Loud in the House of Myself: Memoir of a Strange Girl

Loud in the House of Myself: Memoir of a Strange Girl

by Stacy Pershall
4.6 32

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Overview

Loud in the House of Myself: Memoir of a Strange Girl by Stacy Pershall

“An utterly unique journey down some of the mind’s more mysterious byways . . . ranges from the shocking to the simply lovely.”—Marya Hornbacher

Stacy Pershall grew up as an overly intelligent, depressed, deeply strange girl in Prairie Grove, Arkansas, population 1,000. From her days as a thirteen-year-old Jesus freak through her eventual diagnosis of bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder, this spirited memoir chronicles Pershall’s journey through hell and her struggle with the mental health care system.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780393080513
Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date: 01/31/2011
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 240
Sales rank: 148,227
File size: 1 MB

About the Author

Stacy Pershall is a belly dancer and artist living in New York City.

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Loud in the House of Myself 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 32 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm from Arkansas, and I saw Stacy Pershall read at the Arkansas Lit Fest, and she was charming, funny, sweet and talked about how honored she was to be there. She's also a huge advocate for mental health education, and for saving the lives of kids who feel ostracized in small towns. Her parents were in the audience, as were a group of her friends from Governor's School. She said how this was her favorite reading of her book tour because she got to come home. The book itself is very educational, and I found myself nodding my head as I read more than once. If you're a smart kid and you don't buy into the Baptist thing, it's hard to fit in here. She's right. She talks in the book about the therapist in Arkansas and her teachers who kept her alive during her teenage years. I personally came away from Loud in the House of Myself with much more compassion for and understanding of why girls fall prey to eating disorders and self-hatred. When the first word of a book's title is "loud," you have to expect that maybe it won't be the most meek and tactful thing. I'm an unoffended Southerner for whom truth is more important.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is an exceptionally written book about eye opening story about growing up with an undiagnosed mental illness and the struggle to find the proper treatment in young adulthood. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Excellent, eye opening story. Thank you for being so exposed and honest. Your story will help others believe in themselves. You are beautiful.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very well-written portrait of life with BPS and other disorders. The author, despite her perception of herself, is easy to identify with and quite likeable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
First book I've ever felt the need to review. By far one of the best books I've ever read. I tell everyone I meet to read it. Stacy Pershall is one of my new favourite authors. <3
RtBBlog More than 1 year ago
Review by Stephanie: We always saw those weird girls in high school -- the ones who never fit in, who always sat alone during lunch. The ones we never bothered to get to know. Stacy Pershall was one of those girls, but shockingly, she doesn't seem very different from me. Her memoir -- all of its crudeness, honesty, and heartfelt revelations -- announces to the world, the deepest secrets of a weird girl, and also acknowledges how the girl who never fit in is actually, truthfully, painfully, a little bit of every girl we see today. This memoir is achingly personal. It's not like reading a diary; it's more like reading a girl's thoughts as they happen. It holds no barriers and only tells the truth -- the ugliest truth. I connected so much with Stacy, both as a child, and as an adult. My own suffering never has gone as far as suicide attempts or bulimia, but a lot of the things Stacy ponders upon are things that have flitted through my head too many times to count. It also vindicates the millions of girls today who sink from the pressure of body image and societal acceptance. I'm not saying suicide and bulimia are healthy habits, but upon reading Stacy's real-life accounts, a part of me feels like it knows why girls would do such things. A memoir is a collection of memories, which separates it from an autobiography, and Stacy's makes me feel like I'm living her life. That's how real, how heartbreaking, her story is. I had trouble finishing it in the end because there is no definite conclusion, so it drags on a bit, but other than that, I really enjoyed this one. Stacy's narrative as an outcast breaks my heart, and her discovery and exoneration, which is being diagnosed with Borderline Personality disorder -- finally! An excuse for being weird -- makes it sing. If you want the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, pick up Loud in the House of Myself to revisit the injustices of childhood, as well as the insecurities of life in general, that one girl -- all girls -- have faced in their lifetimes. Quote: "For a while I really believed [my eating disorder] was just that: playing. I was toying with the idea of sickness, flirting with it, but because I was not yet what I would consider emaciated, I felt I could give it up at will and move on to something else. The old I-can-quit-anytime-I-want. But soon I was sort of playing but it was sort of real, and then it was entirely real and I realized it had never been a game at all. Playing with anorexia is like playing with heroin, fire, plutonium, or Scientology -- it's just a bad idea all around. Playing with anorexia is like cracking open mercury thermometers and drinking them just to see what happens. Anorexia, to use the vernacular, ain't playin'."
Missy_Whit More than 1 year ago
My headline says it all. I grabbed this book at random one day while in B&N. I felt so compelled to read it that I bought then and there because I didn't want to wait to get home and put it on my Nook. I finished it in 4 days. Loved loved loved it!
DrumNdancer More than 1 year ago
What a fascinating, unique memoir- so worth reading! Kudos, Stacy Pershall!!!
Anonymous 5 months ago
Knocked on the door.
Anonymous 5 months ago
Mom and dad walk in with JT. He is the 4th oldest. Behind Luna, Lennie, and Lori. When they walk in JT introduces himself and Lincoln and JT get to know each other a bit. Luan jokes around with JT while Lisa uses JT as a test subject.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fantastic account of her life so far. I couldn't put it down and when I had to, I found myself wondering what is she doing now. I truly lost myself in this book. Felt like I was right there with her.
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Highly recommended read
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