Market Aesthetics: The Purchase of the Past in Caribbean Diasporic Fiction

Market Aesthetics: The Purchase of the Past in Caribbean Diasporic Fiction

by Elena Machado Saez

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Overview

Market Aesthetics: The Purchase of the Past in Caribbean Diasporic Fiction by Elena Machado Saez

In Market Aesthetics, Elena Machado Sáez explores the popularity of Caribbean diasporic writing within an interdisciplinary, comparative, and pan-ethnic framework. She contests established readings of authors such as Junot Díaz, Julia Alvarez, Edwidge Danticat, and Robert Antoni while showcasing the work of emerging writers such as David Chariandy, Marlon James, and Monique Roffey. By reading these writers as part of a transnational literary trend rather than within isolated national ethnic traditions, the author is able to show how this fiction adopts market aesthetics to engage the mixed blessings of multiculturalism and globalization via the themes of gender and sexuality.

New World Studies
Modern Language Initiative

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780813937052
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
Publication date: 03/24/2015
Series: New World Studies Series
Pages: 264
Product dimensions: 5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Elena Machado Sáez, Associate Professor of English at Florida Atlantic University, is coauthor with Raphael Dalleo of The Latino/a Canon and the Emergence of Post-Sixties Literature.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix

Introduction: Marketing Multicultural Ethnics, Promoting Postcolonial Ethics 1

1 Mixed Blessings: Readerships, Postcolonial Ethics, and the Problem of Intimacy 19

2 Kinship Routes: Contextualizing Diaspora via the Market in Andrea Levy and David Chariandy 46

3 Writing the Reader: Literacy and Contradictory Pedagogies in Julia Alvarez, Michelle Cliff, and Marlon James 82

4 Messy Intimacies: Postcolonial Romance in Ana Menendez, Dionne Brand, and Monique Roffey 120

5 Dictating Diaspora: Gendering Postcolonial Violence in Junot Díaz and Edwidge Danticat 154

Conclusion: Electronic Archives and the Digital Futures of Caribbean Diasporic Writing 197

Notes 213

Bibliography 229

Index 245

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