Little Lord Fauntleroy

Little Lord Fauntleroy

by Frances Hodgson Burnett
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Overview

Little Lord Fauntleroy by Frances Hodgson Burnett

One very special boy weaves some magic in Frances Hodgson Burnett’s sentimental favorite. When young Cedric Errol learns that he is actually a British lord and heir to an estate, his life is transformed. He leaves Boston for Dorincourt Castle to live with his uncle, the Earl—a tyrant who’s loathed by one and all. Will Cedric succeed in melting his cold, cruel uncle’s heart?

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780553212020
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Publication date: 01/01/1987
Series: Classics Series
Pages: 192

About the Author

Frances Eliza Hodgson Burnett (24 November 1849 - 29 October 1924) was a British-American novelist and playwright. She is best known for the three children's novels Little Lord Fauntleroy (published in 1885-1886), A Little Princess (1905), and The Secret Garden (1911).

Frances Eliza Hodgson was born in Cheetham, Manchester, England. After her father died in 1852, the family fell on straitened circumstances and in 1865 emigrated to the United States, settling near Knoxville, Tennessee. There Frances began writing to help earn money for the family, publishing stories in magazines from the age of 19. In 1870, her mother died, and in 1872 Frances married Swan Burnett, who became a medical doctor.

Read an Excerpt

The Connecticut countryside, 1849

The grave was dug. Carefully, Lucas Whitaker hammered small metal tacks into the top of the coffin lid to form his mother's initials: H.W., for Hannah Whitaker. Then he stood up to straighten his tired back. All that was left was to lower the pine box into the cold, hard ground and cover it with dirt.

But Lucas didn't move. He stared blindly at the double line of grave markers in the little family burial ground. There were the graves of two infants, his brother and sister, each of whom had died so soon after birth that Lucas could scarcely remember anything about them except the sight of their tiny, red fists waving in the air and the sound of their feeble crying.

Their graves were so small that the fieldstones stuck in the ground to mark their heads and feet were no farther apart than the length of Lucas's arm.

Next were the stones marking the place where Lucas's Uncle Asa was buried. Asa had died of consumption two years before. Soon after, Lucas's sister Lizy, just four years old, had fallen to the same dread disease.

When they'd buried Lizy, Lucas and his father had worked together in stunned silence, afraid to think about, much less speak about, the mysterious way in which the sickness could sweep through a household taking one family member after another.

That night Lucas's mother had clasped him to her, weeping. "How long shall I be allowed to keep you?" she'd whispered.

But the next to be afflicted had not been Lucas. He shuddered as he remembered the way the large, powerful man who had been his father had turned slowly into a thin, pale stranger, too weak to stand. Until at last Lucas, working alone on ahot August day, tears mingling with the sweat of his labor, had buried his father, too.

Now, standing on the rocky hillside by his mother's grave, with the raw wind of late February tearing at his hair and clothing, Lucas felt nothing but a dull, gray weariness. Since the death of his father and Asa, it had taken every bit of strength he had just to make it from day to day. He'd learned to push his sorrow deep inside somewhere in order to get on with the hard work that was always waiting to be done on the farm.

When his mother's cheeks grew first flushed and red, then gray and gaunt, when she began to be taken by fits of coughing that left her clutching her chest in pain, Lucas gave up trying to keep the farm going. He spent his days by his mother's bedside, watching her waste away just as Lizy, and Pa, and Asa had done. He coaxed her to take spoonfuls of tea and wheat porridge. Holding her thin shoulders as her body was racked with coughing, he thought helplessly that it was as if something--or someone--were draining the very life from her.

Desperately, he tried the only remedy he knew, filling a pipe with dried cow dung and begging his mother to smoke it. The coughing only grew worse.

One day, a neighbor by the name of Oliver Rood rode out to the farm and offered to take care of the animals. "I hear your mother's real bad sick, Lucas. I'll take the creatures off your hands for the present, and come back in a few days to see how you're getting on."

"I'd be grateful to you, sir," said Lucas.

Finally, the time came when he could no longer pre tend that his mother would live. There was nothing to do but stay by her until death came. When she was gone, he felt something rise in his throat, a mixture of terror and anger and grief so strong that he was afraid to give voice to it.

Summoning all the strength of his will, he pushed the feeling down and down . . . until he'd felt the way he did now, his insides as numb and cold as the rough red hands that grasped the shovel.

Quickly, he finished the job. Then, opening his mother's Bible, he tried to read, but the words sounded stiff and hollow and held no comfort. He closed the book. There were people who had told him to adapt the deaths in his family as "God's will." But, hard as Lucas tried, he couldn't understand why God would want such things to happen.

Other folks had told him disease was the work of the devil. Still others believed it was witches who caused illness. He shook his head, baffled by it all. People got sick. They died. That he knew.

There were no friends or family to join him in mourning. The closest neighbors, the Hapgoods, had sold their farm and gone west, where the land was supposed to be cheap and plentiful. Lucas hadn't carried word to the Roods, or to any others. Their farms were far away. They had their own work and their own problems.

Lucas was alone.

Copyright ) 1996 by Cynthia C. DeFelice

Table of Contents

Forewordxi
1A Great Surprise1
2Cedric's Friends16
3Leaving Home52
4In England61
5At the Castle78
6The Earl and his Grandson108
7At Church141
8Learning to Ride152
9The Poor Cottages166
10The Earl Alarmed176
11Anxiety in America204
12The Rival Claimants221
13Dick to the Rescue235
14The Exposure244
15His Eighth Birthday251

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Little Lord Fauntleroy 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 40 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Pay for a better version. This one has too many errors.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book as a child, and it is still one of my favorites. A rags-to-riches story written in the wonderful literary style of Frances Hodgson Burnett.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loved reading this book.The plot was easy to get into.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The boy inherits a title and does well for those all around him. An inspirational story that deserves to be read and for people who deserve to be enlightened.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have long been a fan of "A Little Princess" and so decided to give Lord Fauntleroy a try. What a great book! A fun read for adults and children alike! I only gave it four stars because I thought the characters were somewhat two-dimensional, especially compared to those from A Little Princess. But still definitely a book worth reading!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Little Lord Fauntleroy is a charming book that teaches great moral and character values that often are lost in today's self-seeking, self-centered American society. I believe this book should be introduced in grade school or be read to young children by loving parents.
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