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Low-Fat Jewish Cookbook: 225 Traditional and Contemporary Gourmet Kosher Recipes for Holidays and Every Day
     

Low-Fat Jewish Cookbook: 225 Traditional and Contemporary Gourmet Kosher Recipes for Holidays and Every Day

by Faye Levy, Susan DeStaebler (Designed by)
 
When people think of Jewish cooking, "low fat" aren't usually the first words that come to mind. But now, thanks to The Low-Fat Jewish Cookbook, kosher food doesn't have to mean fattening food. Using simple combinations of accessible ingredients, renowned cookbook author Faye Levy creates delicious, healthful dishes that meet all of the guidelines for

Overview

When people think of Jewish cooking, "low fat" aren't usually the first words that come to mind. But now, thanks to The Low-Fat Jewish Cookbook, kosher food doesn't have to mean fattening food. Using simple combinations of accessible ingredients, renowned cookbook author Faye Levy creates delicious, healthful dishes that meet all of the guidelines for keeping kosher.

While many Jewish cooks don't keep a kosher kitchen throughout the entire year, they do want to prepare traditional Jewish dishes for the holidays. Following a comprehensive introduction outlining the rules of kashrut, the first part of the book is divided by holiday (including a section on Shabbat), beginning with a description of each special day and the foods that are associated with it. The recipes that follow include lightened-up versions of old favorites such as noodle kugel, blintzes, honey cake, challah, and even a gefilte fish that is made in the food processor, all low in fat and all true to their origins.

The second part of the book consists of fabulous low-fat everyday recipes organized into general chapters, including Appetizers and Salads, Dairy and Egg Dishes, Chicken and Turkey Dishes, Vegetables and Vegetarian Dishes, and Desserts. This book is for cooks who keep a kosher kitchen year round and any cook looking for exciting, fast (many under 30 minutes), and easy recipes with family appeal. Recipes include Broiled Eggplant Slices, Easy Chicken Breast Paella, Beef Stew with Cilantro, Garlic, and Tomatoes, Low-Fat Macaroni and Cheese, and Double Chocolate Ice Cream Cake, and each recipe is denoted as meat, dairy, or pareve for easy reference. Remember, any dish can be kosherso long as it adheres to the basic rules of kashrut, so Coq au Vin can be just as kosher as Cholent. And in recent years, as more and more cooks have been turning to kosher cuisine, there has been a proliferation of kosher products in the markets, making it easier to keep kosher and to cook "gourmet" dishes with a variety of ethnic influences.

Eight pages of full-color photographs bring a number of these dishes to life. And who better to bring kosher cooking into the nineties than Faye Levy, author of Faye Levy's International Jewish Cookbook and many other cookbooks. Faye Levy proves that a dish doesn't have to be complicated to be delicious, and it doesn't have to be high in fat to be flavorful. The Low-Fat Jewish Cookbook is a contemporary, straightforward companion that will allow kosher cooks to enjoy traditional and innovative meals without the guilt.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
No, the title is not an oxymoron, as this collection of kosher recipes proves. Levy (Faye Levy's International Chicken Cookbook) calculates nutritional information for each recipe and notes whether it is classified as dairy, meat or pareve (suitable for eating with either dairy or meat). Revisions include lighter versions of Ashkenazic favorites such as Turkey Tsimmes with Apricots and Red Wine and Potato Latke "Muffins" cleverly baked in muffin tins rather than fried. There are kosher versions of other ethnic foods, like Tandoori Chicken with Basmati Rice, which calls for marinating the chicken in lemon juice and oil rather than yogurt. Predominant, however, are recipes for interesting, simple dishes that will appeal to kosher and non-kosher diners alike, such as Cucumber Salad with Dried Cranberries and Yogurt or Cauliflower and Corn Souffle. The initial chapters cover specific holidays, while the latter half of the book is organized by course and/or main ingredient (e.g., Soups; The Fish Course). The shape of some of these latter chapters is somewhat haphazard: in the introduction to the pasta chapter, Levy reminisces about the noodle kugel of her youth, then fails to give any kugel recipes (they appear earlier); it is also confusing to have vegetarian dishes and vegetable side dishes (not all of which are vegetarian) grouped together. Organizational quibbles aside, this is a solid, varied kosher cookbook. (Mar.)
Library Journal
Levy is the author of more than a dozen cookbooks, including Faye Levy's International Jewish Cookbooks (LJ 11/15/91). The recipes in the first half of her low-fat cookbook are arranged by holiday and those in the second half by course, although many of these are suggested for specific holidays as well. A number of good cookbooks on Jewish cooking have appeared recently, including Claudia Roden's authoritative The Book of Jewish Food (LJ 12/96), but anyone who cooks kosher every day or just on certain holidays and is concerned about fat will be interested in Levy's latest.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780517703649
Publisher:
Random House Value Publishing, Incorporated
Publication date:
04/01/1997
Pages:
384
Product dimensions:
7.78(w) x 9.56(h) x 1.16(d)

Meet the Author

Faye Levy is a graduate of La Varenne Cooking School in Paris and a well-known food writer, journalist, and cooking teacher.  She has written for national food magazines such as Gourmet and Bon Appétit and is the award-winning author of fifteen cookbooks, including Faye Levy's International Vegetable Cookbook and Faye Levy's International Chicken Cookbook.

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