The Lost Throne

The Lost Throne

by Chris Kuzneski

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780425235393
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 07/06/2010
Series: Payne & Jones Series , #4
Pages: 560
Sales rank: 238,333
Product dimensions: 4.20(w) x 7.40(h) x 1.30(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Chris Kuzneski is the internationally bestselling author of The Secret Crown, The ProphecyThe Lost ThroneSword of GodSign of the Cross, and The Plantation. His thrillers have been published in more than 20 languages and are sold in more than 40 countries. He grew up in Pennsylvania and now lives on the Gulf Coast of Florida.

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Lost Throne 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 43 reviews.
HendyRPH More than 1 year ago
This was Chris Kuzneski's best book thus far. He writes very much like a mixture of Steve Berry, James Rollins, an earlier (and far-better Clive Cussler), and Dan Brown (Angels and Demons/DiVinci Code -- not Lost Symbol). The book has a series of actions that are occurring in various parts of Europe each related to finding a lost artifact. The story moves along very well, it has a good mixture of historical information, and the characters are three-dimensional and at times, humorous.
stargazergsd More than 1 year ago
This was the first book by Chris Kuzneski I have ever read. After reading this I have added Kuzneski to the list of my go to authors.. Could not put the book down. Thanks for the wonderful read.
DCRIL More than 1 year ago
This is probably one of the best books, I have read in a long time. From the first page to the last it is an excellent read. I loved the plot and the characters were wonderful. I did like that you didn't have to read all books, to understand the characters, you were able to read them out of order and not play catch up. So sit back, get comfortable and enjoy the ride.
ReadingwithMo More than 1 year ago
The Lost Throne brings us the third adventure of D.J. Jones and Jonathan Payne. This time they receive a call from a distressed woman in St. Petersburg, Russia. Her employer was just gunned down in front of her and she needs help. They set out immediately to rescue her. Once in Russia, they investigate the death of her employer only to find themselves on a treasure hunt. The trail leads them to Mt. Athos, Greece. They run into an old acquaintance, Nick Dial, who has been investigating the murders of a group of monks for Interpol. Their quests are intertwined and they are forced to work together. Can Jones and Payne discover one of the original seven wonders of the world? This book is a very fast thriller. The story is told via the action and words of the characters. Don't expect detailed descriptions or unnecessary prose. This story moves fast, but I had no problem visualizing everything that was going on. Chris Kuzneski is able to tell a vivid story without getting bogged down. I really enjoyed the story. Critics may be put off by the lack of explanation or detailed research included with the story. But, this isn't that kind of book. This book is about action and adventure in foreign lands. If you like fast paced thrillers, you will love this book.
CGraham9 More than 1 year ago
I have been a fan of Kuzneski since 'The Plantation'. The writing style flows very well and it is a quick read. Characters are easily identifyable and there is a drive to complete it. He takes you to the edge of the cliff and leaves you there. Fast plot...high action...worth a read!
SuseGordon on LibraryThing 2 days ago
Payne and Jones are retired "MANIACS", past members (and team leader) of an elite military group. After receiving a cryptic series of panicked phone calls they end-up traveling to St Petersburg in Russia to rescue a historian after her employer has been assasinated. In another part of Europe, Nick Dial of the Interpol, is investigating the murder of a Monastery of Greek Orthodox ministers. Clues lead them to suspect that the Spartan warriors still exist and leads them on a trail towards ancient treasures.An excellent thriller with historical twist, fast paced, enjoyable read - I am ready for the next book!
AspiringAmeliorant on LibraryThing 2 days ago
Fast-paced adventure to discover a secret hidden by monks of the Orthodox church. Several plotlines merge into one as the characters delve deeper into the mystery.
SonicQuack on LibraryThing 2 days ago
Once more Kuzneski creates a treasure hunt for ex-Marine types Payne and Jones. Back too, is Nick Dial from Interpol, and both parties weave their own strands through this lengthy journey. The actual content of Lost Throne could easily be condensed, and the sheer volume of redundant narrative creates a bloated action adventure through Europe. The research is evident, and expected, although at times a little shoe-horned in. The main villains of the piece are well thought out and interesting. However Lost Throne is not as good as the sum of its parts, it's to long and the characters are rather shallow and unlikeable. Overall, its an entertaining enough read, it just won't be one to remember.
mniday on LibraryThing 2 days ago
