Madman

Madman

by Groot
4.1 13

Paperback

$10.29 $14.99 Save 31% Current price is $10.29, Original price is $14.99. You Save 31%.
View All Available Formats & Editions

Temporarily Out of Stock Online

Eligible for FREE SHIPPING

Overview

Madman by Groot


IF THERE IS A WAY INTO MADNESS, LOGIC SAYS THERE IS A WAY OUT.  LOGIC SAYS.
 
Tallis, a philosopher’s servant, is sent to a Greek academy in Palestine only to discover that it has silently disappeared.  No one will tell him what happened, but he learns what has become of four or its scholars.  One was murdered.  One committed suicide.  One now worships in the temple of Dionysus.  And one…one is a madman. 
 
From novelist Tracy Groot comes the story of the Gerasene demoniac, a tale of mystery, horror, and hope in the midst of unimaginable darkness. 
 
TRACY GROOT is a novelist and playwright.  In a starred review, Booklist called her first novel, The Borther’s Keeper, “lyrical and affecting.”  Mad mad is Tracy’s third novel and will be available April 1, 2006. 

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780802463623
Publisher: Moody Publishers
Publication date: 04/01/2006
Pages: 320
Product dimensions: 5.58(w) x 8.44(h) x 0.86(d)

About the Author


TRACY GROOT is a part-time writer and co-owner of a popular coffee shop and juice bar. Tracy is author of The Brother's Keeper, Stones of My Accusers and Madman. She, her husband Jack, and their three boys live in Holland, Michigan.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Madman 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Santaanacanyon More than 1 year ago
After reading the overview, I was intrigued with the idea of the story. Alas, found myself reading a very slow plot line. After reading the first five pages, I found I could skip clear to page 95 without missing anything. The expose of the characters is disconnected, and too much space is devoted to describing the sweeping vistas of Israel. The story's action finally picks up on page 136, but doesn't really develop. The story does have a happy ending, but it isn't very climatic. The one bright spot of the story is that it presents an appropriate backdrop to some of the ideas the author wishes to convey. All the same, I felt it could have been done in less than 100 pages.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It wasnt bad nice plot and climax.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Touching & profound. I always wonder how people forget that Jesus lived among people who had real problems & real pain. I think that to live like him, we can't take on all of the worlds problems at once, but maybe if we see a need here, or help eliminate a pain there, we can profoundly reduce the aches that we see around us & heal someone enough that they too can have joy.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Madman is the most uniquely-written biblical fiction I have ever encountered. The characters are incredibly well developed the character names are unique, but easy to remember. Groot draws an incredible portrait of the madman and of the internal struggles we all face. The dialogue is often humorous and is strangely modern, but it works, probably because it is used throughout the novel, so it doesn¿t stick out as anachronistic. The plot is developed astonishingly well and includes several spots of complete surprise. The Palestinian setting adds immensely to the tone of the novel, and the cult of Dionysus is explained well. Groot¿s constant use of excellent, evocative phrases such as, ¿her apron had a little bit of fresh in it from the clothesline,¿ makes readers feel as though they are participating in the story. All too often, biblical fiction falls flat because it¿s a rehash of a story we¿ve read dozens of times, and of characters who have grown old with the rereading. Madman is a fabulous, well-written biblical fiction with characters that come alive, an intriguing plot that focuses on the portion of the story not accounted for in the Bible, and an excellent, subtle portrayal of the gospel message.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Tallis arrives in ancient Palestine, a 'scorched puck of a province' to find out what has happened to the Academy of Socrates, a school funded by his employer, the Greek philosopher Callimachus. What he finds is. . . nothing. No school, no teachers and no pupils. The school disbanded three years ago and the pupils are scattered. Out of a faculty of ten, six teachers have vanished. Of the remaining four, one was murdered, one committed suicide, a female teacher has become a priestess for the ancient god Dionysus and the last is a madman, living in the Gerasene tombs. As Tallis digs deeper for answers he is drawn into a nightmare from his childhood. The horrors he witnessed at the hands of the Maenads will be repeated in the near future unless he finds a way to stop the madness. And stop it he must, or someone close to him will die. Tracy Groot does an excellent job entering the mind of the demonic and showing the reader his torment. Her extensive research is also evident and does a good job at drawing the reader into the world of ancient Palestine. At times, this world is jarred by the use of modern jargon. The reader may also stumble over some of the ancient terminology used. The context in which such words are used isn't always clear. But those are only slight bumps in a book that does an excellent job weaving a story of evil and love, repression and redemption.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ever been captured by the small note in the story of the man called Legion, about the chains and how he used to be chained? Led me to think he must have been loved for someone to risk harm to themselves to chain him, which led me to wonder how did he get that way? What is it like to be so full of demons that you live in tombs and cut yourself? Tracy Groot does an exceptional job of recreating the authentic lifestyle during the time, and an even better job of portraying what life is like for the man called Legion. It is insightful, well told, and a thrilling read, especially when the lives of each of his family members begin to take center stage as well. I'm not yet finished reading it for the second time and have gotten so much more out of it. I LOVE the way each of the characters stories are interwoven and the depth she goes into the heart of mind of the man called Legion. She doesn't shy away, or sugar coat things, and it's the only glimpse I've ever read into the life and mind of someone that has let the enemy take over in their life. However, that's not all the story is - there are many moments of laughter and sweetness and - just read it!
harstan More than 1 year ago
Tallis, servant to the great philosopher Callimachus, travels to the town of Kursi in the Roman Province of Palestine to find out what happened to the Academy of Socrates since the bills for its upkeep have stopped coming. He is incensed to learn the school was dissolved three years ago even though his employer continued to fund it. No one town or the Inn by the Lake overlooking the Galilee will discuss why it closed except to mention that a teacher committed suicide, another was murdered in a gruesome manner and the son of the owner of the Inn Kardus is insane.----- There is a miasma of evil hanging over the area that seems to emulate from Kardus, who apparently is the victim of demonic possession this came about when one of the teachers Portia the high priestess of the Cult of Dionysus leads him into evil though the young man was unaware of his ¿choice¿ at that time. A child sacrifice to Dionysus led by the inn owner¿s servant and Portia is averted when the acolyte turn away from the Evil. Tallis should go back to Athens though he likes the innkeeper¿s daughter but feels unworthy because he can not stop the demonic attacks nor help Kardus. Yet he stays seeking a miracle.----- Tracy Groot imbues a powerful message inside this exciting ancient historical fiction novel and that is people must remain strong and dedicated to the side of righteousness and goodness to prevent evil from gaining a foothold on their soul. First century Palestine comes alive with vivid descriptions that provide a dynamic picture of the people, battling culture, and customs of the times. Readers will like this novel so much they will search for the author¿s backlist (see THE BROTHER¿S KEEPER).----- Harriet Klausner