Mary Boleyn: The Mistress of Kings

Mary Boleyn: The Mistress of Kings

by Alison Weir
3.9 38

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Mary Boleyn: The Mistress of Kings by Alison Weir

NATIONAL BESTSELLER • NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE
 
New York Times bestselling author and noted British historian Alison Weir gives us the first full-scale, in-depth biography of Mary Boleyn, sister to Queen Anne as well as mistress to Anne’s husband, Henry VIII—and one of the most misunderstood figures of the Tudor age. Making use of extensive original research, Weir shares revelations on the ambitious Boleyn family and the likely nature of the relationship between the Boleyn sisters. Unraveling the truth about Mary’s much-vaunted notoriety at the French court and her relations with King François I, Weir also explores Mary’s role at the English court and how she became Henry VIII’s lover. She tracks the probable course of their affair and investigates the truth behind Mary’s notorious reputation. With new and compelling evidence, Weir presents the most conclusive answer to date on the paternity of Mary’s children, long speculated to have been Henry VIII’s progeny. Alison Weir pieces together a life steeped in mystery and misfortune, debunking centuries-old myths to give us the truth about Mary Boleyn, the so-called “great and infamous whore.”
 
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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780345521347
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Publication date: 09/04/2012
Pages: 416
Sales rank: 166,387
Product dimensions: 5.58(w) x 7.92(h) x 0.91(d)

About the Author

Alison Weir is the New York Times bestselling author of many historical biographies, including The Lady in the Tower, Mistress of the Monarchy, Henry VIII, Eleanor of Aquitaine, The Life of Elizabeth I, and The Six Wives of Henry VIII, and of the novels Captive Queen, Innocent Traitor, and The Lady Elizabeth. She lives in Surrey, England, with her husband.

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Mary Boleyn 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 38 reviews.
Paris182 More than 1 year ago
Alison Weir, certainly one of our most prolific biographers of late Medieval England; has perhaps overreached herself with this biography of Mary Boleyn. Thanks to the novels of Phillipa Gregory and the attendant film she is now slightly more than a sideline to history. But the truth is, that is all she is. And unfortunately Weirs biography "Mary Boleyn; Mistress of Kings" confirms that. This is a lady who had a brief moment in history and then spent the rest of her life in a fairly contented obscurity. Married below her station (the second time, the first was to a popular nobleman) she did not come to court, had little contact with her sister, and apparently recieved no benefits from briefly being the mistress of not one but two kings. Weir's biography is full of references of where she might have lived, what she might have done, and who she might have known. By about the the third or fourth chapter, the truth is that you don't really care. One realizes that the reason that she faded into the background was that she was essentially boring. I will admit that the research is impressive and prodigious, but nothing concrete seems to come from it. I found the same problem with her book about Kathryn Swynford (a far more interesting person), there was just not enough information to make a solid biography.
harstan More than 1 year ago
This is a terrific biography of a woman who was the older sister to one of the merry wives of King Henry VIII and mistress to her brother-in-law and his rival across the Channel King Francois I of France. Allison Weir asserts with a logical argument that the romanticized novels and the papal commentary of Mary Boleyn as a whore is false. Instead, she was an intelligent woman who went with the flow realizing her choices were limited. Her first husband William Carey was extremely influential at Henry's court and would most likely never settle for a whoring spouse. Her second husband commoner William Stafford also from an influential family with ties to the king had no reason to settle on a whoring widow who was older than him and was mother to two small children. Instead Ms. Weir believes Mary had no say in whether she would be The Mistress of Kings. The historian also argues against the belief that her subject's two children were sired by Henry as at least her son (Henry) was the offspring of William. Finally she debunks the so called heroic redemption of Mary interceding with her lover the king to save her sister's life as a myth with no substantial support; a survivor Mary would know most likely she would join Anne in the Tower awaiting execution. Born most likely in 1498 and dead forty-five years later, she was a product of the Tudor era. Inductive reasoning shows a lack of supportive documents from those friendly or neutral towards the Boleyn family condemning her. Only enemies of her or her family call her a whore. This is a strong look at a woman surviving the men in her life, but unable to speak out agonist the false portrayal of her as a "great and infamous whore". Alison Weir champions a more plausible fairer assessment. Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anything by Alison Weir is richly detailed and a page turner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was expecting something along the lines of Weir's "The Lady Elizabeth" but was surprised to find that this was more historical than mere fiction. However, that aside I found the story of Mary Boleyn interesting and although still much isn't known about her what the author presents gives more enlightenment that has previously been compiled together for a reading audience. Overall a good read
Lpcprof More than 1 year ago
Alison Weir's Mary Boleyn is an original biography of Anne's older sister, an overlooked figure at Henry VIII's court. By using original sources and through careful analysis, Weir presents a picture of an intelligent and talented woman who, contrary to the generally accepted interpretation, influenced as much as she could the world into which she was born.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Historically correct and interesting, but not as much fun as The Other Boleyn Girl by Phillipa Gregory, which was not so factual.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I found this book very interesting and you felt sorry for her because her father used her to achieve his success. However, she was a survivor and in the end she married for love and you felt the happiness she finally was able to have. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and found it hard to put down. At last I feel I know something about her personally instead of through stories of Anne and Henry VIII.
MsAnnie More than 1 year ago
Mary is not one of the best known characters in Tudor-lore, but what an interesting time she heralded in. Good writing, well paced and a lot of fun facts for the Tudor fan. Not a lot known about Mary after Henry threw her over, and about her relationship with Anne, this book sheds some light on her later life, a great read for those that devour anything Tudor.
historyloverDM More than 1 year ago
Although this book shed little light about a lot of Mary Boleyn's life,it did dispell many rumors about her.She was known as the Great Whore of much of Tudor fiction.It is interesting to note that much of her affair with Henry VIII was conducted with discretion on the Kings part and she had no such reputation.An unfortunate product of parental ambition it was good to see Mary rebel and create a life of her own.Her intelligence,which was always maligned,allowed her to be the only survivor of the Boleyn children.I liked the book because it wiped away many myths and misconceptions and I learned to appreciate the true character of this woman
nancat2 More than 1 year ago
It's too bad the title "Much Ado About Nothing" is already taken, because that would adequately sum up this book. I'm a huge Alison Weir fan, but this latest effort is not up to her usual standards. As usual, she carefully sorts out what facts can and cannot be verified about her subjects (always a good practice when writing history or biography), but what remains to be told about Mary Boleyn could be told in one or two chapters. The book just confirms that she was a minor player in the events that unfolded around her.If you want to read about a former royal mistress who actually DID have an impact on later history, I suggest you read Weir's "Mistress of the Monarchy".
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love to read anything historical concerning HenryVIII and his wives, but this book was extremely boring and hard to get through. I felt like I was reading parts over and over again. Very disappointing.
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Mary Boleyn is a footnote to history. She wasn't important enough for a whole book. This book is repetitive simply because there just isn't that much to say.
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