The Market Revolution: Jacksonian America, 1815-1846 / Edition 1

The Market Revolution: Jacksonian America, 1815-1846 / Edition 1

by Charles Sellers
5.0 2
ISBN-10:
0195089200
ISBN-13:
9780195089202
Pub. Date:
03/28/1994
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780195089202
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Publication date: 03/28/1994
Edition description: Reissue
Pages: 512
Sales rank: 854,608
Product dimensions: 9.19(w) x 6.13(h) x 1.34(d)

Table of Contents

Land and Market
3(31)
Ambiguous Republicanism
34(36)
"Let Us Conquer Space"
70(33)
The Crisis of 1819
103(34)
Hard Times, Hard Feelings, Hard Money
137(35)
"A General Mass of Disaffection"
172(30)
God and Mammon
202(35)
Ethos vs. Eros
237(32)
Politicians "Reapply Principles"
269(32)
Millennial Democracy
301(31)
Ambiguous Democracy
332(32)
The Bourgeois Republic
364(32)
The Great Contradiction
396(33)
Bibliographical Essay 429(20)
Notes 449(38)
Index 487

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The Market Revolution: Jacksonian America, 1815-1846 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
MaximG More than 1 year ago
A excellent example of Marxist or Progressive history at its best; angry, passionate and written with a gimlet eye for how the apostles of market capitalism drew all of American society into their orbit in the 1st half of the 19th Century. One reads it with a sense that Professor Sellers would cheerfully volunteer for a dangerous time travel experiment for the chance to punch John Marshall in the jaw. I don't get to read enough history written with this level of personal animus about the topic. I recommend this book book for its own considerable value and for comparison to Daniel Walker Howe's "What Hath God Wrought" which covers the same ground from a nearly opposite perspective. (As a rule: If Seller's likes someone, Howe disapproves, while if Howe approves, Sellers despises. The one exception is John Calhoun: they both hate that guy.) Required reading in the best sense of the word for anyone interested in this often neglected period of U.S. history.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
There's not much you can say about the Market Revolution. It's the only truly synthetic book I ever read, in that it combines all the various 'new' historigraphy, race/class/gender history, cliometric economic history, old-school political history, and religious history with a viewpoint so firmly held and powerfully articulated. Sellers is the last of the old-time progressive historians, who still resists the triumph of capital, even though it happened before he was born. You may not agree with his politics, but if you read this book, you'll have the entire landscape of the early republic present in your mind, as vivid as family, for the rest of your life.