Lost at Sea: The Jon Ronson Mysteries

Lost at Sea: The Jon Ronson Mysteries

by Jon Ronson
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Overview

Lost at Sea: The Jon Ronson Mysteries by Jon Ronson

The New York Times–bestselling author of The Psychopath Test, Jon Ronson writes about the dark, uncanny sides of humanity with clarity and humor. Lost at Sea reveals how deep our collective craziness lies, even in the most mundane circumstances.

Ronson investigates the strange things we’re willing to believe in, from lifelike robots programmed with our loved ones’ personalities to indigo children to hypersuccessful spiritual healers to the Insane Clown Posse’s juggalo fans. He looks at ordinary lives that take on extraordinary perspectives, for instance a pop singer whose life’s greatest passion is the coming alien invasion, and the scientist designated to greet those aliens when they arrive. Ronson throws himself into the stories—in a tour de force piece, he splits himself into multiple Ronsons (Happy, Paul, and Titch, among others) to get to the bottom of credit card companies’ predatory tactics and the murky, fabulously wealthy companies behind those tactics. Amateur nuclear physicists, assisted-suicide practitioners, the town of North Pole, Alaska’s Christmas-induced high school mass-murder plot: Ronson explores all these tales with a sense of higher purpose and universality, and suddenly, mid-read, they are stories not about the fringe of society or about people far removed from our own experience, but about all of us.

Incisive and hilarious, poignant and maddening, revealing and disturbing—Ronson writes about our modern world, the foibles of contemporary culture, and the chaos that lies at the edge of our daily lives.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781594631375
Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
Publication date: 10/30/2012
Pages: 416
Product dimensions: 6.12(w) x 8.40(h) x 1.32(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Jon Ronson’s books include the New York Times bestseller The Psychopath Test, and Them: Adventures with Extremists and The Men Who Stare at Goats—both international bestsellers. The Men Who Stare at Goats was adapted as a major motion picture, released in 2009 and starring George Clooney. Ronson lives in London and New York City.

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Lost at Sea: The Jon Ronson Mysteries 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
AnnetteOC More than 1 year ago
Not everyone gets to interview a robot, retrace James Bond’s steps in Goldfinger, and investigate a death on a Disney cruise. But we might get the impression that such things are ordinary in the glamorous life of Jon Ronson. The Guardian journalist known for The Men Who Stare at Goats, which later became a movie, has had some strange assignments over the years, leaving him with many stories to tell…some that will probably raise your eyebrows as they did mine. You see, Lost at Sea: The Jon Ronson Mysteries tackles some heavy and controversial topics – celebrity sex offenders, assisted suicides, religious cults, the SETI program. But oddly enough, Ronson still comes across as insightful and fresh, even when I’m not inclined to agree with his perspective. The author’s engaging mix of investigative and “gonzo” journalism makes for a great bedside read that might end up keeping you up longer than expected. I had to read it twice before finally settling down to review it. I also got a great deal of unexpected laughs out the book. And although there’s a bit of language – as would be expected these days – the author, I’m happy to say, isn’t the type who resorts to crude humor. His interviewees provide him with enough real material for the readers to laugh at. Although I enjoyed the book (and now take a peek at Ronson’s articles online now and then), I have to wonder: What was he trying to accomplish with Lost at Sea? It’s not his final book, but feels a bit like a memoir, a sort of “best of” collection of articles. When googling Ronson, I half expected to find him retired, but he’s still writing for The Guardian, interviewing some rather unusual characters, and planning his next big journalistic adventure as a passenger aboard a Virgin Galactic’s space ship. If Lost at Sea wasn’t some sort of farewell, it starts looking like an attempt to cash in on one’s popularity. I really hope not. I would hate to see Ronson’s great writing cheapened that way. Disclaimer: I received a complementary uncorrected proof copy of Lost at Sea: The Jon Ronson Mysteries from the Penguin Group. A favorable review was not required.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I first learned of Jon Ronson from his interview on The Daily Show with John Stewart. I'm glad, in retrospect, that I decided to read The Psychopath Test first, as that book introduced me to his unique brand of investigative journalism blended with humor and personal insights. Unlike The Psychopath Test, Lost at Sea is more a collection of somewhat unrelated stories (even thinking that they are all "mysteries" would be inaccurate) instead of a winding narrative that explores a set of similar themes. I kept reading Lost at Sea, hoping to figure out the tie that binds all the stories together, and eventually gave up and just accepting (and enjoying, mind you) his quirky storytelling. In an odd way, I began to envision Ronson as a journalist version of Ford Prefect (a character from Douglas Adams' well-known "Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" series who travels the Universe making entries for said "Guide"). This may be because Ronson is British and shares some of Adams' dry British humor. But in essence, these stories - ranging from a evangelical Anglican program crafted to win wealthy agnostics back into the fold, to poking through Stanley Kubrick's copious notes on movies both made and unmade - come accross as oddly humorous semi-autobiographical tales of Ronson's adventures in exploring quirky stories for his show on the BBC. All that being said, as long as you don't try (like I did) to find some sort of unifying theme to the book, it is an intriguing read. From re-creating one of James Bonds' journeys in a custom Aston Martin to Jesus Christians donating their kidneys to strangers, each chapter gives you the intimate feeling of being right alongside Ronson as he explores various life experiences he investigates.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love his books & this is one you'll appriciate if you're a fan.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Meandering,slow interviews with colorless facts.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was an author I had heard about and decided to try this book. It was a good read and I would recommend getting it for anyone who likes investigative satire and investigative journalism around "out of the box" topics.
DickK More than 1 year ago
Barely got thru the first two segments. Ugly!