Maples for Gardens: A Color Encyclopedia

Maples for Gardens: A Color Encyclopedia

by C. J. van Gelderen, D. M. van Gelderen

Hardcover

$46.87 $49.95 Save 6% Current price is $46.87, Original price is $49.95. You Save 6%.

Temporarily Out of Stock Online

Eligible for FREE SHIPPING

Overview

Maples for Gardens: A Color Encyclopedia by C. J. van Gelderen, D. M. van Gelderen


This photo gallery of the best maples for garden use is a complement both to Maples of the World and to J. D. Vertrees's Japanese Maples, since more than a third of the book is devoted to Acer palmatum, including many new and unusual cultivars. The photographs, taken in locations in seven countries, demonstrate the wonderful diversity of form, color, and size that makes maples so useful in gardens of every kind.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780881924725
Publisher: Timber Press, Incorporated
Publication date: 08/15/1999
Pages: 294
Product dimensions: 8.88(w) x 11.26(h) x 0.85(d)

About the Author


D. M. van Gelderen is the principal author of several books on trees and shrubs. His family nursery, Firma C. Esveld in Boskoop, is one of the world's great specialist nurseries, famous for its conifers, maples, rhododendrons, and other woody plants. Among the awards D. M. van Gelderen has received in recognition of his contributions to horticulture are the Gold Veitch Memorial Medal of the Royal Horticultural Society and the Dutch Dendrological Society's Silver Doorenbos Medal. In 2000, he was named "Officer in the Order of Oranje Nassau" by Her Majesty Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands, in recognition of his work for the Royal Boskoop Horticultural Society and his contribution to horticultural literature.

Cor van Gelderen works in the family nursery, Firma C. Esveld in Boskoop, one of the world's great specialist nurseries, famous for its conifers, maples, rhododendrons, and other woody plants.

Read an Excerpt


Woods and Roots
All maples are woody. The wood is hard and finely grained and has been used for making tools, toys, furniture, and musical instruments. Among a diversity of uses of maples by Native North Americans, wood of Acer glabrum (Rocky Mountain maple) was used to make snowshoes and tepee pegs; A. macrophyllum (big-leaf maple), canoe paddles; and A. saccharinum (silver maple), arrows.

The root system is much branched, helping trees maintain their stability. Roots of most if not all maples develop a symbiotic relationship with particular fungi, forming structures called mycorrhizae. The fungi assist maples in the uptake of certain nutrients from the soil, such as phosphorus, potassium, and sulfur. Fertilizing a maple may reduce its mycorrhizal population.

Fruits and Seeds
Maple fruits are distinctively shaped and arranged in the form of paired nutlets, each with a wing. Such a fruit is called a samara. The nutlets may be small and an entire samara not longer than 5mm (3/16 inch), or quite large with samaras 50mm (2 inches) long.

Some maples produce fruits abundantly but may not set viable seed. The phenomenon of producing fruits without fertilization is called parthenocarpy. The tendency to parthenocarpy varies depending on the species. An example of a strong tendency to parthenocarpy is provided by Acer griseum, paperbark maple. One may harvest buckets full of fruits but usually they are all sterile. In addition to the phenomenon of dioecism, discussed with "Flowers," some maples may produce male and female flowers on different branches of the same tree, which is called monoecism. Usually there is sufficient pollination in monoecious maples to produce a crop of viable seeds.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews