The Lost Gate (Mither Mages Series #1)

The Lost Gate (Mither Mages Series #1)

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The Lost Gate (Mither Mages Series #1) 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 268 reviews.
Frisbeesage More than 1 year ago
Danny North is a young man, growing up as an outsider in a powerful and mysterious magical family. His family isolates themselves in the mountains of western Virginia, practicing magic and teaching it to their children, but Danny is scorned for his lack of magical talents. As he get older he becomes more aware of the secrets and tensions wrapped up in his birth and the old legends of Loki. Loki long ago closed all the gates between Earth and the gods, trapping Danny's family on Earth. Soon, Danny must leave his family in order to discover his own power and challenge the ancient, evil gatekeeper. This is the first book by Orson Scott Card that I have read, so I can't compare it to his others, but I will be reading more! The stories of Danny and Loki are expertly woven together, the characters are fascinating and widely varied, and there is a lot of fast-paced action with some thought provoking morality thrown in. I don't often dip my toes into the fantasy genre, but it made for a very nice change. I was thoroughly entertained by The Lost Gate and I look forward to reading the next book in this series. I listened to the audio version of Lost Gate, narrated by Emily Janice Card and Stefan Rudnicki. Having different readers to distinguish between the two different story threads was very helpful for keeping everything straight. Emily Janice Card reads with a fresh, young voice that makes a startling and interesting contrast to Stefan Rudnicki's deep, resonant voice.
Aurelia_Literary_Reviews More than 1 year ago
OSC's latest creation, The Lost Gate gives us a compelling, rich story with the start of his new series The Mithermages. A delightful mix of urban and traditional fantasy, coming of age tale and a delicious twisted history of the ancient mythic gods. In Card's spin, these gods were once in fact profoundly powerful beings from another planet, with super-cool propensities for magic running through their blood. Beings who are still around, just a little quieter with gene pools that by this time are a little mixed and watered down. Which means it's very possible that you or I or my next door neighbor could have some very cool alien god powers that someone in the family forgot to mention. Ok, probably not my next door neighbor, he's a little... well un-godlike, but you get the idea. But, I digress... because this book is really about Danny, a member of the North family. Most of us know them as the Norse gods: Thor, Odin, Loki, that lot. But, who knew those North's were so interesting? I mean, fascinating in a historical, anthropological, even dramatic sort of way, sure. But Card takes us inside this once mighty clan as really, only he could have imagined. Stripped of most of their power, shunned and despised by other Westilian families, the old gods have become desperate and dangerous. Hiding out, living like barefoot simpletons in the backwoods of Virginia, the North's are willing to kill their own children if they show any potential of possessing a forbidden magic: the magic of gatemagery, which Loki misused so many centuries ago. We follow young Danny North, a child seemingly born with no magic whatsoever, as he is exploring his place in the world. When he discovers that he is in fact a notorious Gate Mage, he must flee the wrath and fears of his blood-thirsty family and try to learn how to master a long forbidden and secret form of magic on his own to stand any chance survival. The glimpses we get into the mind of a teen boy, are once more, just brilliant. Card doesn't hold back, giving us the awkwardness, the sense of humour, the fear, the hope, the confusion of a child with hormones starting to rage, and a whole hell of a lot on his shoulders with wit, grace and (all-though I never was I pre-teen boy, so I can't quite confirm this) what I imagine to be pretty damn near perfect honesty. From page one, there is almost an instant kinship with the boy, that never really lets up. We watch him stumble and make mistakes with a power that literally no one on earth is qualified to help him understand, and we desperately want to see him succeed. There are times when all that stumbling a bit much, and I was ready to get back to the heart of the story, but I came to realize that it was necessary to show Danny's character and how much of a lost little boy he really is. I also have to add that there are a few scenes in this book that are a touch graphic. It's marketed as adult fiction, but I can see it going over well with a young adult audience. Although Danny starts out quite young, it's definitely not middle grade or even tween fare. {Review Copy Courtesy of Publisher}
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The ideas presented in this book are amazing, and I would love to see them developed further.  I really enjoyed when the main character, Danny, was helping the other kids at school with their problems.  How amazing it would be to be able to change a major challenge in another person's life without them even knowing it was you!  I actually enjoyed the mythological references, and it was neat to imagine being a "mage" of any kind. All that said, I despised the crudeness and unnecessary language and sexual references in this book.  What was even the point with the Lana character?  At the end of it all, she divorces Ced, and is heard from no more.  The entire purpose of the character was...  what?   Reviewers of the second book have said it gets even worse, so I will not bother.  The meaningful and amazing story lines that this author is capable of are simply not worth enduring the crudity and mental soft teen porn.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I became interested in reading more Card after reading Ender's Game so I tried this one. The beginning of the book is too disconnected for my taste - I almost thought I was reading two different stories. There is also what I believe to be a low part in the story involving the library bathroom (where were the editors?) and I was really tempted to stop reading the rest of the book. Having said all that I'm glad I stuck with it as story lines got better and came together nicely at the end.
