Making the Corps

Making the Corps

by Thomas E. Ricks
4.5 37

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Overview

Making the Corps by Thomas E. Ricks

The bestselling, compelling insider’s account of the Marine Corps from the lives of the men of Platoon 3086—their training at Parris Island, their fierce camaraderie, and the unique code of honor that defines them.

The United States Marine Corps, with its proud tradition of excellence in combat, its hallowed rituals, and its unbending code of honor, is part of the fabric of American myth. Making the Corps visits the front lines of boot camp in Parris Island, South Carolina. Here, old values are stripped away and new Marine Corps values are forged. Bestselling author Thomas E. Ricks follows these men from their hometowns, through boot camp, and into their first year as Marines. As three fierce drill instructors fight a battle for the hearts and minds of this unforgettable group of young men, a larger picture emerges, brilliantly painted, of the growing gulf that divides the military from the rest of America.

Included in this edition is an all-new afterword from the author that examines the war in Iraq through the lens of the Marines from Platoon 3086, giving readers an on-the-ground view of the conflict from those who know it best.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781416559740
Publisher: Scribner
Publication date: 07/31/2007
Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 320
Sales rank: 178,759
File size: 506 KB

About the Author

Thomas E. Ricks is The Washington Post's senior Pentagon correspondent. A member of two Pulitzer Prize-winning teams for national reporting, he has reported on U.S. military activities in Somalia, Haiti, Korea, Bosnia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Kuwait, Turkey, Afghanistan, and Iraq. He is the author of the #1 New York Times bestseller Fiasco: The American Military Adventure in Iraq and A Soldier's Duty.

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Making the Corps 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 38 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I landed aboard PI in September of 1961 and just like these recruits was a confused eighteen year old volunteer as the Marine Corps didn't draft people at the time. After almost fifty years a lot has evidently changed and a lot has not. Like a lot of old Marines I find it hard to believe they can mold recruits without the thumping but times change. My son San Diego 1992 and I both agree that this is the first time we have ever read anything that actually describes the let down you feel when you go from the very regimented and squared away life at boot camp to the troop handlers at ITR or the fact that one of the DI's is the heavy hat. While my thirteen weeks on the island was more like Full Metal Jacket I believe this book would give a young person much better insight into todays boot camp and the things to do to get through it successfully.
MarineParent3021 More than 1 year ago
I am just not sure that I should have read it WHILE my son was at Parris Island. It was real and scurate but I could only read it in short times before getting myself upset and worrying about my son. That being said I am glad that I did read it. IT let me into a very bubble like time of my sons life that he was hesitant to let me in. Because I knew things and had specific questions he was opened up more I think. I would recomend that every parent that has a child at Parris Island read Making the Corps. Just leave enough time to read it
oddball193 More than 1 year ago
I read this book prior to starting a fire academy and I found it not only inspirational, but perhaps a little preperatory for what I was to experience. I am amazed at how similar I felt to the Boots as they progressed and especially their disappointment with "the real world" after they graduated. Thsi is a very well written book that provides the reader with a great insight into USMC boot camp as well as the culture and thinking of such a great, yet threatened branch of the military.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the best book i have ever read about the Marine Corps. I am going to sign up after my first year in college and this book got me more pumped for what im going to experience than any book i have read. A must read for anyone who is interested in military topics.
Anonymous 28 days ago
Fairly accurate perception
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was there. This book is about my platoon. What Ricks writes is accurate, however, it is far from the whole story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Brought me back 30+ years to 1980 when I went to Parris Island and joined the Marines.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a story of platoon 3086. Men who came to Parris Island and wanted to become Marines. Some wash out and some survived. It gives you some details of what goes on in the minds of the young recruits and the DI's. 1995 Recruit training Parris Island, the boot camp that the army don't teach you. You want to join the elite than take this book and make it knowledge to prepare your self. Need to make a Boot Camp book of Camp Pendleton in the 21st century.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Making the Corps is an isightful book that is a must read for anyone considering the Marine Corps.
Guest More than 1 year ago
this book is ok...but for the Marine who wants to relive the four following years...when a Marine is really made, when the brotherhood shows through, I agree with another reviewer and say the best thing to do is pick up the book from Chadz (stand by to fall out) july 2003. All Marines know this truth...you get scared in bootcamp and follow orders through the unknown and a regimented list that DIs follow daily. Basically, like this book, it gives you a skeleton look of what it is gonna take to be CONSIDERED a Marine, but the time you prove your worthyness and are actually raised to the hights of the world's finest is when you do your time in a grunt unit for the next fours years after the first 13 weeks this book speaks to. Ok for parents, but all Marines would rather read about what they truely remember...the next four years. Again..not bad, but I would recommend the other book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ricks lets the reader see what for the most part goes on in bootcamp. There of course is the realization that 'behind closed doors' activities would never be allowed to make the presses. This book is good for the DEP Marine wanting to know what he should expect, yet to know the backround of the next four years, I suggest this book then 'Stand By to Fall Out' from Chadz to see what the Corps is really about.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ricks nailed the bullseye with his recap of a training cycle at Marine recruit training. But as Dan Da Cruz said in his book (BOOT), there are a little less than 4 years that follow that makes the boy a Marine. Boot camp and it's structured discipline gives the guidelines, yet Marines will learn to adapt and make their careers either a benifit to the Marine Corps or a thorn in the Corps' side. P. Chadz writes of his first four years after he graduated HONOR MAN out of boot camp, (Stand By to Fall Out) and reading Ricks, Da Cruz and Chadz in that order will give a new Marine the full monty as to what will be expected and witnessed by him on a first tour. Marines are the first to go and last to know, but reading these 'must reads' will give all new Marines the wear-with-all to not get hamstringed in either boot camp or the duties on bases and beacheads in the years that follow.