Longbourn

Longbourn

by Jo Baker
3.5 66

Paperback(Large Print)

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Overview

Longbourn by Jo Baker

Pride and Prejudice was only half the story •
 
If Elizabeth Bennet had the washing of her own petticoats, Sarah often thought, she’d most likely be a sight more careful with them.
 
In this irresistibly imagined belowstairs answer to Pride and Prejudice, the servants take center stage. Sarah, the orphaned housemaid, spends her days scrubbing the laundry, polishing the floors, and emptying the chamber pots for the Bennet household. But there is just as much romance, heartbreak, and intrigue downstairs at Longbourn as there is upstairs. When a mysterious new footman arrives, the orderly realm of the servants’ hall threatens to be completely, perhaps irrevocably, upended.

Jo Baker dares to take us beyond the drawing rooms of Jane Austen’s classic—into the often overlooked domain of the stern housekeeper and the starry-eyed kitchen maid, into the gritty daily particulars faced by the lower classes in Regency England during the Napoleonic Wars—and, in doing so, creates a vivid, fascinating, fully realized world that is wholly her own. 

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780804121149
Publisher: Diversified Publishing
Publication date: 10/08/2013
Edition description: Large Print
Pages: 560
Product dimensions: 6.30(w) x 9.20(h) x 1.18(d)

About the Author

Jo Baker was born in Lancashire, England, and educated at Oxford University and Queen’s University Belfast. She is the author of The Undertow and of three earlier novels published in the United Kingdom: Offcomer, The Mermaid’s Child, and The Telling. She lives in Lancaster.

