Ma Rainey's Black Bottom

Ma Rainey's Black Bottom

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Overview

Ma Rainey's Black Bottom by August Wilson

The first play Wilson wrote for the Cycle, set in 1927.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781559362993
Publisher: Theatre Communications Group
Publication date: 04/01/2008
Series: August Wilson Century Cycle
Pages: 120
Sales rank: 1,280,094
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.70(h) x 0.50(d)

About the Author

August Wilson was a major American playwright whose work has been consistently acclaimed as among the finest of the American theater. His first play, Ma Rainey's Black Bottom, won the New York Drama Critics' Circle Award for best new play of 1984-85. His second play, Fences, won numerous awards for best play of the year, 1987, including the Tony Award, the New York Drama Critics' Circle Award, the Drama Desk Award, and the Pulitzer Prize. Joe Turner's Come and Gone, his third play, was voted best play of 1987-1988 by the New York Drama Critics' Circle. In 1990, Wilson was awarded his second Pulitzer Prize for The Piano Lesson. He died in 2005.

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Ma Rainey's Black Bottom 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Outstanding! must own DVD!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ma Rainey is a stroy about control. August very masterfully allows his readers to form an opinion on a character before even introducing them, as is the case with Madame Rainey. Although Ma is the leader of the band and can make or break them, the supporting characters, mostly Levee, challenge this leadership with their own opinions which leads to his own demise. Had this been allowed to continue, the band would have split. However Ma kept things together. This book is very carefully done with the intent to open readers to a deeper meaning, although it is with this unclarity that some of the meaning of the main plot is lost.