Live at the Fillmore West February 1969

Live at the Fillmore West February 1969

by The Byrds
4.0 2

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Overview

Live at the Fillmore West February 1969

This previously unreleased, stand-alone live recording of the Byrds at the Fillmore West in 1969 is a testament to the band at the height of its musical prowess. The amalgam of Roger McGuinn, John York, Gene Parsons, and Clarence White -- with only McGuinn remaining from the original fivesome that launched the group in 1965 -- is so imbued with the dusty twang of Nashville that it isn't until McGuinn's Rickenbacker 12-string kicks in on the energetic power medley of "Turn! Turn! Turn!"/"Mr. Tambourine Man"/"Eight Miles High" that we realize, ah, hippies! Guitarist White's luminous and enterprising riffing infuse the band's flower-power California sound with bluegrass virtuosity on McGuinn's "King Apathy III," a Who-infused rocker that cuts to a country break, as well as on "So You Want to Be a Rock and Roll Star" and the Bob Dylan/Rick Danko composition "Wheels On Fire." The concert closes on a political note with a jangly version of Dylan's "Chimes of Freedom" and McGuinn's pognant "He Was a Friend of Mine," which appropriately captures that self-reflective American moment that followed the '68 assassinations of John Kennedy and Martin Luther King.

Product Details

Release Date: 03/01/2008
Label: Sbme Special Mkts.
UPC: 0886972484525
catalogNumber: 724845
Rank: 24989

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Live at the Fillmore West February 1969 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
glauver More than 1 year ago
This recording is more interesting than compelling. The highlight is listening to Clarence White's guitar playing. He and Roger McGuinn made a good team. The sound was OK for the time but below average today. This CD does show the range of these late era Byrds, from country to space rock to folk. At barely 50+ minutes it is a bit short and the Untitled CD has better sounding live tracks.