The Mapping of Love and Death (Maisie Dobbs Series #7)

The Mapping of Love and Death (Maisie Dobbs Series #7)

by Jacqueline Winspear
4.2 87

NOOK Book(eBook)

$9.99
View All Available Formats & Editions
Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
Want a NOOK ? Explore Now

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Mapping of Love and Death 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 87 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I finished this book in one day, even getting up in the middle of the night so I could find out how it ended. Very well crafted, interesting mystery and all of the characters I've grown familiar with and care about. Loaned it to my mother, as I have loaned the rest of the series, and she too finished it in one day because she couldn't put it down! We both agreed that this is the best Maisie Dobbs book so far.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In 1932, Maisie Dobbs receives a note from Dr. Hayden of Massachusetts General Hospital who volunteered as a combat physician during the Great War; and of whom Maisie worked with. He asks her to meet with an elderly American couple whose son went missing during the 1916 Battle of the Somme. The Clintons inform her that farmers in France have uncovered a series of rooms that were part of the trenches. Inside are bodies of the British Cartography Section including their son who joined as a teen in 1914. They want to know who killed him as the autopsy revealed he died from a blow to his face. Maisie, with Billy supporting her agrees, to investigate. She looks at the other information like letters and a dairy to help her. As she digs deep into what happened in this trench room in 1916, Maisie also copes with personal issues starting with Billy's wife leaving the psychiatric ward, Dr. Maurice's illness, Stratton's replacement at the Yard and her feelings for Canadian expatriate James Compton. This is a terrific Depression Era whodunit as Maisie knows she has achieved her prime goal and is now entering her middle years so feels a bit adrift as she is undecided what next. The case is superb as the inquiry provides the reader a deep look at trench warfare during WWI. As entertaining as the military mystery are the goings-on in the heroine's personal life. The mapping of Love and death is a great historical investigation thriller. Harriet Klausner
GrammyK More than 1 year ago
The author never disappoints. Maisie Dobbs is a woman that we can relate to. She's strong, smart, and very intuitive. The story unfolds with twists and turns, and leads us to late, sleepless nights! I always feel sad when the book ends, and I have to say goodbye to Maisie until the next book comes along.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Maisie Dobbs is one of my favorite series, and Jacqueline Winspear does not disappoint in the latest novel. In previous books, I occasionally felt the case overshadowed Maisie's own journey, the real story in these books. However, The Mapping of Love and Death provides a great balance between the two and deepens Maisie's character even further. A great read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I absolutely love these books!  As a child I loved mystery stories and read books by Enid Blyton.  Later, I discovered Agatha Christie.  Now Maisie Dobbs is my favorite series.  I hope Ms. Winspear keeps it up for a long time. I love her attention to historical details and look forward to each new book.  
KJCMN More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this book immensely. It is well-written, well-researched with interesting history woven into the story. All the characters have well-definied personalities, traits, habits, etc. You become engaged in the story from the beginning. Maisie Dobbs' is a devoted, thoughtful, respectful, and intelligent detective and she is dedicated to a fair and thorough final conclusion. Ms. Winspear's books are a delight to read...calming and interesting for a summer read. Enjoy!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
In this seventh book of the Maisie Dobbs detective series, author Jacqueline Winspear takes us inside the world of cartographers serving in the British Army in the first World War. Always well-researched, she once again throws light on a little-known area of of the first "Great War." She also brings in ties to the early land development days in the first part of the twentieth century in California, tying the two together as Maisie investigates the death of a young American cartographer who served for Britain during the war. There are several important personal developments for Maisie, who finalizes her relationship to her longtime mentor Maurice Blanche and enters a new phase of her connection to the Compton family. Assistant Billy Beale returns as Maisie's man on the ground in her unconventional yet satisfying investigation.
cloggiedownunder More than 1 year ago
