The Male Factor: The Unwritten Rules, Misperceptions, and Secret Beliefs of Men in the Workplace

The Male Factor: The Unwritten Rules, Misperceptions, and Secret Beliefs of Men in the Workplace

by Shaunti Feldhahn
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The Male Factor: The Unwritten Rules, Misperceptions, and Secret Beliefs of Men in the Workplace 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
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Maria_Marino More than 1 year ago
What working woman wouldn't want a free pass inside her male colleagues' head and figure out just "what was he thinking?" While being transported inside a man's brain is unrealistic, The Male Factor accomplishes the next best thing. Based on seven years of extensive research pulling results from confidential interviews with thousands of men, this book is a valuable tool for understanding and navigating the workplace rules from a man's perspective. Exploring a topic that lends itself to sensationalism, the depth and integrity of the research is vital to substantiating its credibility and foundational to it being taken seriously. It validates the observations in the book as reliable and the genuine response of real men in real situations. What is commendable about The Male Factor is that spells out up front that it is not intended to throw a universal blanket statement that relegates all men into a one size fits all standard fabric. It takes into account a man's individuality and admits that not everyone fits the mold. Likewise, each reader can expect to apply the concepts as it relates to her experience and situation. The goal is to present the evidence necessary to make informed decisions by examining the working world through male-coloured lenses. The book does not just dispense facts and findings and leave you hanging. It is informative and useful, offering alternatives and suggestions on what women can do to get themselves on the same side of the fence as their male counterparts. It establishes common ground by not only communicating the "why" but also the "how." The Male Factor is subtitled, "the groundbreaking research that reveals what every woman should know". I would agree with that claim. Even for those who are well-versed in the intricate details of how a man's brain is wired and have found joy and success working with men, this book still has plenty to offer. I would definitely recommend reading it from cover to cover so you won't miss a thing. You may also want to keep a journal or notepaper close by - and perhaps a few highlighters. Though the journey will be uniquely yours, some takeaways include: .Articulate your point or concern then let it go and move on . Get to the point quickly . Never start a conversation with a man by asking him "why" or jump in with "You need to.what you need to do." advice . Don't take things at work personally . Find out how men perceive and process emotions . Know what being treated with respect and trust looks like in a man's eye . Why you're not likely to see a man ask for help What perhaps stands out as the most empowering and encouraging facet in The Male Factor is that none of its recommendations and insights negates or asks a woman to change who she really is or deny the strengths and qualities that are inherent in most women. What it does is erase the "I didn't know" factor and makes women more clued-in when interacting with men in the workplace by being aware of his vantage point. Undoubtedly, as you read the book, you will shake your head and say, "if only I had known I would have approached it differently." And that is the whole point of The Male Factor. It's about converting knowledge into tangible results. The bottom line is that understanding the male culture at work magnifies a woman's effectiveness and ultimately adds value to and prospers the organization. At the end of the day, it creates a partnership that challenges each oth
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
oregonchainreader More than 1 year ago
This was actually written for women who are not understanding how men operate, how can men say "it's not personal, it's just business" and other misunderstandings. Ms. Feldhahn comprehensively surveyed men from a wide variety of jobs, ages, ethnicities and salarys. She found out how men worked and then presented the findings in a very understandable way. She points out the differences in how actions are perceived between men and women, how what one may find inconsequential is a major faux paux to the other. I found out some things that I did not know about how women communicate and why sometimes there are disagreements over communication and moving forward on a project. Although this is written primarily for women, many men would do well to read this also.