The Lost Throne brings us the third adventure of D.J. Jones and Jonathan Payne. This time they receive a call from a distressed woman in St. Petersburg, Russia. Her employer was just gunned down in front of her and she needs help. They set out immediately to rescue her. Once in Russia, they investigate the death of her employer only to find themselves on a treasure hunt.The trail leads them to Mt. Athos, Greece. They run into an old acquaintance, Nick Dial, who has been investigating the murders of a group of monks for Interpol. Their quests are intertwined and they are forced to work together. Can Jones and Payne discover one of the original seven wonders of the world?This book is a very fast thriller. The story is told via the action and words of the characters. Don't expect detailed descriptions or unnecessary prose. This story moves fast, but I had no problem visualizing everything that was going on. Chris Kuzneski is able to tell a vivid story without getting bogged down.I really enjoyed the story. Critics may be put off by the lack of explanation or detailed research included with the story. But, this isn't that kind of book. This book is about action and adventure in foreign lands. If you like fast paced thrillers, you will love this book.
sgtbigg on LibraryThing 2 days ago
Jonathan Payne and D.J. Jones are former members of a top secret American military unit. A request for help sends them to Russia to save Allison Taylor whose employer has been murdered. Payne, Jones, and Taylor then pick up her murdered boss¿ pursuit of an ancient treasure. Meanwhile, Nick Dial, Chief of the Interpol Homicide Division, is investigating the brutal murders of seven monks in Greece. No routine murders these, it is soon revealed they were committed by men dressed and armed as ancient Spartans. Payne, Jones, and Taylor follow the clues that eventually lead them to Greece, where Dial and his assistant Marcus Andropoulos follow their own clues in an attempt to solve the murders of the monks.I have been trying to find a book like The Da Vinci Code, except one that¿s good. I like the idea of searching for lost treasures but I haven¿t had much luck so far. I had high hopes for The Lost Throne even though I dislike the use of ¿top secret¿ military units and the idea of anyone form Interpol actually heading a murder investigation makes me laugh. I was also willing to overlook 21st Century Greeks, who had maintained ancient Spartan customs and traditions, so perhaps my high hopes were misplaced. Mystery writer James O. Born provided a blurb for the back cover which reads, in part, ¿Part Tom Clancy, part Dan Brown¿, considering my opinion of The Teeth of the Tiger and The Da Vinci Code maybe I should have known better. In spite of these concerns I enjoyed the book right up until Chapter 70, at which point I lost all hope and considered throwing the book across the room. I don¿t wish to give away what happened since some readers may enjoy the book and I don¿t wish to spoil it. It¿s enough to say that there was a most unbelievable coincidence.If you enjoyed The Teeth of the Tiger and The Da Vinci Code this is probably a book for you. If you didn¿t like them, look elsewhere and if you find a good thriller with a hunt for ancient treasure thrown in, let me know.I received a review copy of this book from G.P. Putnam's Sons.
VirginiaGill on LibraryThing 2 days ago
The Lost Throne was my first encounter with Chris Kuzneski and his characters. Began the book with high hopes as several authors I really enjoy had praised it and was quickly disappointed. When it comes to action/adventure/thrillers I want something that keeps me riveted to the book holding my breath and ready to bit the head off anyone who interupts me. Sadly this one was easy to put aside for periods long enough to read entire other books, in fact I read THREE other books between when I started this one and when I finished it.This one goes in my "never again" pile and will wind up on the shelf at the cancer centers library instead of my own.
Unkletom on LibraryThing 2 days ago
The Lost Throne follows two seperate story lines, one a rescue operation/treasure hunt beginning in St. Petersburg, Russia, and the other the investigation of the beheading of several monks in a montaintop monestery in Greece. Both eventually come together although it's hardly worth reading the 400 pages it takes to get there. Neither story line is particularly plausible or even interesting. In the first story two ex-special forces types sneak into Russia to 'rescue' an American woman who witnessed the murder of her employer. There was no explanation as to why she needed rescuing when she could simply have boarded a plane for home. The murder investigation part of the story is even more implausible but explaining why would be too much of a spoiler (not that there is too much to spoil). Another thing about this book that I found particularly irksome is that the author allows supposedly well trained military and law enforcement personnel refer to firearms as 'guns'. This may sound petty but if these guys are calling their weapons 'guns' they can't possibly be the professionals the author is trying to portray them as. If you are looking for an exciting testosterone-laden adventure there are plenty of good ones out there but this is not one of them.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Spartans, Interpol, Special forces--crafted into entertaining sorry!
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Great read, with action, history, mystery, excitement. It's a step back in ancient times and murder. Icould read this book again.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm going to read some more from this fine author... great yarn!
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