The Mapping of Love and Death is the seventh book in the Maisie Dobbs series by British-born American author, Jacqueline Winspear. Psychologist and investigator, Maisie Dobbs is engaged by a Boston couple, Edward and Martha Clifton, whose youngest son, Michael, died in the trenches in France in 1917. Not until fifteen years later were his remains found, and with them, letters from an English Nurse.  Michael was a cartographer who had just spent part of his inheritance on land in California that he felt sure bore oil. When the autopsy report shows that he was murdered, Maisie is asked to track down his unnamed nurse and, if she can, to find his murderer. To distract her from her task, James Compton returns from Canada for good, her mentor, Maurice Blanche becomes increasingly frail, and Billy Beal is understandably apprehensive about Doreen’s return from hospital.  This instalment explores the vital role of cartographers in war, as well as the important contribution of the many Nursing Units, and the purpose of cinematographers on the front lines. Maisie has to deal with DI Caldwell now that Stratton has gone to Special Branch; she is mugged, goes to car races, visits the School of Military Engineers and more than one hospital. The value of post-traumatic counselling is highlighted, and Winspear drags several red herrings through her plot to keep the reader guessing on more than one front. The final chapters see great changes wrought in Maisie’s personal life and presage possible major alterations in her career. Once again, an excellent read that will have readers seeking out the next book in the series, A Lesson In Secrets. 
gardenerME More than 1 year ago
This is the latest in a terrific (and my favorite) mystery series!
Lonnie More than 1 year ago
The latest Maisie Dobbs is a wonderful cap to a fabulous series. I hope Jacqueline Winspear keeps writing. Maisie is like a wise friend. I will read and reread these books. i also reommencd the Charles Todd Ian Rutledge books, which are set between WWI and WWII as well.
bookloverAZ More than 1 year ago
This is the kind of story to take you away to another time and place but keeps you in the here and now as far a the relivince of the story goes. I can relate to war and what it must have been like for those who lived through the first world war. We are going through it again and Maisie has helped me to understand many of the problems and feeling left behind.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Helllo im tigerfang and i need a friend! -tosses a mouse in her direction-
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Shade:*looks at him closely* i do not need food to be tempted. But thank you anyway. *she acted confident even though she was smaller then normal*
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Beautifully written, excellent plot - holds the reader's interest!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
RobertDowns More than 1 year ago
If you enjoy British mysteries, then THE MAPPING OF LOVE AND DEATH is for you. Jacqueline Winspear creates a heroine in Maisie Dobbs who has a strong moral code, and she’s every bit the three-dimensional character that springs to life in well-written prose. It’s hard not to get behind her and root for her every step of the way. While I appreciated the writing, the prose felt long and drawn out, the dialogue often turning into monologues instead of having the more immediate punch of a soliloquy. And I had to force myself on more than one occasion to reach the end. My only explanation is that I never completely identified with the characters or felt as though I had fully inhabited their world. Instead, I felt more like an observer, only touching the surface before being carried away. Not that this is any reflection on the author or her writing. I blame it on the British and their sophisticated nature and multiple levels of bureaucracy, whereas I take a more open-ended and far encompassing approach to my humor. And this is why I’ve never been a big fan of British mysteries, other than Rhys Bowen’s Lady Victoria Georgiana Charlotte Eugenie, or Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes. I’ve pondered this scenario on multiple occasions, and I’ve reached the following conclusion: there’s an aristocratic stiffness underlying these mysteries that makes me want to turn and run in the other direction faster than being shot out of a cannon. But it’s not going to stop me from seeking out any mystery, including the British ones, because I’m ever the optimist, and I know one day, not too far in the future, I’ll be pleasantly surprised again. Robert Downs Author of Falling Immortality: Casey Holden, Private Investigator
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
And interesting period references.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have only recently found Jacqueline Winspear's wonderful Maisie Dobbs series, and I have now devoured all of them. Highly recommended.
tinabobina99 More than 1 year ago
This author excels at time and place. As a Geography major and cartography aficionado, I loved how she uses mapping both literally and figuratively, as do all the best cartographers. Love this series!