The_Unvarnished_Truth More than 1 year ago
I think Orson Scott Card is like the George Lucas of authors. He's a fantastic "idea man" who can build wonderful worlds with compelling story lines... but he's incapable of writing believable human relationships. "The Lost Gate" features an Orson Scott Card staple -- a genius youngster with a gift for snappy banter. To Card's credit, he actually managed to have characters in this book with average, or below, intelligence as well, though they seem borderline cartoonish. I couldn't stand any one of Danny North's friends, and often found myself wondering why or how Danny was even friends with them in the first place. The easy answer is "they were friends because Card said they were in his text." But he never bothered to actually lay any groundwork in this regard. One moment they're strangers; the next they all say they care for each other and are carrying on like life-long chums. Much like Ender's Game and all related books, Card also manages to wiggle out from under having to portray a believable dynamic by creating an estranged relationship between Danny and his family. If you ever read Ender's Game, think back to Ender's relationship with his sister Valentine (supposedly the most important person in his life). Did their conversations ever give the vibe that they were particularly "close"? Nope. You could say that most of the times we saw them interact came after Ender was "damaged goods" and lost the ability to trust. That's fine -- except that seemingly sums up every single Card protagonist ever. The funny thing is though...despite all my griping, I did actually enjoy this book. I even went on to read the sequel, and am awaiting the final installment. The concept that drives the book (families of ancient gods still exist -- though in a weakened state -- and Danny holds the key for all these warring factions to regain their former power) is good enough to overcome Card's inability to make me feel anything of substance for his characters. Though perhaps that's because I knew to expect that going in...
Theadric More than 1 year ago
I have always heard how great Mr. Card's books are, so I figured I'd give this book a go. It started off promising and I found myself looking forward to getting more into the book. However, within a hundred pages I found myself rolling my eyes at the crass humor and hoping it would end. It went from gross bathroom humor to the main character stripping and literally parting his cheeks for security guards. Following this occurs an episode of a young - yet legal - woman who nearly molests the main character, whom is only 14 years old. It's shameful and surprising that an author of such renown caters to the ubiquitous smut crowd that exists now.
FantasyFanMC More than 1 year ago
Other posts have dealt with the plot, so I'll stick to style. Here I believe Card is writing at his best. His masterful characterization along with an ability to maintain tension and advance the plot is really excellent. There are actually two stories unfolding simultaneously, one on earth, and another on a different planet. Both are engaging and suspenseful. Although the plot is connected to ancient "Gods" and their descendants, Card makes this connection in a very beliveable way, one that does not require the reader to be familiar with any of the old gods and their legends. As usual, he allows the reader to get into the heads of interesting characters. Imagine what it would be like to be a descendant of ancient gods, with secrets and powers, how you would use or abuse those powers, how you would assess threats and opportunities, how you would value others and so on. Card delivers it all with a very easy to read prose and engaging pace. Can't wait for the next one!
