Logistics

Logistics

by Joelle Morana

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781786303103
Publisher: Wiley
Publication date: 09/05/2018
Pages: 224
Product dimensions: 6.40(w) x 9.40(h) x 0.70(d)

About the Author

MORANA Joëlle, Université Lumière Lyon 2.

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Table of Contents

Introduction xiii

I.1. Sheet 1: The Logistics Function xiii

I.1.1. Definitions related to the supply chain xiv

I.1.2. Definitions related to Supply Chain Management xv

I.1.3. Definitions related to Sustainable Supply Chain Management xvi

I.2. Sheet 2: Supply Chain Flows xviii

I.2.1. Fundamental flows in the supply chain xviii

I.2.2. “Internal” flow policies in the supply chain xix

I.3. Sheet 3: The Main Models of the Global Supply Chain xxi

I.3.1. The Supply Chain Management structure according to Christopher (1992 onward) xxi

I.3.2. The World Class Logistics model xxii

I.3.3. The SCOR® Supply Chain Operations Reference Model (1996) xxiii

I.3.4. The model of the Global Supply Chain Forum Structure of [LAM 98] xxiv

I.3.5. The model by Mentzer et al. xxiv

I.4. Sheet 4: The Main Logistics Associations xxv

I.4.1. The main national and international associations of logistics professionals xxv

