Lizard Music

Lizard Music

by Daniel Pinkwater

NOOK Book(eBook)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781590173961
Publisher: New York Review Books
Publication date: 01/25/2011
Series: New York Review Children's Collection Series
Sold by: Penguin Random House Publisher Services
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 160
Sales rank: 797,580
Lexile: 780L (what's this?)
File size: 567 KB
Age Range: 9 - 12 Years

About the Author

Daniel Pinkwater has written about one hundred books, many of them good. Lizard Music was almost the first one he wrote, and remains his personal favorite. It is entirely his own work, and the story that it was discovered as a manuscript inserted in a bale of banana leaves, probably to increase the weight, is merely legend, and without foundation in fact.

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Lizard Music 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
One of the most memorable books Ive ever read. Ill never forget it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I first read this book in the fifth grade and loved it.  Thirty-four years later I love it still!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love it so much:-)(-:
Xan-man More than 1 year ago
A wonderful read for any child, even a child at heart. Parts of this story have stayed in my mind for years, a truly enjoyable read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book captured the magic of my youth, and I still go back and reread it. One of my most highly recommended books for kids.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I haven't read this book in years. My teacher read it to my class in 3rd grade. I remember racing in from recess every day to hear more of the story. I recently purchased it online to read to my children. Since it has been so long, I am sure I will enjoy it all over again!!
shoebacca on LibraryThing 24 days ago
I held off reading Daniel Pinkwater for a long time. I thought the books would be gimmicky and too goofy. At least when it came to this one, I was wrong. When I finally read Lizard Music (as a bedtime story to my stepson) I was blown away by how funny the writing was AND how much the book made me think. The story is told in first person ("I went down the street..." not "Joey went down the street...") and is about Victor, a boy who starts to believe that the earth is being invaded by aliens. The way the story progresses is not at all the usual "space-ships descended fromthe night sky" way. Victor starts to notice strange coincidences, and the way they start to creep into the story is eerie and disturbing. But the book stays funny and not (too) creepy, both because Victor is telling the story (so obviously he survives), and because he is a confident character (he is staying at home while his parents are on vacation). Along the way Victor meets some other engaging characters including the Chicken Man, a number of (you guessed) Lizards, and a turtle who saves his life. To tell more would give too much away. Suffice to say, this book is worth reading as a kid AND re-reading as an adult.
billmcn on LibraryThing 5 months ago
I loved this as a kid too. Not quite science fiction, just odd. The only thing that might make it difficult for subsequent generations to relate to is the protagonist's love of Walter Cronkite. When I was a kid, that was a quirky contemporary detail, but for anyone under thirty it probably provokes the response, "Walter Who?"
FionaCat on LibraryThing 5 months ago
This was one of my favorite books as a kid. I loved the wacky humor and the somewhat sci-fi plot. When the main character is left home alone while his parents are on vacation, he stays up late watching old movies. One night he discovers that after the station goes off the air, a new broadcast comes on -- a band of lizards playing musical instruments. This leads him on a hilarious adventure to discover the meaning of the lizard music.
Ysabeau on LibraryThing 5 months ago
First his parents go on vacation, then his sister, who is supposed to be in charge, goes camping. Now Victor's home alone--and loving every minute of his holiday. Pizza every meal, cookie dough, stay up all night long watching tv--but who are these lizards that have suddenly appeared on the television? They aren't in the TV Guide, and they seem to be planning something nefarious. Can Victor and his new-found ally, the Chicken Man, save the World?
glitterina on LibraryThing 5 months ago
Seemingly bizarre, but filled with meaning... reject the pod people. Be a lizard, now more that ever.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A wide deep hole near the top of the tree filled with a thick layer of solf dirt ( same in all the other holes in the tree )to dig nest in.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hxwdydh #*#622$