ISBN-10:
1520002815
ISBN-13:
9781520002811
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Overview

The backbone of Mansfield Park is based around the marriages of sisters Lady Bertram, Mrs. Norris, and Mrs. Price. Each of these sisters marries a man from a different social class. Lady Bertram marries an extremely wealthy baronet Sir Thomas Bertram; Mrs. Norris marries a clergyman that makes a decent living; and Mrs. Price marries a naval lieutenant, who is injured shortly after they marry causing his career to end with living in poverty. This tale revolves around Fanny Price, who lives in poverty until being sent to live with her wealthy Aunt Bertram. While received warmly at first, what unfolds is a life of cold neglect and further trouble in her new lifestyle.



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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781520002811
Publisher: Dreamscape Media
Publication date: 05/10/2016
Edition description: Unabridged
Sales rank: 714,641
Product dimensions: 6.04(w) x 5.04(h) x 1.13(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Jane Austen (1775-1817) was an English writer focusing mainly on romantic fiction, and society and life in the 19th century. Austen's titles are revered around the world and still widely sought after. Austen had her family encouraging her throughout her writing career. She originally published her writing anonymously. Austen's novels include: Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility, Mansfield Park, Emma, Northanger Abbey, and Persuasion.

Anna is a hugely experienced audiobook narrator have recorded a wide variety of audiobooks including classics to teenage sci-fi, children's and animation.

Date of Birth:

December 16, 1775

Date of Death:

July 18, 1817

Place of Birth:

Village of Steventon in Hampshire, England

Place of Death:

Winchester, Hampshire, England

Education:

Taught at home by her father

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Chapter I
(Continues…)



Excerpted from "Mansfield Park"
by .
Copyright © 2003 Jane Austen.
Excerpted by permission of Penguin Publishing Group.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
Introduction
Jane Austen: A Brief Chronology
A Note on the Text

Mansfield Park

Appendix A: The Theatricals at Mansfield Park

  1. August von Kotzebue, from Lovers’ Vows
  2. Austen family correspondence, from The Austen Papers
  3. Erasmus Darwin, from A Plan for the Conduct of Female Education in Boarding Schools
  4. Thomas Gisborne, from “On Amusements in General”

Appendix B: Religion

  1. Jane Austen’s prayers, from The Works of Jane Austen
  2. Hannah More, Strictures on the Modern System of Female Education
  3. William Wilberforce, from A Practical View of the Prevailing Religious System of Professed Christians
  4. Dr. John Gregory, from “Religion”

Appendix C: Ideals of Femininity

  1. Henry Austen, from “Biographical Notice” of Jane Austen
  2. Thomas Gisborne, from “On the Importance of the Female Character”
  3. Dr. John Gregory, from “Conduct and Behaviour”
  4. Hannah More, from “The Benefits of Restraint”

Appendix D: “The Improvement of the Estate”

  1. William Cowper, from The Garden
  2. Humphry Repton, from Observations on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening

Appendix E: The West Indian Connection

  1. A Permanent and Effectual Remedy Suggested for the Evils Under Which the British West Indies Now Labour
  2. Joseph Lowe, from An Inquiry into the State of the British West Indies
  3. Excerpt from Frank Austen’s notebook 1808, from Jane Austen’s Sailor Brothers
  4. Thomas Clarkson, from The History of the Rise, Progress, and Accomplishment of the Abolition of the African Slave-Trade
  5. Hannah More, “The Sorrows of Yamba or the Negro Woman’s Lamentation”

Appendix F: Women’s Education

  1. Thomas Gisborne, from “On Female Education”
  2. Thomas Gisborne, from “On Parental Duties”
  3. Hannah More, from “Comparison of the Mode of Female Education in the Last Age With That of the Present Age”
  4. Maria Edgeworth and Richard Lovell Edgeworth, from “Prudence and Economy”
  5. Mary Wollstonecraft, from “Introduction” to A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

Appendix G: Contemporary Reception of Mansfield Park

  1. Richard Whateley, from Quarterly Review, January 1821
  2. Excerpt from “Opinions of Mansfield Park: collected and transcribed by Jane Austen”
  3. Excerpt from “Opinions of Emma: collected and transcribed by Jane Austen”

Appendix H: Jane Austen’s Letters and Mansfield Park

  1. Letter from JA to Cassandra Austen. January 1813
  2. Letter from JA to Francis Austen. July 1813
  3. Letter from JA to Francis Austen. September 1813

Works Cited and Recommended Reading

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From the Publisher

"McCaddon is the ideal choice to present this classic...a nineteenth-century 'tell all' just as impossible to resist as the tabloids in the check-out line." —-AudioFile

Reading Group Guide

1. Though it was very successful, Jane Austen deemed Pride and Prejudice, her second novel, rather too light.? As Carol Shields mentions in her Introduction, Austen hoped to address more serious issues in her next novel, Mansfield Park. Many readers and critics think Mansfield Park is Austen's most serious and most profound novel. How does it differ from Sense and Sensibility and Pride and Prejudice — How are her treatments of class, gender, relationships, and most especially, faith, more nuanced and more mature?

2. Describe the social positions of the three Ward sisters Lady Bertram, Mrs. Norris, and Mrs. Price. How did they arrive at such different circumstances and how have their circumstances presumably affected their personalities? How do the sisters treat each other and how much of this is the result of their respective status?

3. As soon as Sir Thomas decides to accept responsibility for one of Mrs. Price's children, Fanny is put into an unusual position. Sir Bertram says, although she is to live with them, she is not a Miss Bertram . . . their rank, fortune, rights and expectations will always be different.? Describe the family's feelings for Fanny as the novel develops. How does the treatment of Fanny by Mrs. Norris and the Bertram sisters distinguish her from the rest of the children? How does Fanny feel about the Bertrams and how do her feelings change, especially for Sir Bertram and Edmund? Before her marriage, what changes take place that allow for her acceptance in the family?

4. Fanny Price inspires strong reactions in readers; she is cast by some as a dreary killjoy, and by others as an endearing, admirable heroine. Is this dichotomy Austen's intention? Discuss the ways in which Fanny embodies both sides of this polarized debate. What is your opinion of her in relation to other well-known female protagonists of the day?

5. Mansfield Park was divided into three volumes, published separately. Why do you think Austen chose this structure, and how does it affect your reading of the book? Think about other writing that employs this structure to inform your response.

6. From the moment the idea is suggested, Edmund is against the staging of a play. Why is the play seen as inappropriate by both Edmund and Fanny? Why, once it is decided upon, does Edmund accept a part in the play, even though he would appear a hypocrite? How much of this license was taken because of the absence of Sir Thomas and how much was simply the influence of Tom? What is the significance of their choice of plays, Lover's Vows?

7. Describe the similarities and differences between the courtship of Edmund and Mary and that of Fanny and Henry. What are the stumbling blocks in these two courtships that cause them to fail? To what extent were the trials of these courtships responsible for Edmund's change of heart toward Fanny?




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