Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow, and the Feeling Brain

Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow, and the Feeling Brain

by Antonio Damasio
4.7 6

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Overview

Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow, and the Feeling Brain by Antonio Damasio

In the seventeenth century, the philosopher Spinoza examined the role emotion played in human survival and culture. Yet hundreds of years and many significant scientific advances later, the neurobiological roots of joy and sorrow remain a mystery. Today, we spend countless resources doctoring our feelings with alcohol, prescription drugs, health clubs, therapy, vacation retreats, and other sorts of consumption; still, the inner workings of our minds-what feelings are, how they work, and what they mean-are largely an unexplored frontier.
With scientific expertise and literary facility, bestselling author and world famous neuroscientist Antonio Damasio concludes his groundbreaking trilogy in Looking for Spinoza, exploring the cerebral processes that keep us alive and make life worth living.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780547541716
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date: 12/01/2003
Sold by: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 368
Sales rank: 1,031,143
File size: 996 KB

About the Author

Antonio Damasio is the Van Allen Professor and head of the department of neurology at the University of Iowa Medical Center and is an adjunct professor at the Salk Institute in San Diego. Descartes' Error was nominated for the Los Angeles Times Book Award, and has been translated into twenty-three languages. He lives in Iowa City and Chicago.

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Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow, and the Feeling Brain 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is an exceptional book. The science is clearly well conducted and researched, and it is very well written. At times it reaches an almost passionate and poetic quality which works beautifully with the topic of human emotion and feeling. This provides relief and balance to the challenge presented by the intellectual demand of understanding the science.
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