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Longbourn 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 66 reviews.
clahain1 More than 1 year ago
I wasn't so sure about this one at first. Considering all the Austen sequels, prequels, and re-tellings that have appeared in the past couple of years alone, it's hard to stand out, to somehow make a classic like Pride & Prejudice new. Literary writers have it harder than those turning the book into a contemporary romance or a murder mystery, because the result has to be more than ephemeral entertainment, it has to actually mean something. At the same time, this is Jane Austen--get too heavy  and your audience will riot. Just ask writer/director Patricia Rozema, who tried to insert a bit of historical relevance into her 1999 feature film version of Mansfield Park, treating viewers to hints of Sir Betram's untoward relations with the female slaves on his Antigua plantation and Lady Bertram's addiction to the opiate laudanum. Austen lovers were not amused. Author Jo Baker manages to tread the fine line between literary merit and pure reading enjoyment. She does this by essentially turning Pride & Prejudice on its head. The Bennets, Darcys, and Binglys become minor characters in a drama centering on their normally invisible maids, housekeepers and footmen. In reality, we aren't getting a retelling of a classic at all but a largely original work. The plot centers around housemaid Sarah and James Smith, the natural (illegitimate) son of housekeeper Mrs. Hill and Mr. Bennet, master of an estate that will be entailed away from his heirs because none of the legitimate ones are male. It's this beautiful and tragic irony that provides the central thread of the novel. Baker does a great job recreating the daily grind of life in service during the regency period. Her descriptions of maids washing their mistresses' filthy menstrual rags and carrying  sloshing chamber pots down staircases and through endless twisting corridors on the way to the outdoor "necessary" house brings us right into that cold, aching, stinking world. Yet Baker works to present us with rounded human beings rather than stick figure examples of the evils of social inequality. There's plenty righteous indignation on the part of the servants for their employers' often frivolous demands on their time and energy, but also genuine care and concern flow both upstairs and down. Where Baker does go wrong is in the beginning of volume three of the book, when the action at Longbourn stops dead and we are treated to an exhausting flashback of James's experiences as a  gunner in Portugal and Spain. Three chapters of violence, hunger and sexual exploitation that lead us....where? We already know the footman has an unhappy past and is wary of being noticed by soldiers of the militia staying in Meryton. And, through two taut interactions with the noxious and conniving Wickham, we get enough detail to set up the coming plot turns. The flashback is gratuitous  and undercuts the novel at the very point when it should be the tightest and most dramatic. Luckily, Baker does get back to Longbourn and even takes us beyond the end of Pride & Prejudice, so we get to follow James, Sarah, Polly, and Mrs. Hill a little way into their futures. Here's where the book really succeeds. Baker's servant class characters are as fascinating to spend time with as Austen's elegant creations and, by the end, we're just as sorry to say goodbye to them.
MommaG More than 1 year ago
This is not just another P&P variation. This book stands apart from all of the sequals, prequals and variations. It is not another story of the Bennets and Darcys but a story of the average person and the not so romantic real life of everyday Regency England. The story of Sarah, James and Mr. and Mrs. Hill changes how we think of the "gentle" class of Bennets. Mrs. Hill who is always portrayed as Mrs. Bennet's crutch becomes a person with a past and a present and secrets that have a lasting affect on the members of the Bennet family. Elizabeth, while not a Caroline Bingley looking down her nose at the world, is unaware that others are not there to do her bidding. Elizabeth,as an extension of Darcy's arrogance and entitlement, is unable to understand why Sarah is unhappy with being separated from those she loves. The history and the lives of those that serve provide another look into this period and another view of some of our favorites. The characters of Sarah, the Hills and James are real. I fell for James and his kindness and pain and Sarah as she matured and realized that there was more for her life if she took control. I loved this book and will read it again and again. Jo Baker's characters are alive and moving. Excellant, excellant book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Jane Austen would be disappointed to have this book connected to her name or work in anyway. The plot was weak and the characters unappealing and at times downright immoral.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Jo Baker writes a story that goes right inline with "Pride and Preduice". If you are familiar with Austen's work you can picture what was happening throughout the entire Bennet household. Worth the time spent reading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great premise for all of the Pride and Prejudice lovers out there. Unfortunately, the characters are dull, the story line weak, and the book is flat.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book!! I now will read again "Pride and Prejudice" because of this novel. Wonderful characters and great information about servants in this time period. Wonderful love story. Such a great idea for a book - well written, familiar but also new, and totally grabs the reader. Loved this book!! Another great novel I loved on the Nook is "The Partisan" by William Jarvis. It is based on facts and has wonderful male and female characters and a horrible villian. Both novels deserve A+++++++++++
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A fan of Downton Abbey and P&P, I was excited about this book and Entertainmently Weekly made it sound perfect. It was slow, boring and I didn't like or care about the main character. Only interesting bit was the Housekeeper back story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Pride and Prejudice meets Upstairs, Downstairs. I am a big Jane Austen fan and typically re-read Pride and Prejudice once or twice a year. But I will probably never read it the same way again, now that I have read Longbourn. Jo Baker retells Austen's most loved story from the point of view of the Bennet family servants and with their lives at the center of the action. The result is a compelling novel and a serious commentary on social inequality in both Austen's time and our own.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Surpisingly well written and believable. Most Austen spin offs are not. Harsher reality of life downstairs than upstairs.
books4gail More than 1 year ago
Longbourn combines beautiful writing with a plot that did not hold my interest. Baker captures the "downstairs" tedium beautifully but failed to captivate me with the love triangle of the main characters. Of course, the comparison is Elizabeth/Darcy/Wickham--no one could win that contest. I agree with another reviewer that the book goes off the rails in volume three. The closer we stay to Sarah, the more interesting the plot is.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is a well written and an accurate portrayl of the servant class. However it was difficult to read. Not becuase the characters were unintresting or for lack of a plot. But because honestly the whole book was just sort of sad. The servants slave away taking thier misfortunes as they come and settle for the life they have. While I am sure thats accurate I cant say it was enjoyable to read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Often I don't care enough about the characters in a novel because they are not made real and the author loses me. Not so with this engrossing novel. The characters become real very quickly and stay real. I couldn't put the book down. I was transported back in time, and lived through their joys and miseries with them. Only praise for this wonderful imaginative and empathetic portrait of a past time that in its exploration of inequality is very much a depiction of the inequality that remains today.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really liked the beginning, the first two "books." I was even telling people about how awesome this book was. I've always loved pride and prejudice- movies, the book. I always get excited when I see a "spin off." But... The ending was way less than impressive. It was very rushed, not to mention I rushed because at the same time I wanted it to be over. Overall the over was pretty good just sorely disappointed with the end :(
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Beautifully written with intrigue and excitement.
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Jamaican More than 1 year ago
I absolutely love this book!! Her prose just sings and all the characters come to life. I read Pride and Prejudice for an English Literature class in high school but have totally forgotten it. This book was so good that I today bought Pride and Prejudice to read again on my Nook. Also bought The Undertow, by this same author..
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have already read this book twice because I enjoyed it so much. It reminds me of the wonderful experience of reading Jane Austen, only with "downstairs" characters. I love how Jo Baker weaves in the story of "Pride and Prejudice" with this story. I actually like these characters as much as I like the original Austen characters. I also felt that the story kept my interest and I wanted to know what would happen to each of the characters. Totally enjoyable read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loved
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
majibookshelf More than 1 year ago
Longbourn is set in the Pride and Prejudice world but it focuses on one particular servant at the Bennet's house, Sarah. The Bennet's house is actually called Longbourn.. because back in the day houses were also given names… Anyways, I was very excited to pick this up because I love Pride and Prejudice and for me any extra time in that world is worth my reading time. I have to say that Longbourn is very slow. It took me two weeks to read it because I didn't feel compelled or had the urge to actually read big chunks of it at a time. I liked Sarah.. she works hard and has had a tough life. I also liked the relationship between all the servants and how the head servant actually treats Sarah and Polly like her children. That was very sweet. However what I didn't enjoy about this book is the way the Bennet family as depicted. Mr.Bennet is this man who has taken advantage of someone and has no love towards his wife. Elizabeth is sometimes thought of as someone who couldn't care less about Sarah and her well being. I just.. I love those characters so much as reading about them having an ugly side didn't sit well with me. I have to say that this isn't really a love story. Yes there's a man and there's a mystery behind who he is, and there is a romance between him and Sarah too, however we spend so much time, almost towards the end of the book, going back in time to find out his mystery.. however I believe we spend too much time in the past to the point that I grew restless. Overall I do think the novel was interesting and a different take on the story Pride and Prjeudice, but the slow pacing as well as the barely there dialogue made me take much longer than I really should reading this book. This is a three star rating and I recommend it to fans of historical fiction, as long as you don't mind a slow pace.