Jennmarie68 More than 1 year ago
Shaunti Feldhahn spent many years collecting data about how men think, that led her to start collecting information about how men perceive women in the workplace. At first I thought that this would be a bunch of statistics and charts. There were some statistics and charts but that was not the meat of the book. Most of the book explains what men are thinking about working women, why they think that way, and what changes a woman could make to be better accepted by the men she works with. There were so many things that I didn't really think would actually hinder a woman's ability to move up in the corporate world. But most of these things were things that all (or most) women do instinctively that men think are unprofessional. Then there were the things that I've learned in my own experiences that I thought were fairly common knowledge amongst women (but apparently they are not). One of the things that was most shocking to me is the way women dress, even when we think we look professional, can be very distracting to men. I won't go into specifics, but I think it's interesting, especially when you go to her website and see some examples... I liked how she looked at the inherent differences between how men and women think and how the brain is wired for each gender to have these differences of thought. Even though I've recognized these differences on my own I never even realized that they would affect how a woman is perceived at work. I also liked how each fact was followed up with a quote from a man that she had interviewed. The quotes were very pertinent and really made me think about the point the man was trying to make. I really liked this book. Not only was it interesting but I think that it was enlightening. Just as Feldhahn says, you may not agree with everything she discovered about men, but if you can at least understand it then you could be doing yourself a huge favor.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Okay , if you ever wondered why women face things in the workplace that make you want to pull your hair out; then you should read this book. Did you know that the way a woman dresses in the workplace can affect how a man reacts to her as a professional? Some men see womens work clothes as a camouflage. They think that women purposely try to avert coworkers attention to their physical attributes to attempt to cover up professional faults. Also the way a woman constructs her sentences can be taken the wrong way. Of course I'm sure not all male coworkers feel the same way but still this book is a handy one for your shelf if you are a female working professional. There is some great information to help you whether you are already in the workplace or are planning to enter it soon. Lots of great stuff to take into account. This book was provided for review by the WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group.
devasha More than 1 year ago
Women across corporate America strive to understand their male colleagues. They read books, attend seminars, and have meetings, but often fall short in this matter. Compiling years of research and anonymous interviews with men in the workplace-from CEO's to the guy at the desk next to you, best-selling author Shaunti Feldhahn's new book, The Male Factor, bridges the gap in understanding the male psyche. Subtitled "The Unwritten Rules, Misperceptions, and Secret Beliefs of Men in the Workplace," Feldhahn hits the mark on many issues that women struggle with in relation to their male coworkers. She covers such topics as: why men in the workplace almost always view displays as emotion as the inability to think clearly why revealing clothing may be sabotaging your career why respect is imperative why men separate work and their personal lives and expect you to do so, too The Male Factor contains over 300 pages of information, surveys, charts, and quotes from real men. It is not an easy read, but serves as more of a handbook for working women. Although I am not in the corporate workplace, The Male Factor broadened my understanding of the way men think. I was surprised by many of the author's findings, and encouraged that there are small things I can do to increase respect and communication with male coworkers. I especially enjoyed the final chapter, written especially for Christian women, which provided Scriptural principles for the workplace. This book should be required reading for all women who work with men, whether in a Fortune 500 company or at the local Subway.
Carolynsfo More than 1 year ago
I happened on Shaunti Feldhahn's book For Women Only a couple of years ago. I wasn't in the market for a book on relationships or how the male mind works. But the book offered some excellent perspectives and some eye-opening insights about why men do what they do; and how the women who love them must respond and behave. I have recommended it to many of my women clients and workshop participants. So, I was excited to read Feldhahn's newest work, The Male Factor. This book looks at the inner workings of men in the workplace from a Christian perspective. There is already the proverbial glass ceiling when it comes to women in the workplace. Not only do women have to navigate their way through the job market, but also when they get the job they must navigate a different kind of ship. Trying to figure out how to behave around male colleagues, bosses and customers doesn't leave much room for doing a good job, let alone being her best. Many talented women today risk undermining their careers without realizing it, simply because they don't understand how they are perceived by their male colleagues and customers. In The Male Factor, some of the issues we learn about are men's unwritten "rules" of the workplace; how men perceive workplace emotion; and why revealing clothing can sabotage a woman's effectiveness in the workplace. "Never before has an author gotten inside the hearts and minds of men in the workplace - from CEO's to non-profit managers, from lawyers to factory workers - to discover what they commonly think about women on the job, what their expected "rules" of the workplace are, what "managing emotion" means, and what factors improve or harm a man's respect for a female co-worker." ~ From the inside book jacket The Male Factor equips women with the information they need to make informed decisions and compete on a level playing field. This book was provided for review by the WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have to say I was very excited to hear about this book. Many of you may have heard of For Women Only and For Men Only, two books by Shaunti Feldhahn to help understand the inner worlds of the opposite sex based on survey results and interviews. Well, she has done it again. The Male Factor is Feldhahn's look into the inner world of men in the workplace. The workplace is still dominated