Soti More than 1 year ago
If you are looking for something other than the same recycled fantasy, you have found it. Orson Scott Card introduces us to a universe ripe with characters, events, and magic that does not just follow in the footsteps of others. If you have read all about Ender you know Card can be trusted, if not, this is a great place to get to know one of the greatest storytellers of our time.
alexia561 More than 1 year ago
Orson Scott Card is a legend for a reason, as he's a master at his craft! The man is a freaking genius when it comes to creating new worlds and stories! I got sucked into this book from the very beginning, and it kept my interest until the very end. There are actually two stories in this book, one about Danny North and one about Wad, a mysterious boy/man on Westil. Danny is a Drekka, one without magic, so he is looked down upon by the rest of his clan. The North clan were once worshipped as gods by humans, as they were very powerful mages. Their power has waned over the centuries, ever since Loki closed all of the gates leading back to their homeland of Westil. Little does Danny know, but he is a gatemage, with the potential to reopen the lost gates and return his clan to power! Of course, why he would want to help those that made him so miserable as a child is anyones guess. Danny runs away when he is discovered spying on a family meeting, as gatemages are supposed to be put to death immediately. He is surprisingly resourceful for a formerly sheltered child. Wad is another story altogether. Really liked his "introduction" to Westil, as it was unique. He has no memory of his past, and is taken in by the night cook at King Prayard's castle and quickly settles in. Very little castle intrigue escapes his notice, as he quietly observes everything around him. We don't really know who or what Wad is, but I had a good idea about halfway through his story. Gave this one a 4/5 as both Danny and Wad's stories are very good, and they mesh nicely. Card is an incredibly talented writer, with an incredible imagination! This book has it all; interesting characters, good plot, nice pacing. If you're a fan of fantasy, mythology, or just good storytelling, then this book is for you!
Melhay More than 1 year ago
Danny North is a young mage of 11 years of age, yet he is considered a drekka because he has shown no signs of using or having magic. Danny is a mage in a commune of the North mage clan where all are related and have been imprisoned here on our Earth for the last thirteen and a half centuries as the gates to Westil where locked and closed by Loki. And it's a given by all the warring families if any have a Gatemage they are to put them to death (with the thanks to Loki's trickster ways and closing the gates), yet secretly all the families hope for one to open the Great Gate back to their home land. Danny, unknowingly for years has been creating gates, and gets found out by the Greek girl. Danny is now on the run for his life, and needs to learn what he can from a world that knows nothing of making gates. I fear this was one of those books where the hype raised my expectations a little to high. As I enjoyed reading the book, it wasn't as out there as I had thought it would be. Orson has created a society where the people are from another world and full of magic, yet the magic is failing them and they are not as strong as they where when they where considered gods years ago. They are in need of the Great Gate to strengthen them once again, and to return to their home land. Yet they are exiled here on Earth. This book is the journey of Danny North to learning about drekka's, or normal people with no magic. Yet, Danny finds his way to other orphans of magic and to a wonderful home of people who take care of him and teach him what they can. What we have here is a young boy turning into a young man, learning what he can of what he can do magically, what are the good and bad things to do with his powers. Then we have another character we follow through the story. This character has lived within a tree for years, maybe centuries. Finally he births from the tree as a young boy, with no true memories of the past. He shows up in a town where he is taken in by a kitchen lead cook who realizes he has great powers. This is the character I actually enjoyed following the most. The mystery behind Wad, and the magical abilities he has, and the double life he lives in this wondrous home of the Kind and Queen. I think I would like to read the next book in this series when it comes out as to the curiosity it left in me. I'm curious as to why this families where exiled here in our world, what Wad will do now with what has happened to him, and what Danny will learn next and how to handle all the screaming inside him now. Will the families come after Danny or will he be safe in the future? I am curious. This book is a Young Adult read, and I think young boys will enjoy this read. I would say the book seems to be geared for young adults from about thirteen and older.
colmin More than 1 year ago
Orson Scott Card does it again. He grabs yours attention and doesn't let go until the book is finished. As usual he leaves you eagerly awaiting the next installment.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A great, light read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love it so far
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Krept forward.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sorry I took so long! I was busy.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She pads in "Greetings"
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wakincade More than 1 year ago
After listening to the audiobook, I was incredibly happy to have discovered this new series. I always enjoyed Card's Ender's Game series, but this trip into a magical world made up of the remnants gods left behind was great. Fans of Rick Riordan's Percy Jackson series will find this to be another great escape from one heck of a story teller.
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