The Martian Chronicles

The Martian Chronicles

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The Martian Chronicles 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 132 reviews.
MaskedBandito More than 1 year ago
this book was truly an amazing read. i've read sci-fi before but never like this. I read it 3 years ago and to this day it is one of the best books i have ever read. The way Bradbury can compile short stories in this book and somehow relate every story to one another and give them common features is simply incredible. He even borrows from E.A Poe in one of my favorite stories. this is a must read.
Scotman55 More than 1 year ago
The Martian Chronicles Ray Bradbury’s recent passing created an opportunity to reread some of his stories and novels. No, I don’t like all that Bradbury wrote, but his whimsical, lyrical style always attracted me. He could create a world of “Firemen” in Fahrenheit 451 or the mysterious characters of “The Illustrated Man” and leave me entranced. The Martian Chronicles was no exception! First Impressions: The book itself is a loosely-knit series of short stories, one leading to the next, in date order in the writer’s 21st century future. Here we have Earth that is looking towards Mars as a haven from the brewing atomic wars and rumors of such. What impressed me was the stylized characters and fleshed-out civilizations and how both Martian and Earthman deal with each other, as well as their own jealousies and prejudices. Stories! I won’t bore the reader with a mini-review of each tale, but the few that I really liked involved some of the crazy characters – one an off-kilter man, Spender, part of a crew from the Fourth Expedition, who didn’t want to see Mars commercialized as he looked upon the dead Martian civilization (destroyed by Man’s diseases – holy War of the Worlds!) and decides to kill off his own men and keep the planet pristine! That plan does not go over well with Captain Wilder. The darkness of the story and its clear criticism of colonialism were enticing to me. The other story I really liked involved the last colonists on Mars (the rest being called back to Earth because of atomic war) who missed the last rocket, and gets lonely. Far off, he hears a phone ring. He finally finds who rang it, hoping for some female company, but the guy isn’t so lonely that he does not have standards! Finally, the tale of a Martian and an Earth worker, both going to a party driving in their respective vehicles and meet each other on a lonely road – 10,000 years apart! Crazy. Bottom Line: Most of the stories flow well one to the other. Ray does reflect some of the 1940s’ style prejudices of the time which may put off modern readers, but if you read Ray’s poetic style in its historic context, you too will see that a lot of his criticism and satire is still quite relevant. Highly recommended!
BrianIndianFan More than 1 year ago
There's really not much that one can say that hasn't already been said about this classic science fiction set of stories...but I'll try. This collection of short stories was originally published in the early 1950s. Drawing upon his influences - such as Edgar Rice Burrough's "John Carter" series - Bradbury tells the story of the first interactions between the aboriginal Martians and humans and then the eventual full-scale colonization of the red planet. This colonization and interaction take place against the backdrop of tense times on earth - a reflection of the escalating Cold War between the Americans and the Soviet Union. One could also see this as a replay of European colonization of North America - if the Indians had telepathy and better weapons. Ultimately, the 4th expedition discovers that the entire Martian civilization has been wiped out by chicken pox - a disease that sickened earth children, but almost never killed them. It is an ironic counterpoint to Wells' "War of the Worlds" that Bradbury brings the killing virus to the Martians. The middle third of the story continues with the colonization of Mars. The interactions with the remaining Martians are fewer, with the emphasis on terraforming the 4th planet - in habitation if not evironmentally. Of course, humans have fled to Mars, but their humanity has stowed away and made its home there as well. The story "Usher II" addresses the issue of censorship; an issue that has metastasized in our day into political correctness. This theme of censorship by a heavy-handed government would be further developed by Bradbury in Fahrenheit 451. Ultimately, somebody on earth decided to push the button, and full-scale nuclear war breaks out. Seeing earth aflame, most Martian settlers elect to return to earth (why?). The last third of the book tells the tale of the remainder of humanity making his last stand as permanent residents on Mars. Since the book as originally published was going to fall victim to the Moody Blues "Days of Future Passed", the 1997 re-release of the book pushed all dates ahead by 31 years so that they run from 2030 to 2057 (as opposed to the original 1999-2026). This keeps the book from being looked upon as an anachronism. The publisher has also gone inside the stories themselves to make sure that they are consistent with the revised dating. Having now read both "War of the Worlds" and this book, I will at some point attempt to read Kim Stanley Robinson's "Mars Trilogy" which may take some of these themes to another level. BOTTOM LINE: If you love science fiction and haven't read this, shame on you for six weeks.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fantastic Book! i read this book back in high school in science fiction class. at the time i thought it was boring and dull. BUT i have reread it 4 years later. i must say this book is a classic! (having realized that i was just a Jr. in high school who hated to read) know that i am older i see the sheer genius of this book, the child like imagination with a philosophical massage, and the , dare i say, suspense Bradbury throws in. mans inhumanity to hes fellow man and others from another world. if you are a sifi buff this is the book for you!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
After lord of rings this is best book ever written. It opened my imagination to read wow books can be likee that it made me avid reader. Amazing stories sad profound.
Hyzenthlay More than 1 year ago
I read this as an adolescent and have recently read it again as an adult. Bradbury never disappoints! I enjoyed it even more in my "old age". The complexity of the story that lost me as a child (not that I knew it at the time) intrigued me to no end! Bradbury has always been one of my favs and it was nice to sit down with an old "friend"!
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DeadlyFern More than 1 year ago
It wasn’t what I was expecting, but it was good. It’s the third short story book I’ve read this year. That being said, I did like the way he weaved them together to form a somewhat structured story ark. The Martian and There Will Come Soft Rains where my favorites. The last story, The Million-Year Picnic, made me cry. The thing I did’t like was the portrait of women. I know this was written sometimes in the 1950′s, but those stories are about the future. It made me angry that women in all the stories where portrayed as frail and dumb. If you can look past, I’d say it’s worth a read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Remember reading this in 8th grade and loving it. Gonna give it another go.
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karl-o More than 1 year ago
One of the books that all should read, even those not attracted to science-fiction. Though written in the beginnings of the "sci-fi" era it is particularly appropriate in an age that still hasn't learned to protect the environment, the differences in cultural heritage, or appreciate the beauty of things uncommon.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Im a 16 year old and i read these books after i saw the movie and im impresed with the style and quality
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RebeccaScaglione More than 1 year ago
My quickie review of Ray Bradbury's The Martian Chronicles: The book reads like a group of short stories but all put together makes one big story. Storyline: In the future, people go to Mars to make it a new "Earth" since they've done a great job destroying Earth.  Martians get sick with human diseases and die.  We ruin Mars just like we ruined Earth.  A war breaks out on Earth. . . I enjoyed this book but it has a lot of warnings for us. Warning 1: Don't destroy our Earth, it's the only one we have. Warning 2: Stop the racism and prejudices. Warning 3: Don't be so afraid of the unknown. Martian Chronicles was a short read that could be seen as depressing sci-fi.  I read it in high school but definitely have a better understanding of the novel now, as an adult. Thanks to Sarah Says Read for reading it with me!  (I know, Sarah, it took me forever to get this post up since we read it a while ago!) Have you read The Martian Chronicles? Thanks for reading, Rebecca @ Love at First Book
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We are very happy with this transaction. It was shipped immediately and the book was exactly as it had been described. We would definitely purchase again. thank you.
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