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Little Women
     

Little Women

4.2 231
by Louisa May Alcott
 

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"Little Women is a novel by American author Louisa May Alcott (1832–1888). The book was written and set in the Alcott family home, Orchard House, in Concord, Massachusetts. It was published in two volumes in 1868 and 1869. The novel follows the lives of four sisters – Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy March – and is loosely based on the author's childhood

Overview

"Little Women is a novel by American author Louisa May Alcott (1832–1888). The book was written and set in the Alcott family home, Orchard House, in Concord, Massachusetts. It was published in two volumes in 1868 and 1869. The novel follows the lives of four sisters – Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy March – and is loosely based on the author's childhood experiences with her three sisters. The first volume Little Women was an immediate commercial and critical success, prompting the composition of the book's second volume titled Good Wives, which was successful as well. The publication of the book as a single volume first occurred in 1880 and was titled Little Women. Alcott followed Little Women with two sequels, also featuring the March sisters, Little Men (1871) and Jo's Boys (1886)." -- Wikipedia

Product Details

BN ID:
2940013228566
Publisher:
VolumesOfValue
Publication date:
11/01/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
589 KB
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

"LOUISA MAY ALCOTT (1832 – 1888) was an American novelist. She is best known for the novel Little Women and its sequels Little Men and Jo's Boys. Little Women was set in the Alcott family home, Orchard House in Concord, Massachusetts.

Poverty made it necessary for Alcott to go to work at an early age as an occasional teacher, seamstress, governess, domestic helper, and writer.

As an adult, Alcott was an abolitionist and a feminist. In 1847, the family housed a fugitive slave for one week. In 1848, Alcott read and admired the "Declaration of Sentiments" published by the Seneca Falls Convention on women's rights.

Her first book was Flower Fables (1849), a selection of tales originally written for Ellen Emerson, daughter of Ralph Waldo Emerson. In 1860, Alcott began writing for the Atlantic Monthly. When the American Civil War broke out, she served as a nurse in the Union Hospital at Georgetown, D.C., for six weeks in 1862-1863. Her letters home – revised and published in the Commonwealth and collected as Hospital Sketches (1863, republished with additions in 1869) – brought her first critical recognition for her observations and humor. Her novel Moods (1864), based on her own experience, was also promising.

Alcott's literary success arrived with the publication by the Roberts Brothers of the first part of Little Women: or Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy, (1868) a semi-autobiographical account of her childhood with her sisters in Concord, Massachusetts. Part two, or Part Second, also known as Good Wives, (1869) followed the March sisters into adulthood and their respective marriages. Little Men (1871) detailed Jo's life at the Plumfield School that she founded with her husband Professor Bhaer at the conclusion of Part Two of Little Women. Jo's Boys (1886) completed the "March Family Saga"

She also wrote passionate, fiery novels and sensational stories under the nom de plume A. M. Barnard. Among these are A Long Fatal Love Chase and Pauline's Passion and Punishment. Her protagonists for these tales are willful and relentless in their pursuit of their own aims, which often include revenge on those who have humiliated or thwarted them. Written in a style that was wildly popular at the time, these works achieved immediate commercial success." -- Wikipedia

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Little Women 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 231 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good, classic novel. Never had to read it in school so decided to read it as an adult. Was pleasantly surprised. A little slow at some points but glad I read it since it is considered a classic.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loved reading this book. Saw the movie years ago. Books are always better as you can get so caught up in the stories!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
So romantic wonderfullly written
Guest More than 1 year ago
Being poor doesn¿t make one any less; In ¿Little Women,¿ by Louisa May Alcott, a family rises above poverty to find joy in the riches of everyday life. The book is about a family that deals with the everyday struggles of money. They lack the social status that they once had when their father owned a school. Now these four girls and their mother try to look past all the hardships in their lives and find the happiness left within. The family consists of four girls and an supportive mother who are determined to make the best of each of their lives given the circumstances she has been dealt. Their father is away working as a Chaplain during the Civil War, so the mother is left empty-handed to support the four children. This story is based on following dreams, whether it be falling in love or discovering happiness in some other sort of passion. The primary conflict of the novel is the March family¿s struggles with money in an area where their neighbors seem to be more well-off. The girls find themselves trying to rise above the talk that goes on about them by focusing more on their inner beauty. They are teenage girls, and they are trying to overlook hardships that seem impossible, and each girl will learn that money does not buy everything. Amy says, ¿I don¿t think that it is fair for some girls to have plenty of pretty things and other girls nothing at all¿, showing their state but she is too young to know that happiness comes from the heart. Beth corrects her childish theory by stating, ¿We¿ve got a father and a mother and each other¿ to display that the prettiest thing is love, which they each hold for one another.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was my favorite book as a young girl. Now that I have daughters I read it again to see if I still loved it in light of some of the current literature my 5th grader is reading. I still love it and can't wait for my daughter to read it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is a must read. Ages 10 and up shoukd look into this book. This is a spoil-free page, and guys, no one dies. So, just read this GREAT American classic. p.s. don't let 643 pages scare you. It is soooooo worth it. : { )
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I found out who died too. Im so angry at that guy/girl!!!!!!!!! Actually, im angry that they told you, I didnt read that review; i watched the movie. SPOILED!>:(
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wow i hate that guy or whoever did a spoiler alert ssssssssooooooo angry im on page thirty and i found out who died nice going:(
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I had a hard time loading and turning the pages.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was hard for me whe I was 9, but now that I am 11, this book is easy to understand. This book is a grat read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love Little Women! (But I'm on page 375) I think I will give it 5 stars! I think people might like it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I LOVE LOVE LOVE this awesome classic! My question now is.... HOW DO PEOPLE HATE THIS BOOK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :) :) :) :) :)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
An amazing book! I fell for Amy, she seemed like me. I'm 11 but I recomend this book to any age! This book has true liteateur or however you spell it. Mrs. Laura gives you such detail, you feel you're there! This book isn't like the crap you see now, so I'd read if I was you ;D
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hey, you guys are completley ruining the book for those poor soul who have not rea this amazing novel! And whats with all the dying? Yeah, we know it happens but what about the awesome parts like when Jo chops off her hair then publishes her writings? I find that very insporational.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago