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Little Women: A Coloring Book
     

Little Women: A Coloring Book

by Louisa May Alcott, Barbara Steadman
 

One of the best-loved children's books of all time, Little Women introduced countless readers to the genial and endearing March girls. Now, in this engaging coloring book version of Louisa May Alcott's popular classic, 20 ready-to-color illustrations recapture the charm and spirit of the unforgettable March family.
Lifelike drawings of the story's most

Overview

One of the best-loved children's books of all time, Little Women introduced countless readers to the genial and endearing March girls. Now, in this engaging coloring book version of Louisa May Alcott's popular classic, 20 ready-to-color illustrations recapture the charm and spirit of the unforgettable March family.
Lifelike drawings of the story's most memorable scenes introduce you to literary-minded Jo, artistic Beth, and Meg, the oldest sister. You'll also meet Marmee, the girls' mother, Mr. March, Professor Bhaer (a tutor in love with Jo), and others. Share the heartwarming experience of this close-knit 19th-century New England family as the girls celebrate Christmas morning and listen to Marmee read the latest letter from their absent father; witness Amy's close encounter with disaster on the ice; attend Meg's lively summer wedding to Joseph Brooke; and much more.
Accompanied by a specially abridged version of the original text geared to young readers, this coloring book will delight anyone encountering the March girls for the first time, rekindle fond memories among those who met them years ago, and entertain colorists of all ages.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780486299433
Publisher:
Dover Publications
Publication date:
01/07/1998
Pages:
48
Sales rank:
299,016
Product dimensions:
8.23(w) x 11.01(h) x 0.25(d)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Read an Excerpt

Playing Pilgrims


"Christmas won't be Christmas without any presents,"grumbled Jo, lying on the rug.

"It's so dreadful to be poor!"sighed Meg, looking down at her old dress.

"I don't think it's fair for some girls to have lots of pretty things, and other girls nothing at all," added little Amy, with an injured sniff.

"We've got father and mother, and each other, anyhow,"said Beth, contentedly, from her corner.

The four young faces on which the firelight shone brightened at the cheerful words, but darkened again as Jo said sadly?

"We haven't got father, and shall not have him for a long time." She didn't say "perhaps never,"but each silently added it, thinking of father far away, where the fighting was.

Nobody spoke for a minute; then Meg said in an altered tone, "You know the reason mother proposed not having any presents this Christmas, was because it's going to be a hard winter for every one; and she thinks we ought not to spend money for pleasure, when our men are suffering so in the army. We can't do much, but we can make our little sacrifices, and ought to do it gladly. But I am afraid I don't;"and Megshook her head, as she thought regretfully of all the pretty things she wanted.

"But I don't think the little we should spend would do any good. We've each got a dollar, and the army wouldn't be much helped by our giving that. I agree not to expect anything from mother or you, but I do want to buy Undine and Sintram for myself; I've wanted it so long,'said Jo, who was a bookworm.

"I planned to spend mine in new music,"saidBeth, with a little sigh, which no one heard but the hearth-brush and kettle-holder.

"I shall get a nice box of Faber's drawing pencils; I really need them," said Amy, decidedly.

"Mother didn't say anything about our money, and she won't wish us to give up everything. Let's each buy what we want, and have a little fun; I'm sure we grub hard enough to earn it,"cried Jo, examining the heels of her
boots in a gentlemanly manner.

"I know I do, teaching those dreadful children nearly all day, when I'm longing to enjoy myself at home," began Meg, in the complaining tone again.

"You don't have half such a hard time as I do," said Jo. "How would you like to be shut up for hours with a nervous, fussy old lady, who keeps you trotting, is never satisfied, and worries you till you''e ready to fly out of the window or box her ears?"

"It's naughty to fret, but I do think washing dishes and keeping things tidy is the worst work in the world. It makes me cross; and my hands get so stiff, I can't practise good a bit." And Beth looked at her rough hands with a sigh that any one could hear that time.

"I don't believe any of you suffer as I do," cried Amy; "for you don't have to go to school with impertinent girls, who plague you if you don't know your lessons, and laugh at your dresses, and label your father if he isn't rich, and insult you when your nose isn't nice."

"If you mean libel I'd say so, and not talk about labels, as if pa was a pickle-bottle," advised Jo, laughing.


From the Audio Cassette (Unabridged) edition.

Meet the Author

Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888) was an American novelist and poet best known as the author of the novel Little Women and its sequels Little Men and Jo's Boys. Raised by her transcendentalist parents, she grew up among many of the well-known intellectuals of the day such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Henry David Thoreau. Little Women is loosely based on Alcott's childhood experiences with her three sisters.

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