by rules, expectations, and assumptions that make it still highly a "man's world." After hundreds of surveys and personal interviews, Feldhahn explores just what the means and how women can understand this secret world in order to better navigate and succeed. She explains that many of the men she interviewed sincerely want women to be successful and wanted to pass on information about what women do to basically shoot their careers in the foot. As she did in For Women Only, Feldhahn takes different assumptions, like "it's business, it's not personal" and looks at what the means to a man and why that is different than what it means to a woman hearing that statement. Feldhahn discusses why even at work women need to pay attention to the fact that men are highly visual creatures. And of course, one of my favorites, was the discussion about being emotional at work and how men and women interpret that differently. This book was an enjoyable read. Feldhahn uses direct quotes and examples to really explain each point. She is careful to explain that she is not saying one way is right and another wrong, but merely helping to explain how it is so that women can then do what they like with the information. I think that I learned a lot from this book. I've asked my husband a few things (like: really, you don't take that personally? or really, that distracts you?) and it will probably help me relate to his work world a bit better. There also were times when I was reading that I thought "Oh, that explains that time when..." I highly recommend this book. If you are in the workplace, I think you could learn many things to help you relate better to the men you work with. Ladies, you don't have to be in the workplace right now to appreciate and learn from this book. There are principles that could help you in ministry, volunteering, or understanding your husband's work world. It's also just interesting to read about how different men and women can be!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Many talented women today risk undermining their careers without realizing it, simply because they don't understand how they are perceived by their male colleagues and customers. In What Men really Think, best-selling author Shaunti Feldhahn reveals the inner reality behind men's views - the unspoken expectations that no man would dare to publicly acknowledge, and no woman would learn from an HR department. These revelations include: . Men's unwritten 'rules' of the workplace . How men perceive workplace emotion . What common situations with female colleagues most frustrate men-- and why . Why revealing clothing can sabotage a woman's effectiveness . Why some men think flextime is fine, but equal compensation for it is not What Men Really Think equips women with the information they need to make informed decisions and compete on a level playing field. This book gave me some insight into working with a male boss again. From the chapter about emotions in the workplace to the chapter on the little things that drive men crazy, there were many insightful tidbits to help a woman in a male run workplace. Shaunti put a lot of research and time into the information in the book. And while there was information specifically for the Christian, it could be easily missed throughout the book. There was a chapter on putting it into perspective at the end of the book directed specifically toward the Christian woman. I enjoyed reading and learning about the male thoughts on emotion in the workplace, how men compartmentalize their thoughts and duties, and how perceptive they can be toward women in the workplace. I hope to apply some of this information in my own position.
Richele More than 1 year ago
The Male Factor is essential reading for today's working woman. When ordering please be sure to get the expanded edition which has faith-based wisdom and an added chapter with valuable information from experienced Christian working women. I found this book insightful and surprising! You will read about how men handle emotional situations in the workplace or what they interpret as an assault to their character. After reading some of the book I asked my husband for his opinion and he stated the book was spot on. I am not currently in the workforce yet I found this book to offer an inside look into men's attitudes that is invaluable. This book centers on the relationships between men and women in the workplace, however, the wisdom you gain extends beyond. (*book provided for review by waterbrook publishing)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Let's face it - men and women are just different. Not just in personal relationships, but in the business world as well. Shaunti Feldhahn's new book "The Male Factor" gives readers a peek into "the unwritten rules, misperceptions, and secret beliefs of men in the workplace." This book was provided for review by the WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group. Feldhahn and her research team have gathered insights from hundreds of men in the business world through surveys and interviews to answer this core question: "Is there anything you've seen talented women do that undermines their effectiveness with men, simply because the women don't know how it is being perceived?" Beginning with differences in the structure of the male and female brain, and exploring topics such as "It's not personal, it's business," the emotional side of women, getting the job done no matter what, and other ways women may unknowingly undermine their full potential in the workplace, the men, many of whom are high-level executives, give feedback to the core question, and practical advice for women to work more effectively with men on the job. What did I like about the book? Feldhahn tells in the introduction how she was able to get men to first of all take the survey, and secondly be honest in their answers. Most of the men quoted in the book genuinely want women to be successful. What I didn't like so much? The book seems to be directed toward women in white-collar, high-level, or at least upwardly-mobile career paths. I would also have liked to see some references to how working-class Joe the Plumber men would answer the core question, to see if their answers are in line with the CEO's and CFO's answers. Would I recommend this book? I believe this book is beneficial to women who wish to advance in their careers, or who are starting careers in competitive, traditionally male-dominated fields. A word of caution though. Some women may take offense to the subjects brought up by the men who were interviewed, for example, the chapter about how men react to some wardrobe choices. The underlying intent of this book is for it to be read with the perception of a mentor giving constructive feedback how to improve how you relate with male colleagues.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Here