ISBN-10:
0226410315
ISBN-13:
9780226410319
Pub. Date:
08/28/1986
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
Lysenko Affair / Edition 1

Lysenko Affair / Edition 1

by David Joravsky

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780226410319
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Publication date: 08/28/1986
Edition description: New Edition
Pages: 474
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.10(d)

About the Author

David Joravsky is professor of history at Northwestern University.

Table of Contents

Preface
1. Soviet Ideology as a Problem
2. A Crisis of Faith in Science
3. Harmless Cranks
Michurin
Lysenko and Other Peasant Scientists
4. Raising Stalin's Hand
The First Clashes
Systematic Conflict
5. Stalinist Self-Defeat, 1936-1950
"Discussion"
Terror
The Final "Discussion"
6. Self-Conquest, 1950-1965
Under Stalin
Under Khrushchev
Against Khrushchev
7. Academic Issues: Science
Plant Physiology
Genetics
The Autonomy of Scientists
8. Academic Issues: Marxism
Philosophy
The Human Animal
9. The Criterion of Practice
Potatoes
Corn
Land
10. Ideologies and Realities
Appendix A. Repressed Specialists
Appendix B. For the Kremlinologists
Bibliography
Notes
Index

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Lysenko Affair 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Joravsky's book is informative though confusing. Though Joravsky's writing style was overly verbose at times, I enjoyed his metaphors to evolution about the very people denying it. He realized his limitations, writing while the Soviet Union was still intact, while archives were still closed. My biggest problem with the book was that at the end, he states his thesis as, "Stalinist irrationality functioned as a wasteful and brutal aid to the modernization of agriculture." (Joravsky, 312) I thought a more appropriate culmination of the points in the book is as follows. Soviet officials latched on to Lysenko's pseudoscience because it promised immediate results, and dealt with practical issues, not intellectual, "bourgeois" theory, as genetics and plant physiology do. Soviet officials did not gravitate to Lysenko because they thought it would help them breed a population of perfect communist people; that popular notion originated in the West.