Lust

Lust

by Diana Raab

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Overview

Lust by Diana Raab

A passionate journey through private emotional moments, Diana Raab's LUST voices the pain of loneliness and the heart's yearning for love while transcending the depths of human desire. In her fourth book of poetry, Raab employs narrative verse that is alive, titillating, and seductive. LUST examines the emotional and physical complexity of love, helping readers navigate the risks of intimacy as we move toward the realization that every experience enriches our lives, whether we perceive it as joy, pain, or out of the ordinary. Yet for all their psychological richness, the poems's simplicity and accessibility will resonate with women and men across all walks of life. LUST is a book you won't put down and won't soon forget.

"Diana Raab's poetry collection, LUST, will make you fall head-over- heels in love with words. Words that are strung together, knotted like a perfect strand of opera length pearls. Some read like heartbreaking short stories. Some read like pieces of your soul. Some read like scented love-letters. Some like tearful, regretful voice messages. If you want to have a love affair with the written word, please, read this collection. It will make you a believer. Or maybe ... just maybe, it will make you a believer in the pure absolute beauty of Diana Raab."--Amy Ferris

"In the lyric tradition of Song of Songs, Rumi, Lady Murasaki, and Anais Nin, poet Diana Raab sings of carnal desire. The themes of LUST, the transcendence of sexual ecstasy, the range of its expression, the sorrow of its temporality, they surprise of its renewal in maturity, the physicality of its intimacy, are, at once, timeless and as contemporary as Raab's short leather skirt and an espresso shared at Starbucks."--Tristine Rainer

"Diana Raab in this daring book offers what shouldn't be so remarkable, yet is, a fearless detailing of intimacy, of blissful 'acts of kindness,' of that worshipful sexuality which forms our birth- and adult-right. LUST celebrates the sacred 'everlasting eros' that we must admit most interests us, the giving and taking, the ultimate bonding, the very enlightenment through glories of the body. She sings 'your oasis in the midst of me,' and bless her for it!"--Barry Spacks

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781625490582
Publisher: WordTech Communications
Publication date: 02/01/2014
Pages: 104
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.25(d)

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Lust 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Carl80 More than 1 year ago
Lust, from my American Heritage dictionary (1953) is defined as overpowering or overmastering desire. Lust is also defined as principally desire or love of an intense sexual nature. Elsewhere, love is defined as the intense and overpowering desire of a human for one of the opposite sex. I include these entries as a way into a consideration of this slender, intense, volume of narrative poems, focused, as the title suggests, on the physical elements of love and desire between the woman as writer and lover and the objects of her lust and desire, which in this case are certainly male. Still, one might make a case, at times, for a feminine target and would not violate the fabric of emotion woven by the writer in these poems. By turns, tender, firm and even raunchy, they provide a rollercoaster of insight into what might be a long and sometimes turbulent relationship between two lovers. And while we may be drawn again and again to the explosive physical side of the relationship, it is the flow of emotional highs and lows that hold together this narrative and in the end, offer up a sort of satisfaction and even bliss. We recognize the poet has seen and recognized the same emotions that most humans experience in the physicality of sex, that we, the readers have likewise experienced. We welcome the presence of a kindred spirit and one who, with the passage of time, speaks as we might. This is a lovely, thoughtful and joyously lustful collection of intimate times. Well-done.
bemiown More than 1 year ago
REVIEW This wonderful book of poetry is steamy at times. All of the poems are very well written with long and hard thoughts put in each one. Sometimes people shy away from Poetry, thinking that they won't understand it, they won't get what the author is trying to come across. In my opinion, Poetry is what the reader gets out of it. Perhaps the author meant one thing, but the reader may not see it that way. What's important to me is how I see the poem, what I get from the poem. I think a lot of people are scared of the poetry. Some people haven't been exposed to poetry so it is an unknown and we are leery of unknowns. The author wrote a variety of poems, some I would read once and later on, go back and re-read it.I myself liked this list of poems: LUST SPEAK YOUR PRESENCE WHAT WE HIDE MY MORPHINE CREATE COPING NO FEAR SPRAWLED I liked others but these hit me with special meaning for me.What I got from these selected poems, others may not care for, but to me they held meaning, a little heartache and a timely smile. You can read thee poems several times and they mean the same. Later in your life you could go back and read them again and they mean something different to you. Poetry holds beauty and power. It's like no other writing. It can tell a story in so few words. It can affect so many people in different ways. It's a piece of work that can be picked up and almost anyone can find something that strikes their heart and soul. I would recommend this book of poetry to everyone who loves poetry of any kind. It is a beautiful writing of life. I was given a complimentary copy of LUST from the author Diana Raab and Pump Up Your Book for my view of the book. No other compensation took place. SHARE THIS LOVELY BOOK OF POETRY OF LIFE.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
These are the kind of poems you read cover-to-cover over a coconut latte. From the start, I envied the five hour lovemaking sessions but quickly realized if I ever HAD five hours, I’d break it up into a 12-15 minute lovemaking session, a yoga class, tea with an old friend, two read-alouds with my girls, an hour to write a poem, a long, hot shower, a 20 minute nap, then go for another quickie! But how fabulous and promising for the future of my domesticity to discover the world that Raab paints for us. I have to say, Diana Raab reproduced for me on PAGE 1, in her very first poem, that which I find most erotic: the cracking of the egg on the head. It’s these deliberate intimacies that fuel the poems. And then there is that whish is far less subtle: “When you take me from behind You remind me how we were Once both animals” (I could point you to the rhyme of behind and remind or I could just let that take you where it will) And yet, Lust is not all endless lovemaking sessions and swelling manhoods (though who could complain if it were?). There is also a creeping into middle age…“Our essence lies on tables/of doctor’s offices/sharing fantasies/of love gone by,” which Raab deals with deftly. Honestly, I’d have loved to see even more of this rawness taken towards the aging female body. I think that Raab could couple her eroticism with even more of these frank realizations. Overall, I’m quite taken with the work Raab has done. While the lusty may get another reader, the tenderness and the seeing and the underneath boiling draw me in, like here, in one of my favorite moments in which she speaks of her grandmother: “I remember/grandma telling me always/want sex because it keeps/your heart beating fast/and your essence vibrant/while on the outside/you stand counting the minutes/for the hard-boiled eggs.” As Raab would say, oh, “this tizzy makes me dizzy.” Looking forward to more from Raab.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
In Lust, Diana Raab celebrates the human capacity for passion, intensity and pleasure. In particular, these erotic poems explore pleasures deeply rooted in physical sensation. Much of the collection's narrative depicts the speaker engaged in an intense sexual affair with a dynamic lover. While one may read the series of poems as a memorable account of a relationship, I see the affair as a metaphor for something larger.  The lover, who is referred to as a muse, a drug, even a healer, seems to personify lust itself. The affair is the speaker's personal dance with Eros. Through this dance, the speaker is enlightened. She experiences the extremities of sexual pleasure, but also, as living with lust intensifies her sensitivities and vulnerabilities, she encounters disappointment and grief. And while she revels in moments of ecstasy, she also acknowledges   that those moments are fleeting. Lust may be fickle, unpredictable, and ephemeral. Clearly, if one lives with lust, he or she may experience risks and challenges. Nevertheless, Raab's poems suggest that a life lived with passion is worth the risk. This is a book of life-affirming poems that celebrate a personal quest for passion and joy.