Losing Tim: A Memoir

Losing Tim: A Memoir

by Janet Burroway

Paperback

$14.95

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780989235235
Publisher: Think Piece Publishing, LLC
Publication date: 04/07/2014
Pages: 160
Product dimensions: 5.20(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.60(d)

What People are Saying About This

Madeline Blais

“This book is both an elegy and a call to action by one of our finest writers, who addresses us from the deepest place imaginable in a voice that is loving, memorable and overflowing with generosity.” --Madeline Blais, Pulitzer Prize winner, author of The Heart is an Instrument: Portraits in Journalism

Bob Shacochis

“I cannot express my gratitude to Ms. Burroway for writing this soul-searching book, a comfort to no one yet a blessing for all.” --Bob Shacochis, National Book Award winner, author of The Woman Who Lost Her Soul

Marya Hornbacher

“This book brings a piercing clarity to what it means to lose, to grieve, to give everything, and to love.” --Marya Hornbacher, Pulitzer Prize nominee, author of Madness: A Bipolar Life

Madeleine Blais

“This book is both an elegy and a call to action by one of our finest writers, who addresses us from the deepest place imaginable in a voice that is loving, memorable and overflowing with generosity.” --Madeleine Blais, Pulitzer Prize winner, author of The Heart is an Instrument: Portraits in Journalism

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Losing Tim: A Memoir 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loved this book, a new hallmark in the understanding of grief. Kudos to Ms. Burroway for baring her soul and opening up on how she processed the death of her son, Tim, a military contractor in Iraq, to suicide. Brave and beautifully done.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This beautifully written book should be read by everyone. Against the backdrop of a mother's loss, it brings a piece of U.S. history alive!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
LOSING TIM, is one of those profound, transcendent works that that you hand to another person and say, you must read this. She writes about the most wrenching experience possible, a parent losing a child. In her case, her son Tim took his life after serving in tours in Iraq and Africa as a mine sweeper. With grace and an aching need to know what happened, Burroway explores her own life as a mother, teacher, writer (she's published 8 novels and a book on the craft of fiction writing that was a tremendous influence on many writers, including me). She asks the great and difficult questions: can we really know another person? Can we take responsibility for their decisions? What do we owe the dead? The living? What she finds is both surprising and deeply moving. I urge you to read Janet Burroway's beautifully written memoir. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago