A Long Shadow (Inspector Ian Rutledge Series #8)

A Long Shadow (Inspector Ian Rutledge Series #8)

by Charles Todd
4.2 23

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A Long Shadow: An Inspector Ian Rutledge Mystery 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
Onthefly More than 1 year ago
Excellent characters. Fun twists and turns.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is my first Charles Todd book, but will not be my last. From the first page you are transported into the years following the Great War. The authors have tapped into the authentic feel of the working class denizens of a small rural village who may know how to keep secrets. A young girl disappears - a policeman is attacked - are the 2 linked? Inspector Rutledge investigates, but he has his own dark secrets, and shadow.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Set in the year 1919. Scotland Yard detective Ian Rutledge spent four years fighting in the Great War. Now he is back to being a dedicated investigator. But it seems that someone has targeted Ian for a game of cat and mouse. Someone follows Ian, leaving brass machine gun cartridge casings, with interesting designs etched upon them, where he is sure to find them. Ian, knowing that his stalker seems to holding his leash, finds his resolve actually shaking. ....................... Ian's investigation of a constable's death makes him the outsider this time around. Locals want nothing to do with him, except for one young lady who claims to be a psychic. ........................... **** This is the eighth Inspector Ian Rutledge novel and probably the best yet, in my opinion. Only the prior novel, 'A Cold Treachery', can come close to claiming the spot as my favorite story within this series. A bit long winded at times, but very good reading. ****
harstan More than 1 year ago
In 1919, someone murders the Dudlington constable as he apparently was investigating something in the nearby forest. Still haunted by severe guilt feelings about Corporal Hamish who he ordered executed for insubordination during WW I Rutledge is mentally more unstable than ever on top of battle fatigue syndrome he also poorly copes with his recent investigation into a grisly mass murder (see A COLD TREACHERY). Still his police skills remains superb so he travels to the ends of world to investigate who shot an arrow into the constable¿s back. --- The locals resent the outsider, but Rutledge still learns that a young girl recently vanished. He wonders if the disappearance and the homicide could be linked and seeks the connection. As he continues to dig for clues a woman claiming to be a psychic insists she can help his troubled soul as she asserts she can speak with the dead. Though he has doubts about her skills Rutledge leans towards trying to plead for forgiveness from Hamish. At the same time that the spiritualist has knocked him somewhat off his sleuthing game, an adversary plays cat and mouse with Rutledge, purposely leaving clues that suggest the culprit could kill the inspector at any time. --- This is one of the best most haunting historical mystery series on the market today with the latest entry as powerful as the previous seven tales. Rutledge is an intriguing person struggling alone to deal with the haunting of his soul. The mystery is terrific and the insights into post WW I isolated northern England is insightful and vivid. However, as always it is the psychological look at a veteran unable to deal with what he did and saw during the war that makes Charles R. Todd's dark thriller a winner once again. --- Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
BookLoverCT More than 1 year ago
Since I discovered this author and started with the first in the Ian Rutledge series, I look forward to the next one. I love the insight of Hammish. After I finish this series, I will try his Bess Crawford stories. Hopefully, they will be equally enjoyable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This team of mother and son who live in the US certainly have a very good sense of the 1920's in Great Britain. I have read 1-8 and loved every one of them. Superb writing. You would never guess that it is a team effort.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have, frankly, had enough of Hamish. Rutledge's delusions seem to be getting worse;his silliness about Hamish's "physical"location is growing. Furthermore, the author cannot have it both ways. In several books now, she has had Hamish "look"at things with eyes and senses plainly not those of Rutledge. In one, Hamish comments on something he sees , and only then does Rutledge l "lift his eyes"to look at it. In another, Hamish makes a comment in a vein chatacterized by being "a countryman through and through." Well, plainly this is ridiculous. Hamish has no eyes or senses separate fro Rutledge's. I wish the author would be consistent. If this is a psychological construct, it must have those characteristics, not those of a spirit. And if it is a spirit ... well, that's another kind of book entirely, isn't it?
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Thanks