The Little Blue Book of Advertising: 52 Small Ideas That Can Make a Big Difference

The Little Blue Book of Advertising: 52 Small Ideas That Can Make a Big Difference

by Steve Lance, Jeff Woll

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Overview

The Little Blue Book of Advertising: 52 Small Ideas That Can Make a Big Difference by Steve Lance, Jeff Woll

These days, the fundamentals of advertising that truly build great brands are often overlooked. But Steve Lance and Jeff Woll are leading a back-to-what-works movement with The Little Blue Book of Advertising.

This is a short, fun-to-read, practical book designed to be read quickly and referred to again and again. Each of their fifty-two ideas relates to day-to-day problems with real examples, then provides an innovative, sometimes blunt solution. For instance:

  • #3 Read what your customer reads, watch what she watches

  • #10 Quality is the absence of nonquality signals

  • #15 Sell the benefit, the advantage, and the feature—in that order

  • #19 Get the no-bodies out of your approval process

  • #41 Know when and how to scream “sale”

Just as Jeffrey Gitomer’s hugely successful The Little Red Book of Selling became the gotta-have resource for salespeople, Steve Lance and Jeff Woll have written the perfect handbook for what does and doesn’t work in today’s advertising world.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781591841241
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 07/06/2006
Pages: 288
Product dimensions: 5.25(w) x 7.35(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Steve Lance and Jeff Woll are partners at Unconventional Wisdom, a creative resource group. Lance was formerly a creative director with Della Femina, Travisano & Partnersand creative director of NBC. Woll was a twenty-year veteran of OgilvyWorldwide, including stints as COO of their Montreal office and CEO of Ogilvy & Mather Partners in New York. Both authors have won numerous industry awards.

Jeff Woll and Steve Lance are partners at Unconventional Wisdom, a creative resource group. Lance was formerly a creative director with Della Femina, Travisano & Partnersand creative director of NBC. Woll was a twenty-year veteran of OgilvyWorldwide, including stints as COO of their Montreal office and CEO of Ogilvy & Mather Partners in New York. Both authors have won numerous industry awards.

Table of Contents

The Little Blue Book of AdvertisingIntroduction

Point of View #1:
Marketers and Creatives Don't Speak the Same Language

Point of View #2:
Think Inside the Box

Point of View #3:
You Can't Manage What You Don't Measure

Section One: Know Your Customer, Know Your Brand

Tip 1: Know Who Your Customers Are
Tip 2: Live and Die by the 80/20 Rule
Tip 3: Read What Your Customer Reads, Watch What She Watches
Tip 4: Know Your Brand Image
Tip 5: Be an Expert on the Benefits of Your Product or Service
Tip 6: Do You Know the Brand History?
Tip 7: Does Everyone Know the Competitive History?

Section Two: What's Your Objective?

Tip 8: Know Where You Want to Take the Brand
Tip 9: Map a Clear Route of How You'll Take Your Brand to the Destination
Tip 10: Quality Is the Absence of Non-Quality Signals

Section Three: Where Do You Want to Go?

Tip 11: Do Quantitative Research
Tip 12: Never Give the Gun to the Dog
Tip 13: Don't Make Focus Groups Your Creative Director

Section Four: A Great Advertising Strategy Is the Hidden Gem

Tip 14: "My Company's Great! My Products Are Terrific!" Besides You, Who Cares?
Tip 15: Sell the Benefit, the Advantage, and the Feature—in That Order
Tip 16: Separate Your Brand from the Competition
Tip 17: Make Sure All Your Advertising Speaks with One Voice

Section Five: The Creative Director—the Creative Process

Tip 18: Guide and Manage, Don't Design and Write
Tip 19: Get the "No-Bodies" Out of Your Approval Process
Tip 20: Walk the Halls
Tip 21: Share Information
Tip 22: Partner with the Research Department—They'll Lead You to the Consumer Every Time
Tip 23: Make Friends with a Media Planner
Tip 24: Become an Expert on the Consumer
Tip 25: Monthly Luncheon Learning Sessions
Tip 26: Watch Videos and Go to the Movies Together
Tip 27: Underpromise and Overdeliver
Tip 28: Know What Your Suppliers Are Talking About
Tip 29: Learn New Tricks

Section Six: TV Commercials

Tip 30: Shit, My Hair's on Fire!
Tip 31: Don't Forget the Benefit
Tip 32: Tell 'em, Sell 'em, and Tell 'em Again
Tip 33: Tell 'em Who Told 'em
Tip 34: The Younger the Audience, the More Cuts You Can Use
Tip 35: Create Advertising That Gets Talked About or Used in Everyday Conversation

Section Seven: Print Advertising

Tip 36: Don't Hide Your Brand Name
Tip 37: Talk to Your Customers in Their Own Language
Tip 38: Put a Benefit in the Headline
Tip 39: White Space Is Valuable
Tip 40: Long Copy Can Sell
Tip 41: Know When and How to Scream SALE!

