A Lonely Death (Inspector Ian Rutledge Series #13)

A Lonely Death (Inspector Ian Rutledge Series #13)

by Charles Todd
3.9 45

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Overview

A Lonely Death (Inspector Ian Rutledge Series #13) by Charles Todd

“Todd’s Ian Rutledge mysteries are among the most intelligent and affecting being written these days.”
Washington Post

Critics have called Charles Todd’s historical mystery series featuring shell-shocked World War One veteran Inspector Ian Rutledge “remarkable” (New York Times Book Review), “heart-breaking” (Chicago Tribune), “fresh and original” (South Florida Sun-Sentinel). In A Lonely Death, the haunted investigator is back in action, trying to solve the murders of three ex-soldiers in a small English village. A true master of evocative and atmospheric British crime fiction, Charles Todd reaches breathtaking new heights with A Lonely Death—a thrilling tale of the darkness in men’s souls that will have fans of Elizabeth George, Martha Grimes, and Anne Perry cheering.

 

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780062034687
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 01/04/2011
Series: Inspector Ian Rutledge Series , #13
Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 368
Sales rank: 32,221
File size: 1 MB

About the Author

Charles Todd is the New York Times bestselling author of the Inspector Ian Rutledge mysteries, the Bess Crawford mysteries, and two stand-alone novels. A mother-and-son writing team, they live on the East Coast.

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A Lonely Death (Inspector Ian Rutledge Series #13) 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 45 reviews.
BookAddictFL More than 1 year ago
This is the 13th book in the Ian Rutledge series, though you'd have no trouble picking this one up as a stand-alone. A British mystery, set just after WWI, the mother and son writing team called Charles Todd does a great job of transporting readers back in time. Inspector Rutledge is haunted by the war, as are most of the men we encounter. The women are left to deal with husbands who have returned much different than the men they'd married. As readers, we're constantly reminded of the lasting effects of war. This is a slow moving story, as I think most historical mysteries are. We're back in a time long before computers and DNA. Facts trickle in and Rutledge does his best to piece them together. The murder mystery kept me guessing and the characters kept me entertained throughout.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hi. Easy reading, fast action. Will read more of inspector Rutledge.
AuthorAshleyDawn More than 1 year ago
Soldiers are being murdered. World War I has not been over long, but it seems someone has a vendetta to settle. Scotland Yard Inspector Ian Rutledge is sent to investigate the murders in a small English village. Finding the connection between all three murdered men-other than being soldiers and murdered by a garrote-is a necessity to find to murderer, but it will take a lot of digging on Rutledge's part! Rutledge also has his personal problems to deal with through the whole book. A close, personal friend commits suicide. His love life requires more than he can handle. Hamish, the ghost of a fallen comrade that Rutledge had to put in front of a firing squad for disobeying orders, speaks to him and is both a help and a hindrance to him throughout. Rutledge has a lot of guilt and heavy heartedness over all of this. The long, cold case of Chief Inspector Cummins-now retired-that has haunted him for years was bequeathed to Rutledge along with a warning about his new Chief. This case, 'murder at Stonehenge', pulls at Rutledge and splits his focus. An intriguing addition to the Inspector Rutledge Series that will keep you trapped in its pages! You won't want to put this one down. Reviewed by Ashley Wintters for Suspense Magazine
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have enjoyed all of the books in the Ian Rutledge series, but this one was something special. The author writes beautifully of the time period (after WWI) and the main character's struggle to continue his life after the horrendous experiences of the most terrible of modern wars. This book has three stories to tell. The first is the major case Rutledge is assigned to - a serial killer in a small English village. A small secondary story is about a much earlier murder that his previous superior could never solve. The author does an excellent job in tying these stories together throughout the book. And the third, even smaller, story is about love and loyalty. Even if you have never read any books in this series don't miss this one.
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alexia561 More than 1 year ago
This isn't my usual genre, as I'm not a big fan of police drama, mysteries, or historical fiction. This story is about a Scotland Yard police inspector, trying to solve a murder mystery, shortly after WWI. Not my usual, but still an interesting, well written story that I'm glad I read. Inspector Ian Rutledge works for Scotland Yard, and seems to have a slight problem with authority. Despite being good at his job, I got the impression that he didn't indulge in office politics or 'play the game' in order to get ahead. Reminded me a little bit of John Rebus, but they inhabit different worlds. Because of the time period, this struck me as more of a gentle read. There were cars and phones, but the cars had to be hand cranked and there was only one phone in the entire village where the murders took place. Every reminder of the time period sort of took me by surprise, as I'm not used to stories set in the past. Every now and again I'd wonder why he didn't just call such-and-such on his cell. Well, duh! Makes me think I either need to pay better attention or read more historical fiction! This was a good, old-fashioned story where the crime had to be solved without all of the modern CSI advantages. I liked Inspector Rutledge, but the mystery didn't really grab me and I was more interested in the characters than finding out the whodunnit. Gave it a 3/5 as I liked it, but didn't love it. Think mystery lovers would enjoy this more than I did, and most of the reviews I've seen have given it 4/5 and 5/5 ratings.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago