×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Love Children
     

The Love Children

2.3 3
by Marilyn French
 

See All Formats & Editions


"The Love Children is valuable in its exploration and depiction of the many ways in which gender can still be a limitation, even within a supposedly more enlightened society."—Bust Magazine

It is the late 1960s in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Grateful Dead is playing on the radio and teenagers are wearing long hair and blue jeans. Jess

Overview


"The Love Children is valuable in its exploration and depiction of the many ways in which gender can still be a limitation, even within a supposedly more enlightened society."—Bust Magazine

It is the late 1960s in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Grateful Dead is playing on the radio and teenagers are wearing long hair and blue jeans. Jess Leighton, the daughter of a temperamental painter and a proto-feminist Harvard professor, is struggling to make sense of her world amid racial tensions, Vietnam War protests, and anti-government rage.

With more options than her mother's generation, but no role model for creating the life she desires, Jess experiments with sex and psychedelic drugs as she searches for happiness on her own terms. In the midst of joining and fleeing a commune, growing organic vegetables, and operating a sustainable restaurant, Jess grapples with the legacy of her mother's generation

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"A novel that feels like memoir, there are many beautiful passages and poignant moments. . . " —Publishers Weekly

“French’s meticulous and affecting tale of the forging of one woman’s conscience encompasses thoughtful portraits of ‘love children,’ from peace activists to members of unconventional families, and a forthright critique of the counterculture that puts today’s wars, struggles for equality, and environmental troubles into sharp perspective.”
Booklist

"The Love Children is valuable in its exploration and depiction of the many ways in which gender can still be a limitation, even within a supposedly more enlightened society."—Bust

"Marilyn French has left us with the perfect parallel to The Women's Room, a novel about the 'love children' who were born to that earlier struggling generation, and who now celebrate the joy of feminism. Readers will find their own lives here—and the heart and mind of a woman who helped save them." —Gloria Steinem

"I fell completely into the university created in The Love Children—the Vietnam War and the lives of women and girls in the 60s and 70s. Marilyn French asks, with perfect attention to detail and scene, if we learn from our mistakes. Once again she gives us the ammunition to change our lives. It is a generous parting gift from one of the best minds of our time." —Carol Jenkins, founder of the Women's Media Center

"A fictionalized memoir that is perfect reading for the girls we once were, and for the new generation of girls we cherish today." —Stella Duffy, author of Theodora: Actress, Empress, Whore

"Beautifully written, kind and subtle, a nostalgic reminder of idealism, of people politics, of the links between the land and social changes - here, in fictional form, is the background to all the issues still we wrestle with. A lovely novel." —Kate Mosse, author of Labyrinth

Publishers Weekly
Marilyn French's The Women's Room, published in 1977, spoke to a generation. In this final novel, published posthumously, French uses the social unrest of the late 1960s as the seedbed for modern dissatisfaction. Jess Leighton navigates her parents' divorce, the Vietnam War, racism and her burgeoning sexuality with difficulty. She plunges into sex, drugs, bad relationships and life on a commune growing organic vegetables, something she had never imagined back in high school in Cambridge, Mass. A novel that feels like a memoir, there are many beautiful passages and poignant moments, but French tries to cover too much and tells more than she shows. When she pulls back the curtain on specific, life-changing moments in Jess's life, the writing is strong and the investment in the characters deep, which makes the weaker sections all the more frustrating. French's disciples will laud this as a life-affirming work; her critics will dismiss it; but it's too complex and nuanced a novel to be banished into either camp. (Sept.)
Library Journal
It's the late Sixties, and Jess Leighton is caught up in the racial tensions, antiwar protests, gender issues, and sexual freedom of the times. She is also dealing with family issues. Her father is a moody painter who abandons the family and heads to Vermont when he hits the big time, leaving Jess's mother, a professor, to find her own way and support herself and her daughter. Eventually, she divorces him—at a time when women were just discovering this new route to freedom from dead-end marriages. Jess grows up with many more options than her mother but has a hard time finding herself; she experiments with drugs and sex, joins a commune, and tries to operate a sustainable restaurant. VERDICT The recently deceased French, author of the classic feminist title The Women's Room, covers familiar ground in her final novel, and her characters do little to inspire. Readers interested in feminist fiction might do better to go back and read her 1977 novel.—Robin Nesbitt, Columbus Metropolitan Lib., OH

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781558616066
Publisher:
Feminist Press at CUNY, The
Publication date:
09/01/2009
Series:
Classic Feminist Writers Series
Pages:
352
Sales rank:
1,092,163
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.70(d)

Meet the Author

Pioneering feminist thinker Marilyn French has written numerous works of literary criticism, history, memoir, and fiction. Her bestselling classic, The Women's Room, embodied the issues that ignited the women's movement for millions of readers. Recently, she has published the novel In the Name of Friendship and a four volume series of women's history entitled From Eve to Dawn.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

The Love Children 2.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Many of the B&N members seem to dislike this book. I for one think it's brilliant. I've not yet finished, but i'm hooked.
Grizelda More than 1 year ago
I know this was written right before her death but I found this a disappointment. I loved The Woman's Room and The Bleeding Heart (no longer in print) but this was an indulgent book - a bore, don't waste your money...so sorry.