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Malaga Burning: An American Woman's Eyewitness Account of the Spanish Civil War
     

Malaga Burning: An American Woman's Eyewitness Account of the Spanish Civil War

by Gamel Woolsey, Zalin Grant (Introduction)
 
MALAGA BURNING-AN AMERICAN WOMAN'S EYEWITNESS ACCOUNT OF THE SPANISH CIVIL WAR is a dramatic, beautiful and moving story. Through vivid character sketches and personal observations, Woolsey describes the people caught up in the bloody conflict.

Overview

MALAGA BURNING-AN AMERICAN WOMAN'S EYEWITNESS ACCOUNT OF THE SPANISH CIVIL WAR is a dramatic, beautiful and moving story. Through vivid character sketches and personal observations, Woolsey describes the people caught up in the bloody conflict.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
While its scars and memories still run deep, the Spanish civil war is undergoing a process of historicization. The Spanish monarchy has welcomed veterans of the International Brigades as part of a process of reconciliation, and literature previously interpreted in political contexts is now being analyzed from cultural and intellectual perspectives. In these contexts, the first American edition of "Malaga Burning" offers both a still-unfamiliar eyewitness view of the war and a window on its processing by contemporaries. Woolsey, an American poet, and her English husband, author Gerald Brenan, were vaguely of the Left, but not political activists. They moved to a Spanish village in 1932 to live cheaply and to get away from an increasingly turbulent Europe. War came to them with an anarchist uprising in the nearby city of Malaga in 1936. Brenan responded by producing a still-classic account of events, "The Spanish Labyrinth." Woolsey, by contrast, tells the story of everyday lives amidst "the pornography of violence" a phrase originally hers. She depicts people, Spanish and English, caught in a conflict that triggered a spectrum of class, religious, political and regional hostilities over a century in the making. Her Spaniards in particular bear marks of literary constructions, perceived rather than understood by their portrayer. Woolsey's nuanced insistence that the war's violence and cruelty were not reflections of a particular "Spanish character" nevertheless remains a refreshing contrast to the crude cultural anthropology of Hemingway and his counterparts. Her clear, compelling style, meanwhile, highlights the analytical and descriptive capabilities of the declarative English sentence.
Library Journal - Library Journal
Little known in this country, Woolsey was living with her English husband, Gerald Brenan, also a writer, in southern Spain at the outbreak of that country's civil war. Brenan's citizenship provided the couple with a measure of personal safety from the dangers of the war. Eventually, however, bombs fell close to their home, and they left for England after successfully helping a neighboring family to escape. Woolsey's insightful, reflective account of the war does not take political sides or discuss politics at any length. Rather, hers is a sympathetic description of the Spanish people around her. She is rightly skeptical of the many atrocity stories that circulated at the time and saddened by all the destruction and violence. This elegantly written book, first published in England in 1939 as "Death's Other Kingdom", adds an unusual viewpoint to the many personal narratives on the subject of the Spanish Civil War. Appropriate for modern history collections in public and academic libraries. Patricia A. Beaber, Coll. of New Jersey Lib., Eawing

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780964873612
Publisher:
Pythia Press
Publication date:
01/02/1998
Pages:
204
Product dimensions:
5.63(w) x 8.68(h) x 0.86(d)

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