The Lost City: Discovering The Forgotten Virtues Of Community In The Chicago Of The 1950s

The Lost City: Discovering The Forgotten Virtues Of Community In The Chicago Of The 1950s

by Alan Ehrenhalt

Hardcover

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Overview

The Lost City: Discovering The Forgotten Virtues Of Community In The Chicago Of The 1950s by Alan Ehrenhalt

In the spirit of Verlyn Klinkenborg's The Last Fine Time and Henry Louis Gates Jr.'s Colored People, this book reveals how Americans once balanced the demands of modern life with a feeling of community--and how we might do so again.

"If you have time to read only one book this year, make it The Lost City."
--Amitai EtzioniA
"The Lost City is truly a wonderful read, and I found I could hardly put it down."
--Robert D. Putnam, Harvard University
"A powerful and persuasive work, which, if heeded, could go a long way toward solving our social ills."
--Heather MacDonald,Wall Street Journal

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780465041923
Publisher: Basic Books
Publication date: 08/28/1995
Pages: 320
Product dimensions: 5.80(w) x 8.57(h) x 1.11(d)

What People are Saying About This

Robert D. Putnam

"The Lost City is truly a wonderful read, and I found I could hardly put it down."

Amitai Etzioni

"If you have time to read only one book this year, make it The Lost City."

Heather MacDonald

"A powerful and persuasive work, which, if heeded, could go a long way toward solving our social ills."

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Lost City: Discovering the Forgotten Virtues of Community in the Chicago of the 1950s 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As a college student who was born in 1973 this book gave me the opportunity to connect with my grandparents and have meaningful discussions with my parents (who were part of the 'peace' movement in the 60's). I bought copies of the book for both of them as well. Ehrenhalt has the uncanny ability to make poignant insights on the lost values of the 50's without getting preachy or overly nostalgic. The best parts were his references to how the 50's had a greater respect for authority and how we lost some dear and vital relationships because of the disappearance of Main Street.