Lolly Willowes (New York Review of Books Classics Series)

Lolly Willowes (New York Review of Books Classics Series)

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Overview

“[The book] I’ll be pressing into people’s hands forever is “Lolly Willowes,” the 1926 novel by Sylvia Townsend Warner. It tells the story of a woman who rejects the life that society has fixed for her in favor of freedom and the most unexpected of alliances. It completely blindsided me: Starting as a straightforward, albeit beautifully written family saga, it tips suddenly into extraordinary, lucid wildness.” - Helen Macdonald in The New York Times Book Review's “By the Book."

In Lolly Willowes, Sylvia Townsend Warner tells of an aging spinster's struggle to break way from her controlling family—a classic story that she treats with cool feminist intelligence, while adding a dimension of the supernatural and strange. Warner is one of the outstanding and indispensable mavericks of twentieth-century literature, a writer to set beside Djuna Barnes and Jane Bowles, with a subversive genius that anticipates the fantastic flights of such contemporaries as Angela Carter and Jeanette Winterson.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780940322165
Publisher: New York Review Books
Publication date: 09/28/1999
Series: NYRB Classics Series , #5
Pages: 222
Sales rank: 277,890
Product dimensions: 5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.60(d)

About the Author

Sylvia Townsend Warner (1893–1978) was a poet, short-story writer, and novelist, as well as an authority on early English music and a devoted member of the Communist Party. Her many books include Mr. Fortune’s Maggot and Lolly Willows (both published by NYRB Classics), The Corner that Held Them, andKingdoms of Elfin.

Alison Lurie is a former Professor of English at Cornell. Her most recent novel is Truth and Consequences.

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Lolly Willowes 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
mahallett on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
really enjoyed this. disappointing ending.
laytonwoman3rd on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Well, this was strange yet wonderful. Laura Willowes was set to be the quintessential "auntie" of English life; unmarried, unappealing to the opposite sex (and uninterested in it as well), living with her brother, adored by his children, useful to his wife. But niggling in the back of her mind was the notion that she wouldn't just carry on that way indefinitely, and one day she picked an odd little village with nothing to recommend it but its odd little name--Great Mop-- and announced that she was going to move there. Leaving her "Aunt Lolly" persona behind, Miss Willowes settles in to Great Mop and gradually begins to know the villagers. Although she doesn't seem to fit in here any more than she did in London society, she is at peace with her situation until one day she comes home to find an inexplicable kitten in her rooms. Here the wonder and the strangeness truly begin. The moment the kitten grabs and bites Miss Willowes hand, she realizes that she is a witch, and this kitten her familiar. Although she puts it that she has "made a compact with the devil" nothing about her story suggests a conscious decision to do that. (It isn't a spoiler to let you in on the fact that "the loving huntsman" of the subtitle is Satan, though not the horned satyr of so much popular culture. Rather he is a very ordinary looking gentleman who can disappear into his background, and who does not seem to move anyone to acts of sheer evil.) It just comes to her that now she is a witch. This passive acceptance of a fact so utterly outside the framework of this woman's prior existence struck a discord with me, and if I hadn't known it was coming (from reading blurbs on the cover and several reviews) I think I might have had one of those ¿WTH¿ moments and tossed the book aside. As it was, I kept reading, and I'm glad that I did, because Lolly's exploration of the world from her new perspective is really a joy. Her little conversation with Satan in the English countryside near the end of the book is just brilliant. Overall I was not as taken with this story as those who recommended it to me, but I give it 3 1/2 solid stars.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I used to live in a cave on a hill with my 3 sisters and their kits so I lived with 12 cats in all.