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Living in the Labyrinth: A Personal Journey Through the Maze of Alzheimer's
     

Living in the Labyrinth: A Personal Journey Through the Maze of Alzheimer's

4.6 3
by Diana McGowin
 

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Living In The Labyrinth is the story of how one woman found the strength and the courage to cope with a devastating disease that has afflicted five million Americans. Far from being an exercise in self-pity or a standard autobiography, this is an unflinching and ultimately uplifting look at a debilitating illness from the inside out.

Overview

Living In The Labyrinth is the story of how one woman found the strength and the courage to cope with a devastating disease that has afflicted five million Americans. Far from being an exercise in self-pity or a standard autobiography, this is an unflinching and ultimately uplifting look at a debilitating illness from the inside out.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780307804648
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
08/24/2011
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
176
File size:
2 MB

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Living in the Labyrinth a Personal Journey through the Maze of Alzheimer's 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
SpryGuy More than 1 year ago
I found this book gripping.  It reads like a novel as Ms. McGowin tells her story of drifting into cognitive dysfunction and taking charge of her life.  She talks about herself and about others with profound insight and unvarnished honesty.  She talks about her despair and about her hope in a way that riveted my attention and left me misty-eyed.   However, I finished the book confused.  She apparently does have some serious cognitive dysfunction.  But on the second to the last page of the book, page 137 in my Nook version, the page titled "AFTERWORD," is she saying that she does NOT have Alzheimer's Disease?  What does she mean when she says  re-diagnosis has ruled out "the subject diagnosis" and "the subject disease" for her?  I can't find those two phrases anywhere else in the book.  What conclusion do you draw after reading that whole page?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is an excellent read for anyone especially someone who has been diagnosed with Dementia or Alzheimer. My father is 89 years old and has been diagnosed with Age Onset Dementia. This has helped me understand him as well as helping me be able to care for him. I read this book very quickly as it was hard to put down.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This amazing book is written by an Alzheimer's victim herself. Diana Friel McGowin began having symptoms of Alzheimer's Disease at age 45. She gives us an inside look at what it's like to have this disease, from the first symptoms noticed, through the ordeal of searching for a diagnosis, to the finality in the diagnosis itself and the daily losses that come. Diana has a wonderful attitude, finding comfort in her memories of simple things: the smell of the small town library of her childhood, the the taste of icicles on her tongue, the sight of the first daffodils of spring, lightning bugs, a train whistle, her grandmother's violin. What a wonderful way to view it all, as she says 'I can sometimes enjoy the sweet fragrance of night blooming jasmine when no one else can.' We, the children of Alzheimer's victims, hope that a cure can be found, but if it doesn't come in our time, we do have an example of radiant acceptance.