Section Eight: The Internet

Tip 42: Make the Navigation to Your Selling Page As Easy As Possible
Tip 43: Blogs—Still Lots of Learning to Be Done

Section Nine: Radio, Outdoor, and Direct Response

Tip 44: Radio: Tell a Story
Tip 45: Outdoor: Make It Simple, Big and Memorable
Tip 46: Direct Response: Get the List Right
Tip 47: Test Different Offers Against the Benchmark—One Variable at a Time

Section Ten: On the Set

Tip 48: Never Leave the Set Until the Shooting Board Has Been Covered
Tip 49: Let the People You Hired Do Their Jobs
Tip 50: Allow for the Possibility of Magic
Tip 51: Leave an Open Mike to the Voice-over Talent
Tip 52: Don't Leave Issues to be Solved in the Editing Room

Section Eleven: Bonus

Tip 53: Have Fun

What People are Saying About This

Jerry Della Femina

Filled with those 'Why didn't I think of that?' truths that make it a must-read for everyone working in advertising.

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Little Blue Book of Advertising: 52 Small Ideas That Can Make a Big Difference 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Excellent book. It's not for juniors, it's moreso for senior-level people such as Creative Directors. The advice is real and works wonders.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In this advertising how-to guide, ad agency partners Steve Lance and Jeff Woll advocate using tried-and-true marketing methods and, more important than doing things differently, doing them right. And, they do things quite right. Their text is a wonderful refresher for those already in marketing, advertising and promotion, and it is also a general introduction for anyone entering these fields. Lance and Woll use humor and down-to-earth good sense when dispensing advice on advertising basics: defining your brand, knowing your audience, conducting research, differentiating your product and creating effective advertising for a variety of mediums. While the book is repetitive and choppy at times, and the pithy copy is sometimes simplistic, the message is loud and clear. If the authors¿ experience has taught them anything (and between them, they have more than six decades worth), it¿s that executing the fundamentals better than your competition will make you and your company successful every time. That¿s why getAbstract suggests that you get comfortable inside the box, as you curl up with this handy manual.
Guest More than 1 year ago
No matter how often you have been told to think outside the box, I stress (after three decades as a creative) that there¿s a lot still inside the box. In fact, our box is positively stuffed with great ideas `cause a huge number of creative people have been stuffing the damn thing for years and years. Each year, colleagues and clients have urged me to read the latest book about the ¿new marketing,¿ a long line of them from Marketing Warfare to Crossing the Chasm to The Tipping Point. I started way back with Antony Jay¿s books, Management & Machiavelli (1968) and Corporation Man (1971). I still think Corporation Man is one of the best books ever written about corporate life. I have to agree with Steve Lance and Jeff Woll in their new work, The Little Blue Book of Advertising: ¿¿there¿s no such thing at new marketing.¿ They point out there are four basic questions you can ask, if you¿d just step back and think about your creative or marketing challenge. ¿What are we doing?¿ ¿How are we doing it?¿ ¿Why are we doing it?¿ and ¿How do we know if it¿s working.¿ The answers to these foundation questions are already inside the box: hundreds or even thousands of creative ideas, concepts, promotions and programs that have been thought up and produced since small-type ads for fresh fish appeared in Colonial American newspapers. Think of what¿s inside the box as Advertising¿s evergreen present to you ¿ and your career¿s future.
Guest More than 1 year ago
'The Little Blue Book of Adveritsing' isn't about advertising theory it's about maximizing advertising creativity and results. It's a must read no matter how much or how little you spend on advertising.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This handy little book is filled with a lifetime of experience all boiled down into a highly readable set of tips and truisms. Someone new to advertising will find a gold-mine in here and someone who's been in the business will be re-focused on the essentials of creating great advertising.
tommy74 More than 1 year ago
not very good