening mainly because when a person describes something they just aren¿t going to describe what everything looked like so vividly and how it all happened. In Little Altars Everywhere the characters just speak like I would in a conversation so detail wise, it wasn¿t too helpful. BOOK RATING I really think Little Altars Everywhere earns 10 out of 10 stars. It was just so interesting, I mean really I know I say that about every book I read but none add up to this. I can guarantee you there isn¿t another book as good as this one. Rebecca Wells was given a gift and she really used it to her advantage because her books have sold like at least millions and millions of copies. She just came up with a random idea, the Ya Ya Sisterhood and built off of that. I don¿t know many people that can do that: come up with and idea and build a book series off of it. She seriously spent a lot of hard work and time to write this book and I think everyone should read it. On the recommendation part I suggest people any gender over the age of 13 unless you happen to be really mature. The conflicts are just way too confusing and mature for a little kid to understand. Most young children are shielded from the bad things in this world, and this book probably has like all of those inappropriate topics in there throughout the whole book. FINAL THOUGHTS I r
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A-READER24 More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this book up until the 'Snuggling' chapter, then I quit reading. I don't see the point in ruining the Vivi character, and I think it even tarnished my opinion of "Divine Secrets'. I don't see how Little Shep or even Sidda could even talk to Vivi after what she did. I don't think they would in real life.
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