Market Forces

Market Forces

Audiobook(CD - Library - Unabridged CD)

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Overview

Market Forces by Richard K. Morgan, Simon Vance

A blistering near-future thriller that will propel Richard Morgan onto the bestseller lists - a novel that will be enjoyed by any thriller reader. What do you buy and sell when the global markets reach saturation point? The markets themselves. Thirty years from now the big players in global capitalism have moved on from commodities. The big money is in conflict investment. The corporations keep a careful watch on the wars of liberation and revolution that burn constantly around the world. They guage who the winners will be and sell them arms, intelligence and power. In return for a slice of the action when the war is won. The reward? A stake in the new nation. It's cynical, brutal and it has nothing to do with democracy and the rule of law. So what else is new? The executives in this lethal game bid for contracts, fight for promotion, secure their lives on the roads. Fighting lethal duels in souped up, heavily armoured cars on the empty motorways of the future. Chris Faulkener has a lethal reputation and a new job at Shorn Associates. Has he got what it takes to make a real killing?

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781400131396
Publisher: Tantor Media, Inc.
Publication date: 04/28/2005
Edition description: Library - Unabridged CD
Product dimensions: 6.90(w) x 6.90(h) x 1.80(d)

About the Author

Richard K. Morgan is the acclaimed author of The Cold Commands, The Steel Remains, Thirteen, Woken Furies, Market Forces, Broken Angels, and Altered Carbon, a New York Times Notable Book that also won the Philip K. Dick Award in 2003. The movie rights to Altered Carbon were optioned by Joel Silver and Warner Bros on publication, and a film version is currently in development with Mythology Entertainment. Market Forces was also optioned to Warner Bros, before it was even published, and it won the John W. Campbell Award in 2005. Thirteen won the Arthur C. Clarke Award in 2007 and is currently under movie option to Straight Up films. The Steel Remains won the Gaylactic Spectrum Award in 2010, and its sequel, The Cold Commands, appeared in both Kirkus Reviews’ and NPR’s Best Science Fiction/Fantasy Books of the Year lists. Morgan is a fluent Spanish speaker and has lived and worked in Madrid, Istanbul, Ankara, and London, as well as having traveled extensively in the Americas, Africa, and Australia. He now lives in Scotland with his wife, Virginia, and son, Daniel.

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Market Forces 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 25 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I will attempt to avoid the more political aspects of this novel, as some reviewers here have focussed on, and instead try to approach it as a Richard K. Morgan thriller, pure and simple. As a reader of his Takeshi Kovacs sci-noir novels, I was approaching this book as a welcome change of pace from the 25th Century and quite looking forward to it. I was a little chagrined to see that, unlike the abrupt change of genre William Gibson took in 'Pattern Recognition,' Morgan still based his new novel in a late-21st Century setting, vaguely recognizable but still different. Disappointed in this, and not at all pleased at seeing Morgan (self-admittedly) wear the influences of 'Rollerball' and 'Mad Max' on his sleeve, I very much adopted a 'who cares?' attitude towards this book and was frankly tired of Morgan's anti-laissez-faire-capitalism stance by the first third or so of the story. Also, Chris Faulkner's marital problems and full-blown plunging into the decadence of corporate life at Shorn Associates seemed very out of character for him and, though vital to an appreciation of Faulkner's motivations, especially in the latter stages of the story, was not at all well-explained. Nevertheless, the further time you spend with the story, the more you realize that, just as happens with Chris Faulkner, the manic pace of this period's corporate society will indeed confuse and bewilder you much as it does Faulkner. There is still so much that is a cipher in this book -- frankly, I cannot believe that even mega-corporations will ever be allowed to suspend civil liberties in their respective nations, much less the Third World, to the extent seen in 'Market Forces.' Nor, frankly, does Morgan provide a compelling reason why this in fact happened in his story. In this fashion, while not as severely, Morgan falls into the same trap with his world-building as George Orwell did in '1984:' namely, the macrocosmic situation serves merely to service the plot and does not really stand up to scrutiny. However, again as with '1984,' by the time you get to the final third of 'Market Forces,' you won't mind too much, as Morgan ramps up the action and emotions quite well, in a totally believable fashion that makes you wonder, frankly, just HOW anti-corporation Morgan truly is. In the end, 'Market Forces,' while still nowhere near Morgan's best Takeshi Kovacs effort, is a satisfying novel.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
*waalks up to the girl* I heard you wanted to be a se.x slve
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She waits to be vhecked to be sold
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This novel takes place in the near future and puts into place so many great ideas and concepts of a living breathing sci-fi world. The best part about the story is that you are totally immersed in the story's setting. Read the other reviews for a basic plot out line...i read this book over a year ago and will pick it up again to re-read it. Richard Morgan's stuff is just begging to be made into movies and this novel is his best. I cannot wait for the sequel.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an interesting book that postulates a future 'de-evolution' of modern society. With greedy corporations calling all the global shots, the gulf between the have and have-nots has grown to alarming proportions. A handful of investment firms now dictate world economic policy, with an eye to keeping themselves firmly entrenched in power and the powerless right where they are. A pecking order is established among those vying for number one status through a unique kind of duel- not with guns, but cars. It becomes standard policy to challenge your corporate rivals to a violent road race where only the most ruthless survive, a clear metaphor for a primitive, Darwinian survival of the fittest. The unbridled violence unleashed by this winner-take-all free-for-all keeps the story moving at a fast clip, as gory as it is. Far from being a novel of redemption as you might expect at the end, Market Forces is instead a somber speculation of what could happen if corporations were unleashed to do whatever it takes to fatten their bottom line, with no regard whatsoever for the well being of the less fortunate. While there are glimpses of a kind of Wild West justice at times, mostly the story is sobering in its portray of a future society where pure capitalism without charity rules, where only those totally lacking in morals or compassion become celebrities and hold all the cards. It¿s a fascinating future to imagine, but one that would be disastrous in reality. More than anything, Market Forces is a warning about the direction we might take (or are taking, as some would say) as corporations grow bigger, executives wealthier, and the average worker marginalized, outsourced, or sent packing. Recommended. Also read An Audience for Einstein by Mark Wakely, a clever story about a major medical discovery with worrisome implications for the future of mankind.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In the middle of the twenty-first century, the market place controls all aspects of life with no governmental redistribution of wealth to interfere. In this global economy the big money makers are those who peddle Conflict Investments; there is a large and continuous market for the selling of all types of arms to small insurgent bands at a phenomenal price while encouraging the guerilla bands to make war not love. Recently safety has become an issue for the affluent.--- Chris Faulkner of Shorn Associates has become a successful salesman peddling arms and related equipment. The Brit enjoys his literally cut throat job especially the executive perks such as driving a car and killing other road hogs. However, he has recently made a mistake by allowing mercy to someone he defeated during a road rage skirmish. He vows to never again allow his conscience to get in the way of his lifestyle. His chance surfaces when the eternal South American coup d¿etat may be out of control. Though wary and thinking back excessively to his ghetto roots, Chris plans to rectify this problem.--- This gloom and doom future will not be one to worry about social security as no social or security seems to be the norm in Richard K. Morgan¿s dark satirical spin of MARKET FORCES out of control. The story line paints a grim future in which to paraphrase Jessie Ventura as the wrestler not the governor that it is not whether you win or lose, but how well you cheat. Though Chris¿ growing disaffection is not adequately explained, the Enron and Bush-Blair economics are taken to the extreme in this powerful condemnation of a systematic handout to the rich while everyone else pays the price.