The Magnificent Ambersons

The Magnificent Ambersons

by Booth Tarkington

Paperback

$9.50
View All Available Formats & Editions
Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for guaranteed delivery by Friday, February 22

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781538060865
Publisher: NOOK Press
Publication date: 01/01/2018
Pages: 276
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.62(d)

About the Author

Newton Booth Tarkington (July 29, 1869 – May 19, 1946) was an American novelist and dramatist best known for his novels The Magnificent Ambersons and Alice Adams. He is one of only three novelists to win the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction more than once, along with William Faulkner and John Updike.Booth Tarkington was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, the son of John S. Tarkington and Elizabeth Booth Tarkington. He was named after his maternal uncle Newton Booth, then the governor of California. He was also related to Chicago Mayor James Hutchinson Woodworth through Woodworth's wife Almyra Booth Woodworth.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

The Magnificent Ambersons 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
curls_99 on LibraryThing 7 months ago
The Magnificent Ambersons Takes place at the turn of the century in your typical, growing Midwestern town. It follows the rise and fall of a wealthy family and shows the fascinating struggle between old money & new money and the struggle faced by many who grow up with old money, feel a sense of entitlement, think they will never have to work a day in their lives, & find out that they are wrong. I loved this book. Social commentary, especially in this time of American history, is my absolute favorite thing to read. I did find it hard to ever have any positive feelings toward the main character, George Amberson Minafer, who was a spoiled brat whom everyone in town hoped would one day "get his come-upance." And, while he eventually does get his "come-upance" by pridefully refusing to work and continuing to spend the family money, by the time he does the town has long ago moved on and no one even remembers him.I would definitely recommend this book. It is a fascinating study in the way that America shifted from truly valuing "Old Money" as the only authentic form of wealth to valuing money only, regardless of whether it is new or old.
jonesli on LibraryThing 7 months ago
A very good read which take place at the turn of the century, published in 1918. George Amberson Minafer is spoiled, arrogant, condescending to both family and others around him. Everyone is hoping for the day when George gets what's coming to him.Changes in the American landscape, automation, and bad investments dwindle the Amberson fortune considerably forcing George to (gasp), get a job in order to support himself and his aunt.There is a beautiful ending to this story when someone who George treated miserably extends an act of kindness to him even after all he had done. I am now looking forward to seeing this movie.
cdogzilla on LibraryThing 10 months ago
Charitably, I suppose you could call this a 'minor classic,' or a 'regional classic,' but it strikes me as more of dated bit of melodrama. It's not hard to see why it might have been popular at it's time, and it no doubt will retain value a look back into tumultuous period (is there any other kind?) in American history. This is one instance where I would definitely recommend the movie (Orson Welles' version) over the source material.
RoseCityReader on LibraryThing 10 months ago
The Magnificent Ambersons is one of those books that I enjoyed more than I thought I would. I was afraid it was going to be heavy and dull, and it certainly wasn't. Still, it was not a favorite of mine. It moved right along through the story of the demise of the once-prominent Amberson family and the growth of their Midwestern town into an industrial city. However, it moved along at such a clip, and with so little thematic subtlety, that it seemed like a book for young adults. I'm not saying that Tarkington should have handled his themes with the heavy hand of Henry James, but a little of Edith Wharton's nuance or F. Scott Fitzgerald's precision would have added depth to the tale.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago