The Mango Season

The Mango Season

by Amulya Malladi
4.3 21

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Mango Season 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
karinaCA More than 1 year ago
highly recommened
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this book. Once I started this book I couldn't put it down. I recommended this book to all my friends.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Wow!! what a story! This book is a hope for those Indian-Paki Americans involved in an interracial relationships, which includes myself. I'm dating my Caucasian college sweetheart for 5 years, and his actions are more Indian than Indians I met in the States. Nobody discusses this issue in our society and I'm glad the author did. Its about time! I can fully understand the main character's stubborn irrational parents, not willing to be open minded. My generation is still not ready to settle outside our race because it would make it harder for people in our society to accept interracial relationships, which is a shame. I loved that main characther confronted her parents to accept her for who she loves and not be like other Indian-Americans to go home and get married to a stranger (just because he would be an Indian). This book also shows that those Indian-Americans that go back home are typically involved in previous relationships in the States, and come to India to shop for a spouse. This book gave me courage to stand up to my parents one day when I want to marry my boyfriend.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book in 8th grade when I began to have affections for America, and felt farther away from my home country. While I still embrace my heritage, my birthplace is where I am from and American is what I am. I'm not Indian. I'm Korean Amercan, and I am not even 18. But cultural conflicts I faced as an immigrant woman (or girl) was reason enough to make the book touch my heart. Yes, this book is only fiction, but this book made me feel like I wasn't the only one who had struggles like her. I could almost taste the frustrations Priya had. I've read some of the sour reviews on this page, but I don't think this book deserves it. Maybe being in a similar situation like her made me appreciate this book a bit more. I loved it.
Two2dogs More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this book, living your own life and keeping family happy is very hard to do.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Write more but dont copy Bluestars proficy
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm not copying any books.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm only a few chapters into the book. I'm enjoying the characters and basic storyline, but the editing, or lack thereof, is driving me completely mad. There's a chapter where Priya's aunt talks about her pregnancy and the next chapter she is shocked to hear about the pregnancy from another aunt. It's like things were never placed in the proper order. There are also other inconsistencies and errors.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Disappointing, to say the least. After reading South Asian voices like Arundhati Roy, Jhumpa Lahiri, Vikram Seth, and Salman Rushdie, this book came across as an ambitious flop. The plot's not bad. Technically speaking, the writing is not especially bad. But that's the kindest thing you can say about this book. There's no magic, there's no suspense. Malladi tries and fails to capture India with formulaic, forgettable writing; her characterizations leave much to be desired, and for a book that's supposedly about cross-cultural, cross-generation conflict, the conflict's not all that worrisome and the happy ending is rather predictable. There's one small ironic twist, but even that seemed too contrived. Malladi gets some of the generalizations right, but completely misses out on the pure magic of India, captured in its beauty and bigotry, advancement and poverty, sainthood and corruption. Anyway, compared to some of the other trash out there, The Mango Season is not really that awful. Who knows, you might like it. But I recomemend reading it at your local library rather than making a purchase - this made-for-the-masses yawner isn't worth more than a few hours of your time, and certainly not worth your money. If you want really well written South Asian/Indian fiction, look at the recs below.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Being married to an American born Indian, to me it was like reading my personal diary. Very true and realistic though I did not go through the 'family resistence' Priya went through. Wish the book never ended.
Guest More than 1 year ago
You really can't go home again, and Priya Rao didn't want to either. She had to though. After her mother's youngest brother eloped, Priya knew she had to tell her family face to face that she was engaged to marry an American. What follows is a humorous, heartwarming story of a woman struggling to retain all her roles; daughter, granddaughter, sister, Indian and lover. Intermingled with her mother's expectations, her father's compassion, her grandfather's manipulation are the sights, sounds and smells of India--the India that is foreign, yet familiar to Priya. By showing the reader the flaws in India, Amulya Malladi has managed to show us why it's also exotic and mysterious.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book transported me to India right away. All those recipes in the book are just fabulous because the cooking is integrated so well into the story. I thought that Priya's boyfriend, Nick was a little too understanding, but hey, I am sure there are a lot of nice guys out there.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I picked this book up after reading a review in Woman's Day magazine; it was worth it. I laughed out loud while reading it. Priya's mother is awesome (a super nag as the writer calls it) and so close to so many mothers I know. I guess mother-daughter relationships are universally weird and Amulya Malladi does a great job of illustrating that. I really got to see India in this book; and I enjoyed the cooking so much. This is different from the food we get in a lot of Indian restaurants and I think I may try to make a few based on the recipes in the book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is in the trend of the popular chick lit novels, only it is with an Indian heroine. I enjoyed this book very much, especially all the scenes in the kitchen with the cooking and the smells. Can't wait to read more books by this author!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Funny, delightful and unpredicatble, THE MANGO SEASON is an awesome read. I loved Priya and how she struggled to tell her family about Nick, her American fiance. I loved her aunts, both Sowmya and Lata were amazing women. I just went and bought Amulya Malladi's first book, A BREATH OF FRESH AIR and I can't wait to read it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This story is about Priya, born and raised in India, who comes to the United States to do her masters in computer sciences. She gets settled in Silicon Valley and finds an American fiance. She goes home to south India to tell her family about the American in her life; and comic disaster hits. All the characters in Priya's family, from her loud mother to her conservative grandfather to her understanding father and aunts, are wonderfully described. I especially liked the way the author showed how food is cooked in south Indian homes; and how mango pickle is made.