Little Pink House: A True Story of Defiance and Courage

Little Pink House: A True Story of Defiance and Courage

by Jeff Benedict
3.8 26

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Little Pink House 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 27 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This story is so unbelievable that if it had been fiction, I would have put it down thinking it implausible. A well written, incredible story.
Sharon Doerr More than 1 year ago
Jeff Benedict is truly a gifted writer! He has taken an issue that could have been a very dry read and turned it into an exciting story that, while unfortunately true, reads like a novel! I couldn't put it down! I want to read more by this author.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Little Pink House displays the sad state of greed and power in the United States. It clearly esablishes the lengths that people, cities, and corporations will go to when desiring more money/tax dollars. And to think Pfizer gets involved because of a little pill we all know as Viagra. The residents of Fort Trumbell stand strong despite the threats and money waved before them. Eminent Domain at its very worst.
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Rahbin08 More than 1 year ago
I learned so much about the eminent domain laws fo this country! I can't believe this could happen in America.
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AngeLawAD More than 1 year ago
This was a good read of a very controversial Supreme Court Decision. The Kelo case brought about change in Eminent Domain legislation in over 43 States.
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RdrWrtr More than 1 year ago
This is a real story about real people. You get to know them and you care about what happens to them. This is one of those books that makes you aware of the dangers of government without oversight, the power plays that take place in communities when one person gets too much control, and how one person can really, really make a difference by standing up for what they believe in. The Little Pink House is well-researched and written in language we can all understand. Susette Kelo and her neighbors fought the good fight, all the way to the Supreme Court. They should have won. Our book club read this and had a lively discussion about eminent domain and the rights of every citizen. We learned a lot.
Twink More than 1 year ago
Susette Kelo decides to leave her second marriage - her five sons are grown, she has had to struggle much of her life and she just wants to have a little house overlooking the water that belongs to her. She finds an older home in the working class Fort Trumble neighbourhood of New London, Connecticut. It needs some work, but the view of the water is priceless. She fixes it up slowly while studying for her nursing degree.

At the same time pharmaceutical giant Pfizer, just across the river, is looking to expand it's facilities by building a new research and clinical centre. In an effort to woo them, the city of New London, in the form of the New London Development Corporation (NLDC) offers Pfizer, free of charge, a four million dollar piece of property. Pfizer is also interested in having suitable housing, shopping and recreational facilities nearby.

And here's where two worlds collide. The NLDC decides that ninety acres, including Susette's neighbourhood, is better suited to Pfizer's needs than that of the people living there. Pfizer will generate jobs and more taxes. The NLDC invokes eminent domain and decides to take the houses.

Eminent Domain is defined as the power of the federal or state government to take private property for a public purpose, even if the property owner objects. The Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution allows the government to take private property if the taking is for a public use and the owner is "justly compensated" (usually, paid fair market value) for his or her loss. A public use is virtually anything that is sanctioned by a federal or state legislative body, but such uses may include roads, parks, reservoirs, schools, hospitals or other public buildings.

Little Pink House is the story of Susette Kelo and her refusal to let her house be taken. In a fight that went to the Supreme Court, the Kelo case is a landmark.

Investigative journalist Jeff Benedict has done extensive interviewing, providing coverage of not just Susette's view, but that of the opposing side.

The reader, Maggi-Meg Reed, does an excellent job. She captures Susette's defiance, courage and determination perfectly. Her voice also manages to capture the arrogance of the NLDC and those involved with it.

I was so captured by this true story. I listened in the car on the way to and from work and had to frequently flip back to the radio as I was so incensed by the arrogance, indifference and downright cruelty shown to the people of the Fort Trumble neighbourhood. Susette, her friends, supporters and their story are such an inspiration, choosing to stand up for their beliefs in a long, protracted ten year battle.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago