Manchild in the Promised Land

Manchild in the Promised Land

Paperback(Reprint)

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Overview

Manchild in the Promised Land by Claude Brown

With more than two million copies in print, Manchild in the Promised Land is one of the most remarkable autobiographies of our time—the definitive account of African-American youth in Harlem of the 1940s and 1950s, and a seminal work of modern literature.

Published during a literary era marked by the ascendance of black writers such as Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, and Alex Haley, this thinly fictionalized account of Claude Brown’s childhood as a hardened, streetwise criminal trying to survive the toughest streets of Harlem has been heralded as the definitive account of everyday life for the first generation of African Americans raised in the Northern ghettos of the 1940s and 1950s.

When the book was first published in 1965, it was praised for its realistic portrayal of Harlem—the children, young people, hardworking parents; the hustlers, drug dealers, prostitutes, and numbers runners; the police; the violence, sex, and humor.

The book continues to resonate generations later, not only because of its fierce and dignified anger, not only because the struggles of urban youth are as deeply felt today as they were in Brown’s time, but also because of its inspiring message. Now with an introduction by Nathan McCall, here is the story about the one who “made it,” the boy who kept landing on his feet and grew up to become a man.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781451631579
Publisher: Touchstone
Publication date: 12/27/2011
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 416
Sales rank: 111,011
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 8.40(h) x 1.10(d)

About the Author

Claude Brown was born in New York City and grew up in Harlem. At age seventeen, after serving several terms in reform school, he left Harlem for Greenwich Village. He went on to receive a bachelor's degree from Howard University and attended law school. He also wrote a book called The Children of Ham in 1976. Manchild in the Promised Land evolved from an article he published in Dissent magazine during his first year at college. He died in 2002 at the age of 64.

Nathan McCall, author of Makes Me Wanna Holler, has worked as a journalist for The Washington Post. Currently, he teaches in the African American Studies Department at Emory University and lives in Atlanta, Georgia.

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Manchild in the Promised Land 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 52 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Manchild in the promise land is a well written book, however, I just could not bring myself to be interested in reading it completely. I've read other books such as Down These Mean Streets, Bodega Dreams and many more and have not been able to put these books down, however, reading Manchild in the promise land was just grueling to get through to the point that I just put it down. The acknowledgement of the life of an innercity child raised in poverty, the childs exposure to the products of it's environment and then triumph are amazing. I just could not brace myself to follow the story through to the end. If my fiance read this book, he would most likely enjoy it more than I did. It just seems as a male's book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have read this book three times and I am still fascinated with it.
Tmikallpoole More than 1 year ago
An Outstanding Book!!!!  5 Star!!  I read this book in 1970 in 10th grade English class.  Read it from cover to cover. Received an A grade on the book report!  A book on urban neighborhood lower class to middle class lifestyles of Black America.  I lived alot of this book in the 1970's thru 1980's.
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Great book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book. Read it. I assure you  you will be blessed by this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was introduded to this book when i was a little girl growing up in north philly. Very good reading.
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HpFan110 More than 1 year ago
Manchild in the Promised Land is an autobiography about Claude Brown in which he discusses the actualities of life, how life in the ghetto was not an easy task at hand. As Claude grows up all the odds were against him, saying he is going to do drugs and be in and out of prison his whole life. When he realizes that being a junkie is not what he wants to do, he goes back to school to get an education and pursues a love in playing the Piano. Manchild in the Promised Land also has a lot of critical themes such as racism. Being that they were in Harlem, New York in the 50's all the racism is direct towards the residents of Harlem. If they had kids, the kids were just expected to cut school and do drugs because they were colored and that's how Harlem life was. When Claude starts interacting with white people it is frowned upon. This is a truly inspiring novel. It was a fantastic book to read. It shows how people, no matter how bad their past is, can have a great future. This book installs hope into individuals who feel as if there life has taken a turn for the worst. I strongly recommend this book to those who are down and need an uplifting story to hear in their time of need. I enjoyed this book very much, it had the perfect balance between action and heartfelt moments where you connected to the character on and emotional level where they were your friend and not like you were on the outside looking in. While reading this book I was found myself not wanting to put it down because I always had to know if Claude beat the odds or not. From that point he wasn't a character, he was my family and I had to see if he was going to make it or not. All in all, this book was a fantastic read and I strongly recommend it for anyone who needs inspiration or for anyone who likes a good read. This is one of the best books I have ever read!
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GCU_Kid2011 More than 1 year ago
"Manchild in the Promise Land," a classically written autobiography by author Claude Brown in which he significantly discusses to each viewer the actualities of life, furthermore; nicely detailing how life is lived in the ghetto communities in America. As I began reading, I found myself emotionally attached to his literature because of his injection of factuality in which was nicely vaccinated into the body of his composition. The author truly and compositionally poured every inch and ounce of experiences that he had encountered during his lifespan on God's green earth into the cup of veracious literacy. Claude Brown openly reveals to each reader life experiences, furthermore, the book begins to inform initially readers about his life as an adolescent. Nevertheless, the author informs each reader about the destruction of his community in which was caused by poverties, inebriations (drugs and alcohols), illegal organization and performances (crimes). The author basically reveals to his audience the ups and downturns of living in ghetto. Furthermore, after my completion of reading the entire book, I would like to say finally that this is a book for all ages. Nevertheless, this book that is based on real life experiences. "Manchild in the Promise Land" is a classic book!
TJSchumpert More than 1 year ago
I read this book in my African American Literature class. I have read this book 4 times and plan to have my sons read it once they get older. I love this book! It is definitely a must have for anyone's library.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
read-n-24-7 More than 1 year ago
I love this book...it's still relevant in 2010. I love the way the author didn't hold anything back when describing his frends and situations that they were in. You could literally imagine a day in Sonny's shoes.
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