I.4.2. The main clusters of French competitiveness in logistics xxviii

I.4.3. The main French associations of teacher–researchers in logistics xxix

I.4.4. France’s leading transport and logistics research laboratories xxx

Chapter 1. Operators in Logistics 1

1.1. Sheet 5: Transport and Logistics Jobs 1

1.1.1. Families of jobs in transport and logistics 1

1.1.2. Key Transport and Logistics Functions according to ASLOG and Recruitment Firm, Michael Page 2

1.2. Sheet 6: The Supply Chain Manager 5

1.2.1. Tasks, activities and skills of the Supply Chain Manager 5

1.2.2. The Supply Chain Manager and his/her relationship with other company activities 5

1.3. Sheet 7: Logisticians and Interactions with Other Internal Departments of the Company 8

1.3.1. Daily relationships with other services 9

1.3.2. The “new” relationships: the ecology/environment service 11

1.4. Sheet 8: The Supplier–Customer Relationship 14

1.4.1. The supplier, the focal company and the customer according to Lambert et al. 14

1.4.2. The supplier – the industry – the distributor – the end customer: the supply chain quartet 15

1.4.3. Other operators in the supply chain 16

1.5. Sheet 9: Operators of Distribution 17

1.5.1. Principles of distribution in a supply chain 17

1.5.2. Distribution jobs 18

1.5.3. The case for wholesalers 18

1.6. Sheet 10: Logistics Service Providers 20

1.6.1. Logistics services: between subcontracting and outsourcing 21

1.6.2. Levels of expertise in logistics services 22

1.7. Sheet 11: Operators in the Transport of Goods for Third Parties 25

1.7.1. Modes of freight transport 25

1.7.2. Operators in freight transport for third parties 25

1.8. Sheet 12: Operators in Urban Logistics 28

1.8.1. The classification of Chanut et al. 28

1.8.2. Cerema classification 28

1.8.3. Urban courier operators 29

1.9. Sheet 13: Reverse Logistics Operators 29

1.9.1. Different categories of stakeholders in reverse logistics 31

1.9.2. The example of waste treatment operators 32

Chapter 2. Innovation in Logistics 35

2.1. Sheet 14: Different Types of Innovation 35

2.1.1. Social innovation versus technological innovation 35

2.1.2. Technological innovation versus non-technological innovation 36

2.2. Sheet 15: The Concept of Eco-innovation and Its Application in Logistics 39

2.2.1. The use of the prefix “eco” in industry 39

2.2.2. The “eco” and innovation relationship 40

2.2.3. The “eco” and logistics relationship 40

2.3. Sheet 16: Sustainable Logistics Innovation 42

2.3.1. The concept of sustainable innovation 42

2.3.2. Sustainable logistics innovation: examples of award-winning companies 44

Chapter 3. Warehouse Management 47

3.1. Sheet 17: Design of a Warehouse 47

3.1.1. The role of a warehouse 47

3.1.2. Design of a warehouse 48

3.2. Sheet 18: Layout of a Warehouse 49

3.2.1. Areas in a warehouse 50

3.2.2. Types of process or methods of preparation in the warehouse 53

3.2.3. Equipment in a warehouse 53

3.3. Sheet 19: Types of Stock 56

3.3.1. What is stock? 56

3.3.2. The nature of stock 57

3.3.3. The destination of stock 57

3.3.4. The stock and “its quantity” 57

3.3.5. Stock rotation 58

3.3.6. The support of goods: the pallet 59

3.4. Sheet 20: Inventory Procedures 60

3.4.1. Physical, permanent, intermittent and rotating inventory 60

3.4.2. The Pareto Principle and the A-B-C classification 61

3.4.3. Example of calculation of the A-B-C method 62

3.5. Sheet 21: The Supply Quantity 64

3.5.1. Types of supply 64

3.5.2. Calculation methods 65

3.6. Sheet 22: The Valuation of Stock 66

3.6.1. When to apply stock valuation methods? 66

3.6.2. Example of calculation using the Weighted Average Unit Cost method at the end of the period 67

3.6.3. Example of calculation using the Weighted Average Unit Cost method after each input 68

3.6.4. Example of calculation according to the First-In-First-Out method 69

Chapter 4. Upstream and Supply Logistics 71

4.1. Sheet 23: The Relationship Between the Purchasing and Logistics Department 71

4.1.1. The buyer’s tasks 71

4.1.2. The Bullwhip, “whiplash” or Forrester effect 73

4.2. Sheet 24: Tendering Process, Specifications and Logistics Service Contract 76

4.2.1. Tendering process and specifications 76

4.2.2. The logistics service contract 79

4.3. Sheet 25: The InCoTerms 80

4.3.1. Functions of the InCoTerms 80

4.3.2. The different InCoTerms 81

4.3.3. The Baltic Dry Index 83

4.3.4. Packing list 83

Chapter 5. Production Logistics 85

5.1. Sheet 26: Key Concepts of Production Logistics 85

5.1.1. Criteria in production 85

5.1.2. Workflows in production: push, pull and tight flows 86

5.1.3. Just-in-time (JIT) 87

5.2. Sheet 27: Lean Manufacturing Fundamentals 88

5.2.1. Industrial excellence 89

5.2.2. The notion of waste 90

5.2.3. Kaizen through continuous improvement 90

5.2.4. The Heijunka or the smoothing of production (see Sheet 32) 92

5.2.5. The just-in-time 92

5.2.6. The Jidoka 93

5.3. Sheet 28: Lean Manufacturing Tools 93

5.3.1. Value stream mapping 93

5.3.2. The operations diagram 94

5.3.3. The 5S approach 95

5.3.4. Delayed differentiation 95

5.3.5. The SMED method 95

5.3.6. The assembly line 95

5.3.7. Ergonomics of the workstation 96

5.3.8. The unitary production flow 96

5.3.9. The Poka-Yoke 97

5.3.10. The Kanban 97

5.3.11. The “small train” or Mizusumashi 97

5.3.12. Short interval animation 98

5.4. Sheet 29: Implementation of Workshops 98

5.4.1. Implementation methods 98

5.4.2. Main types of implementation 99

5.5. Sheet 30: Production Planning: the Business Plan 101

5.5.1. Levels of production planning 101

5.5.2. The business plan 101

5.6. Sheet 31: Production Planning: Sales and Operations Planning 104

5.6.1. The relationship between sales forecasts and production potential 104

5.6.2. Example of a sales and operations plan 106

5.7. Sheet 32: The Production Plan: the Master Production Schedule – Material Requirement Plan – Production Smoothing 108

5.7.1. The relationship between the sales and operations plan and the master production schedule 109

5.7.2. The architecture of a master production schedule 109

5.7.3. Determination of net requirements 110

5.7.4. Production smoothing 113

Chapter 6. Downstream or Distribution Logistics 115

6.1. Sheet 33: The Problem of Downstream or Distribution Logistics 115

6.1.1. The problem of downstream or distribution logistics 115

6.1.2. The efficient consumer response (ECR) approach 116

6.1.3. SSM, CPFR and MMS 117

6.1.4. The case of e-commerce 119

6.2. Sheet 34: The Warehouse/Platform Alternative in Distribution Circuit 121

6.2.1. The difference between channel, circuit and distribution network 121

6.2.2. Selection criteria for the location of a repository 122

6.2.3. The alternative between warehouses and/or platforms 123

6.2.4. The case of the urban distribution center (UDC) 124

6.3. Sheet 35: Urban Logistics or Last Mile Logistics 125

6.3.1. The problems of urban logistics 125

6.3.2. Operators in urban logistics 126

6.3.3. The division of urban logistics spaces 126

6.3.4. Means to limit the consequent and polluting transport of goods 127

6.3.5. Reverse logistics 128

Chapter 7. The “Companions” of Logistics 131

7.1. Sheet 36: Traceability 131

7.1.1. The challenges of traceability 131

7.1.2. Traceability functions: tracking and tracing 132

7.1.3. Types of traceability 132

7.1.4. The four levels of traceability tools 133

7.2. Sheet 37: Freight Transport 135

7.2.1. The problem with freight transport 136

7.2.2. Regulations in terms of international road haulage and cabotage 136

7.2.3. Types of road transport and loading 137

7.2.4. Types of road vehicles 138

7.2.5. Other types of freight transport 139

7.3. Sheet 38: Information and Communication Technologies, and Information Systems 141

7.3.1. The difference between a software package and a software 142

7.3.2. ICT families in logistics 142

7.3.3. Software packages and software in logistics 143

7.4. Sheet 39: Quality Implements and Logistics 146

7.4.1. Shewhart’s control chart 147

7.4.2. The Ishikawa diagram and the Causes and Effect Diagram with the Addition of Cards (CEDAC) of Fukuda 147

7.4.3. The Ademiecki–GANTT diagram and the PERT network 149

7.4.4. The Pareto diagram by Joseph Juran 149

7.4.5. Flow sheets 149

7.4.6. Histogram 150

7.4.7. The WWWWHHW and the five Why’s 150

7.4.8. The PDCA method or the Deming–Shewhart wheel 151

7.5. Sheet 40: Environmental Decrees and Directives 151

7.5.1. Ecotaxes 151

7.5.2. Environmental directives and decrees 152

7.6. Sheet 41: Measuring Performance in Logistics 154

7.6.1. The notion of quality and quantity indicators 154

7.6.2. Indicator themes 155

7.6.3. The dashboard 156

Conclusion 159

Bibliography 163

Index 183

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