Living Downstream: An Ecologist's Personal Investigation of Cancer and the Environment

Living Downstream: An Ecologist's Personal Investigation of Cancer and the Environment

by Sandra Steingraber
3.4 7

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Living Downstream: An Ecologist Looks at Cancer and the Environment 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Susan Gray More than 1 year ago
A great book about how we are only hurting ourselves with the use of chemicals to improve systems that were not really broken to begin with.
Guest More than 1 year ago
After W.W.II Dad sprayed the orchard with DDT. He sprayed the cows in the dairy barn with gallon after gallon of Watkin's Fly Spray. Upon the instructions and the example provided by a major land grant university, famous for its agricultural expertise, Dad began to be a 'more productive farmer' who would help to 'feed the starving children of the world'. To do this, all he needed to do was to spray--the corn, the beans, the alfalfa. And to keep the weeds out, he would need to 'kill down' the weeds in the fence rows. So he sprayed brush killers on the fence rows, and it was beautiful, with no weeds, nor any other kind of green anywhere, just bare dirt. An enduring memory of my father is seeing him up to his elbows, bare handed, in two five-gallon pails of atrazine slurry, getting it ready to spray the field corn. This went on all through the 1960's. In 1969 came the first of four non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in our family of five. Mother was treated, and it was caught early and never came back. By 1971, my father was diagnosed the same. By 1981 he was dead. Then in 1993, within one month of each other, my brother, who was ten years younger than I, and I were both diagnosed with non-Hodgkins lymphoma. My brother died in fall 1997. I am living by constant care, both medically, and under my own research and application of what I have learned. This cluster was caused by careless, excessive, and ignorant use of phenoxy and other herbicides, goaded by our nearby university, for whom my father was and uninformed guinea pig, unaware of long-term dangers to health, as was our whole family. Our farm is dangerous and uninhabitable. The soil, once productive of itself, is dioxin laden, and ethically speaking such land should never be used for subdivisions, but elsewhere, it is the yards where children and pets play. How much convincing does the public and scientific community need? Dad was told the old canard that 'It is so safe for humans, you'd have to drink a hundred gallons of this to do anything bad...but this will kill every weed you want to get rid of.' Thank you, Sandra Steingraber, for answering the questions I didn't think I'd live to hear answers to. This ranks in importance to public citizenry alongside Carson's Silent Spring.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am still reading the book and am amazed at the relavations it contains. It shocks me to realize that our surroundings are so hazardous to our overall health.
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