The Marabou Stork Nightmares

The Marabou Stork Nightmares

by Irvine Welsh
4.5 15

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Marabou Stork Nightmares 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 15 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have read and re-read this book countless times. In my opinion it is Welsh's finest work. It's one of the few books that never slows down and keeps you reading. Some of the material will disturb you, make you cringe, want to close the cover and catch your breath, but you cant stop. It is that good. The format it is written in is odd yet interesting with the 'Going down' and 'Coming up' descriptions of Roy's travel through his different concusses. I suggest this to everyone whom has an open mind and enjoys something truly different. A fantastic read, one of my favorites.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Irvine Welsh is one of my favorite authors and this book is one of the reasons why! I love the unique format and dialect as well the imagery his language evokes!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book can relate to all of us that has issues such as guilt, respect, revenge,dignity, shame and perhaps redemption. During the apartheid revolution in South Africa Roy Strang saw the most hideous creature in the zoo 'The Marabou Stork' relating to his stories,dreams and memory he finds himself more concerned about his hatred toward his action. Resting in a coma in Edinburgh with voices hearing by, Yet for a boy like him can he really be forgiven...?
Guest More than 1 year ago
The first Welsh novel I read. Welsh does a fine job of captivating his audience; in a sense, Welsh has mastered his craft. He starts off bizarre, then turns into intense, reminding you that things can only get worse. 'Filth' was just purchased yesterday-I wonder what the next tale will be like...
Guest More than 1 year ago
Brutal and forceful in its convictions, yet somehow compassionate in meaning, this novel certainly is not for the inexperienced reader. It weaves a web of complex emotions, from the Roy's surrealistic african hunt, which symbolizes the personification of the character's own struggles, to memories of his childhood and adolescence, including his transformation into a brutal thug. All this is interrupted by realizations of what is going on around him. As the parallel stories converge, the reader realizes the meaning of all of the madness taking place inside Roy's comatose head. There comes a time when one can no longer run away from struggle, but must fight it, hoping only that it is not too late. Welsh spares no aspect of this novel any injustice. He deserves full praise as one of the most developed novelists in British history.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I thought this book was wonderful. the changing perspective kept it interesting. There are so many books that u read and u keep waiting for them to get to the deeper subject and they never do. this book is all about depth and perspective. It induces you to hate/love/respect/criticize the author one page at a time. Roys hunt for the stork is symbolic and his coma life is a sort of sickly realistic world full of irony that u can recongnize in our world. I felt the real heart of the book were his childhood/growin up memories, as u can almost justify his actions based on his experiences. It is alos inspiring because u meet peoplke everyday and wonder, 'Is this really all there is to him/her? Whats deeper?' Welsh provides a detailed story pushing u to see the main character in a negetively shallow way and then when the character finally comes to terms with himself you feel as though if there is hope for somone to create a character like this there is hope in the world.